Historic Resources – Hamline Midway History http://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 14:04:05 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/hamline-midway-history-icon-150x150.jpg Historic Resources – Hamline Midway History http://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/ 32 32 Senate passes gun safety, mental health measure https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/senate-passes-gun-safety-mental-health-measure/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 14:04:05 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/senate-passes-gun-safety-mental-health-measure/ 24.06.22 Last night, US Senator Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) voted in favor of the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act, targeted legislation to address loopholes in the law that allowed mass shootings, including the need for additional resources to mental health and school safety. The bill provides historic investments in our mental health care system, including in rural […]]]>

24.06.22

Last night, US Senator Lisa Murkowski (R-AK) voted in favor of the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act, targeted legislation to address loopholes in the law that allowed mass shootings, including the need for additional resources to mental health and school safety. The bill provides historic investments in our mental health care system, including in rural areas, more resources for school safety, and helps keep guns out of the hands of criminals and those who do not. are not allowed to own them. The bill passed the Senate 65-33.

“From the outset, this bill was a compromise measure, spearheaded by a bipartisan group of 20 of my Senate colleagues. I join them in their commitment to show the public that Congress knows that the status quo on gun violence is not acceptable – that we can do more for the safety of schools, for the safety of our communities and to make in the face of the growing mental health crisis in this country,” said Senator Murkowski. “This legislation emphasizes mental health and school safety programs and provides additional funding to ensure that children and people of all ages are better protected. As a strong supporter of the 2nd Amendment and a gun owner myself, it was essential to ensure that this legislation did not violate the rights of law-abiding gun owners. It’s not. While this legislation is not perfect, it is a responsive, responsible, and targeted approach to addressing the very serious mass shootings and incidents of gun violence that this country continues to face.

The bill does NOT create a national red flag law, nor does it require or incentivize states to enact red flag laws, or penalize states that do not have such laws; it does NOT violate the Second Amendment rights of law-abiding citizens; and it does NOT create universal background checks, mental health checks, or mandatory or de facto waiting periods.

Click here for a myth vs fact sheet.

Invoice Highlights: [Click here for funding details.]

  • It provides federal funding to implement crisis intervention programs such as mental health courts, veterans courts and drug courts.
  • It improves access to mental health and suicide prevention programs, as well as crisis and trauma intervention.
  • It provides important resources for school safety and violence prevention.
  • It invests in telehealth and mental health services in schools, including early identification and intervention.
  • For buyers under 21, there is an enhanced background check to search for potentially disqualifying juvenile records, including checks with state databases and local law enforcement.
  • It ensures that convicted domestic violence abusers cannot illegally possess a firearm.

Related issues: Second Amendment, health


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How Amish History Connects to the Oregon Village Debate in Manheim Township [column] | Local voices https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/how-amish-history-connects-to-the-oregon-village-debate-in-manheim-township-column-local-voices/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 10:00:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/how-amish-history-connects-to-the-oregon-village-debate-in-manheim-township-column-local-voices/ In the mid-1700s, Amish families fleeing persecution in Europe settled in what are now Berks and Lancaster counties. The Amish of Berks County were known as the Northkill Settlement, named after Northkill Creek in the northwest corner of the county. The Amish of Lancaster County were known as the Old Conestoga Settlement, after the Conestoga […]]]>

In the mid-1700s, Amish families fleeing persecution in Europe settled in what are now Berks and Lancaster counties.

The Amish of Berks County were known as the Northkill Settlement, named after Northkill Creek in the northwest corner of the county.

The Amish of Lancaster County were known as the Old Conestoga Settlement, after the Conestoga River. Their community extended through northern Manheim Township and into Upper Leacock Township, approximately from Lancaster Airport, through Oregon Village, to Leola.

The Berks community was the first in the New World, begun in 1736. The Lancaster community, set up a year later, was the second.

But in 1757, during the French and Indian War, Delaware Indians attacked the Berks Colony, killing some settlers and capturing others. After that, the community slowly dissolved, its members moving to the greater safety and better farmland of the settlement of Old Conestoga. By 1800, the colony of Berks had disappeared.

However, the settlement of Old Conestoga flourished, its families becoming the foundation upon which Amish communities in Lancaster County and North America grew.

The individuals of this first surviving colony numbered in the hundreds. Today, approximately 1,200 Amish in 250 households live and farm on that same land. And approximately 350,000 Amish live in 31 states and four Canadian provinces, many of whom trace their roots to Lancaster County.

In December, a three-judge Commonwealth Court panel told Manheim Township officials that their predecessors had failed to properly consider the impact of the proposed Oregon Village mixed-use development on surrounding historic resources. . The development would consist of approximately 550 apartments, condos and homes; a mega-grocery; a 300-seat restaurant; A mall; and a six-lane highway.

The court ordered the current board of commissioners to do what a previous board failed to do: assess the project’s impact on surrounding historic resources.

Now, these officials are faced with a critical problem: determining which historic resources should be considered in their review:

— Will they examine the impact of the development on the bed and breakfast building whose owner took the case to court?

— Will they examine the impact on the village of Oregon, a historic community with many 18th century buildings?

— Will they examine the impact on the surrounding farming community, which is still home to the oldest surviving Amish community in North America?

It is entirely possible that the current board of directors will repeat the error of its predecessors. They have already decided not to hear new testimony from local history experts. They decided to consider only the limited testimony authorized by the previous board.

Yet throughout this month, township commissioners have taken a fresh look at evidence from past public hearings to determine what historic resources surrounding the project they should consider and what impact the development would have on those resources.

If they are thorough, they will have examined the testimony of Donald Kraybill, the professor at Elizabethtown College who is one of the world’s foremost experts on Amish history and culture.

Kraybill clearly testified that the proposed housing complex/mall and six-lane highway would disrupt and potentially force the end of the Amish settlement of Manheim Township.

A nearby Amish farmer said he couldn’t imagine how strollers, horse-drawn farm equipment or children walking to school could safely move through their community with a mall-sized development Belmont in the middle. He feared that it would “push us out”.

County residents concerned about protecting their Amish neighbors and preserving their historic farming community should contact the Manheim Township Commissioners before addressing the issue at their June 28 meeting. Their email addresses are readily available at tinyurl.com/mtcomish.

The commissioners do not allow the opinions of non-residents of the township at their meetings. But when these elected officials consider approving a massive suburban project in the heart of America’s birthplace of the Amish, it’s a matter of county, state and national interest. The board should be aware of this concern.

The five township commissioners – four Republicans and one Democrat – campaigned for the preservation of the farms. Their actions on this issue will test their commitment to those campaign promises.

Will they be heroes who preserve the birthplace of the Amish in America? Or will they be the government agents who enable its destruction?

Ernest J. Schreiber is retired editor of the Intelligent Journal/Lancaster New Era/Sunday News, predecessor of LNP | Lancasters online.

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Dartmouth eliminates student loans for undergraduates https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/dartmouth-eliminates-student-loans-for-undergraduates/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 18:14:52 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/dartmouth-eliminates-student-loans-for-undergraduates/ Donating financial aid through The Call to Lead campaign has reinforced Dartmouth’s commitment to making a college education accessible and affordable to the most promising and talented students around the world and from all economic backgrounds. “Thanks to this extraordinary investment from our community, students can prepare for lives of impact with fewer constraints,” says […]]]>

Donating financial aid through The Call to Lead campaign has reinforced Dartmouth’s commitment to making a college education accessible and affordable to the most promising and talented students around the world and from all economic backgrounds.

“Thanks to this extraordinary investment from our community, students can prepare for lives of impact with fewer constraints,” says President Hanlon. “Eliminating loans from financial aid programs will allow Dartmouth undergraduates to pursue their purpose and passion in the widest possible range of career opportunities.”

Two recent donations capped efforts to eliminate student debt through the campaign. In May, Anne Kubik ’87, a member of the President’s Commission on Financial Aid and an early supporter of the initiative, added $10 million to an earlier pledge to bring the effort closer to reality. An anonymous donor then committed $25 million to complete the campaign, establishing one of the largest scholarship endowments in Dartmouth history.

“Our gratitude for these extraordinary acts of generosity knows no bounds,” said President Hanlon.

“Both donors have told me of their enthusiasm for ensuring that more applicants can pursue an education at Dartmouth without worrying about their financial means.”

– President Philip J. Hanlon ’77

Currently, Dartmouth undergraduates from families with annual incomes of $125,000 or less and with typical assets are offered need-based aid with no loan component required. Dartmouth now waives the loan requirement for undergraduate students from families with annual incomes over $125,000 who receive need-based financial aid. This will reduce the debt burden of hundreds of middle-income Dartmouth students and their families by an average of $22,000 over four years. This will in turn open up opportunities for recent graduates to consider career opportunities or advanced degrees that they might not otherwise have been able to pursue.

More than 65 families have supported the campaign’s goal of eliminating loan requirements from Dartmouth’s undergraduate financial aid scholarships, committing more than $80 million in donations to the endowment.

“This gift honors Dartmouth’s tradition of service,” says Kubik.

“Over the years, I’ve been fortunate to serve alongside alumni who dedicate hundreds of hours to making Dartmouth stronger for future students. The presidential commission embodied the best of this altruism of the elders. Dartmouth is more welcoming than ever because of it.

-Anne Kubik ’87

Successful applicants to the Class of 2027 will be the first undergraduate students to enroll through this historic investment in Dartmouth’s endowment.

Over the past week, members of the Dartmouth community have rallied to pledge an additional $5 million to eliminate required loans in financial aid scholarships for all current AB students, many of whom have seen their university experience disrupted by the global pandemic. President Hanlon thanked several families for their commitment to extending the no-loan policy to current students: Dana Banga and Angad Banga ’06; Leslie Davis Dahl ’85 and Robert Dahl; Katherine Dunleavy and Keith Dunleavy ’91; Karen Frank and James Frank ’65 (in honor of Peggy Epstein Tanner ’79); Julie McColl-McKenna ’89 and David McKenna ’89; Hadley Mullin ’96 and Daniel Kalafatas ’96; Robin Bryson Reynolds ’91 and Jake Reynolds ’90; and Victoria Ershova and Mike Triplett ’96.

“Dartmouth’s commitment to meeting 100% of demonstrated need for all students is longstanding and a source of pride,” says Lee Coffin, Vice Provost, Admissions and Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid. “These new policies reinforce this deep and enduring commitment to full and equal access to an education in Dartmouth. Expanding scholarships by removing loans from all aid programs further levels the playing field as we invite students from all socio-economic backgrounds to join the Dartmouth community.

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“Historic” weather: Why a cocktail of natural disasters is hitting the United States | Climate crisis in the American West https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/historic-weather-why-a-cocktail-of-natural-disasters-is-hitting-the-united-states-climate-crisis-in-the-american-west/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 21:22:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/historic-weather-why-a-cocktail-of-natural-disasters-is-hitting-the-united-states-climate-crisis-in-the-american-west/ SSummer in the American West has gotten off to an explosive start, with extreme weather events ravaging several states in recent weeks. In Montana, historic flooding has devastated communities and infrastructure in and around Yellowstone National Park and forced a rare closure. Further south, reservoirs hit new lows, triple-digit heat waves suffocated millions, and wildfires […]]]>

SSummer in the American West has gotten off to an explosive start, with extreme weather events ravaging several states in recent weeks. In Montana, historic flooding has devastated communities and infrastructure in and around Yellowstone National Park and forced a rare closure. Further south, reservoirs hit new lows, triple-digit heat waves suffocated millions, and wildfires ripped through Arizona, New Mexico, Alaska and California.

These layered catastrophes offer a glimpse of what is to come. As temperatures continue to climb, extreme events won’t just increase – they’re more likely to overlap, causing more calamity and testing the limits of the nation’s resilience and recovery.

“The United States has some capacity to deal with extreme events,” said Dr. Andrew Hoell, a meteorologist at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (Noaa) Physical Sciences Laboratory, adding that capacity is under strain. when these events reinforce each other. regional or sequential.

Natural disasters, from floods to droughts to wildfires, have always occurred in parts of the west, and it will take time for scientists to study the precise links between events such as the destruction of Yellowstone and the climate crisis. But it is clear that, in a warming world, combinations of factors are increasingly likely to align and turn routine events into disasters. So-called “compound extremes,” where a combination of contributing factors come together, are on the rise, Hoell said.

A superposition of dangerous realities

The Yellowstone flood was one of these “compound extremes”.

Global warming led to melting snow in waterways as a deluge battered the region, dropping up to three months of summer rain in just days, according to a tally by CNN . Researchers from the US Geological Survey (USGS) and two universities had previously sounded the alarm that an event like this was increasingly likely, releasing a report last year on how the climate crisis could threaten the park. Noting that average temperatures could rise by up to 10 degrees over the next few decades, they concluded that the region should expect intense dry conditions dotted with dangerous downpours.

“As global surface temperatures increase, the possibility of more droughts and increased storm intensity is likely to occur,” the USGS scientists wrote. “As more water vapor evaporates into the atmosphere, it becomes fuel for more powerful storms to develop.”

The moment a house collapses into a river as major flooding shuts down Yellowstone National Park – video

The unprecedented and sudden flood earlier this week toppled telephone poles, toppled fences, wiped out roads and bridges and threatened to cut off the supply of drinking water to the state’s largest city, after officials in Billings, Montana were forced to shut down its treatment plant.

“None of us anticipated a 500-year flood on the Yellowstone when we designed these facilities,” said Debi Meling, director of public works for the city. Remarkably, no one was injured or killed, but the damage may have been permanent and recovery could take years.

“We certainly know that climate change is causing more natural disasters, more fires, bigger fires and more floods and bigger floods,” said Robert Manning, retired professor of environment and natural resources at the University of Vermont. “These things are going to happen, and they’re probably going to happen a lot more intensely.”

composite of images showing the destruction left by the fires in New Mexico

Roll the heatwave and fire dice

Now in the third year of extremely dry conditions, about 44% of the American West has been classified as extreme drought, according to the American Drought Monitor. Once the lush hills have turned brown, the waterways have retreated into the fissured earth and the agricultural, ecological and industrial impacts are expected to increase, and swaths of the west will go without hope of precipitation through the summer and winter. fall.

This also loaded the dice for wildfires, as fires behave more erratically and become more difficult to fight. Southwestern states have been hammered by dozens of fires this spring, including a ferocious blaze in New Mexico that became the worst in state history.

The number of square miles burned so far this year is more than double the national 10-year average, and wildfires have already set records and destroyed hundreds of homes.

A water shortage emergency in Southern California has resulted in water restrictions for six million people amid drought conditions. Photography: Mario Tama/Getty Images

Destructive fires, a devastating drought and torrential floods are each disasters in their own right – but when they overlap, they are even more capable of causing calamity. Scientists say these events are happening more frequently and the climate crisis is a major culprit.

“These are three events that are all extremely consistent with our well-understood baseline expectations for climate change,” said Dr. Karen McKinnon, a climatologist and professor at the University of California, Los Angeles. She explains how when the atmosphere warms, it retains more moisture. This worsens drought conditions and sets the stage for stronger storms.

“The most fundamental influence of us putting more greenhouse gases into the atmosphere is warming temperatures,” she said. “We can say with enough confidence going forward that these types of events will simply be more likely because temperatures keep rising.”

While extreme heat makes other weather events more dangerous, it is also a deadly threat in itself. Heat waves have already taken their toll this year. Millions of people across the United States have faced sweltering spring temperatures that don’t drop overnight, increasing the risk of health damage. An LA Times investigation published last year found that heat-related deaths are woefully underreported in California and related deaths could be up to six times higher than the official tally.

“What we’re seeing is we’re just going to have more and more of these record-breaking heat waves because we’re shifting the temperatures towards warmer conditions,” McKinnon said. Scientists say heat waves are also increasing in size, affecting entire regions with greater frequency. About a third of Americans – more than 100 million people – have faced dangerous temperatures as a heatwave blanketed large swathes of the country last week.

‘The greatest crisis facing our nation’, but can the resources keep up?

Accumulating disasters have strained resources. From a severe shortage of firefighters ahead of peak times to struggling to get water usage under control, agencies are struggling to prepare for the worst effects. Patrick Roberts, a senior political scientist at the Rand Corporation who studies disasters, says many systems have improved to deal with simultaneous events, but there is still work to be done.

Flooding seen in Livingston, Montana.
Flooding seen in Livingston, Montana. Photography: William Campbell/Getty Images

“Covid has given us the experience of a national emergency,” he said, noting that although the pandemic has been disastrous, it has helped streamline national systems that never had to simultaneously respond to an event not confined to a geographic region.

Failure to prepare comes at a high cost, both financially and in the devastation caused to communities.

According to a 2019 study published by the National Institute of Building Sciences, every dollar spent on risk mitigation saves the United States $6 in future disaster costs. Last year, the United States spent an alarming $145 billion on natural disasters – the third highest amount on record – and faced 20 extreme events that cost more than $1 billion. dollars each, nearly triple the average since 1980.

The fire is still burning in the hills above Sheep Fire scorched areas in California.
The fire is still burning in the hills above Sheep Fire scorched areas in California. Photography: Etienne Laurent/EPA

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (Fema) is already preparing for an escalation in needs this year and beyond, requesting $19.7 billion for its 2023 disaster relief fund.

“The field of emergency management is at a pivotal time in its history,” Fema Administrator Deanne Criswell said during a House Homeland Security Subcommittee hearing on preparedness, emergency response and recovery. The agency is handling more than triple the number of disasters this year than a decade ago.

“Climate change is the greatest crisis facing our nation and is making natural disasters more frequent and more destructive,” Criswell said. “Although our mission itself has not changed, our operating environment has changed.”

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Colombian presidential election: what you need to know https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/colombian-presidential-election-what-you-need-to-know/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/colombian-presidential-election-what-you-need-to-know/ BOGOTÁ, Colombia – Colombia will hold a presidential election on Sunday unprecedented in its history. Voters in Latin America’s third-largest country demanded change, rejecting a political establishment that has held power here for generations. Whoever wins, the new president will announce the start of a potentially transformative era. But will the historically conservative country choose […]]]>

BOGOTÁ, Colombia – Colombia will hold a presidential election on Sunday unprecedented in its history.

Voters in Latin America’s third-largest country demanded change, rejecting a political establishment that has held power here for generations. Whoever wins, the new president will announce the start of a potentially transformative era.

But will the historically conservative country choose its first leftist president? Or will he bet on a political outsider?

The choice is between two populist candidates: Gustavo Petro, a leftist senator and former guerrilla vying for his third presidential election, or Rodolfo Hernández, an outspoken former mayor operating on an anti-corruption platform.

Sunday’s vote will be the culmination of the most tense and violent election cycle in more than a decade. Recent polls show Petro and Hernández virtually tied, raising fears that the losing candidate or his supporters could challenge the results and incite unrest.

Both candidates faced assassination threats. Petro and his running mate, Francia Márquez, participated in campaign rallies last month behind bulletproof shields. Hernández extended a trip to Florida last week and canceled all public campaign events for security reasons.

“It’s a breaking point in Colombian politics,” said Sandra Botero, a political scientist at Universidad del Rosario in Colombia. “I don’t think we’ve had an election this close and where so many issues have been at stake for decades. No matter who wins, we seem to be standing at a critical moment. »

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Boulder City Council shows support for historic district which includes Bandshell, civic area https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/boulder-city-council-shows-support-for-historic-district-which-includes-bandshell-civic-area/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 06:16:46 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/boulder-city-council-shows-support-for-historic-district-which-includes-bandshell-civic-area/ June 14—Despite a push from historic preservation advocates and community members, the historic designation boundaries of the historic Glen Huntington Bandshell will not be changed to include all of Central Park. At least not for now. After a lengthy discussion on Tuesday, a majority of the Boulder City Council decided not to approve the amendment […]]]>

June 14—Despite a push from historic preservation advocates and community members, the historic designation boundaries of the historic Glen Huntington Bandshell will not be changed to include all of Central Park.

At least not for now.

After a lengthy discussion on Tuesday, a majority of the Boulder City Council decided not to approve the amendment to the historic designation of the site at 1236 Canyon Blvd. originally approved nearly three decades ago.

The 5-4 decision went against the Landmarks Board’s recommendation in favor of the staff recommendation: instead of an expanded designation now, instead take a more holistic look at a larger, more encompassing historic district that recognizes the historic resources of the area. and the evolution of the place over time.

“It’s basically the heart of Boulder,” senior historic preservation planner James Hewat said Tuesday.

Pro Tem Mayor Rachel Friend and City Council members Mark Wallach, Tara Winer and Bob Yates were the dissenting votes. They supported the amendment at least in part because Hewat indicated there would be no harm in approving it before a more formal process to consider a more formal historic district that should start next year.

Other board members saw it differently. From their perspective, there is no sense of urgency since there is no threat to the Central Park area.

The Glen Huntington Bandshell was originally designated as a historic landmark in 1996. However, the originally approved designation does not extend much beyond the stage and seats due to the historic trains that were displayed there.

According to the staff, the intention was always to expand the boundaries so that the landmark designation includes all of Central Park.

At the public hearing, everyone was in favor of changing the historic designation.

“We believe the time is right,” Landmarks Vice-Chairman Abby Daniels said at Tuesday’s meeting.

Similarly, Kathryn Barth of Friends of the Bandshell said the band’s reason for requesting the expansion was largely practical. The group wants to ensure the site designation is joined as Boulder moves forward with projects made possible by the extension of the Community, Culture, Resilience and Safety Tax approved by voters l last fall.

“We didn’t want the Bandshell and its site to be split,” Barth said.

A number of city council members said the process was inefficient. Friend, for example, said she would prefer to move forward with expanding the historic designation to avoid spending more Council time on the subject in the future.

The reason for the recommended delay was to ensure more time for collaboration between the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board and the Landmarks Board, both of which would have a say in the historic district and any changes to the area.

The parks and recreation board was concerned about the proposal being considered by city council on Tuesday due to the lack of engagement and the timing of the discussion.

Toward the end of the discussion, Boulder City Council members gave informal instructions to planning staff to begin work on the historic district next year.

It was likely to happen anyway, staff noted.

“Frankly, we think it’s a priority,” Hewat said.

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For over 170 years, the Reynolds property has been the heart of Patrick County | VTX https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/for-over-170-years-the-reynolds-property-has-been-the-heart-of-patrick-county-vtx/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 17:27:08 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/for-over-170-years-the-reynolds-property-has-been-the-heart-of-patrick-county-vtx/ Gift The historic buildings, the catalpa, and the gentle spring where it all began endure thanks to a careful plan to preserve the Reynolds property and donate it to the university. Through collaborations between Virginia Tech and local organizations, the property remains a strength in the Patrick County community. The last descendant of the Reynolds […]]]>

Gift

The historic buildings, the catalpa, and the gentle spring where it all began endure thanks to a careful plan to preserve the Reynolds property and donate it to the university. Through collaborations between Virginia Tech and local organizations, the property remains a strength in the Patrick County community.

The last descendant of the Reynolds family left the property in the 1960s and the house sat vacant for several years until in 1967 a local schoolteacher stopped by to check and found a pony living in the house at next to the Reynolds family’s antique piano. Nannie Ruth Terry began a quest to save the historic landmark and wrote a letter to RJ’s youngest daughter, Nancy Susan Reynolds, inviting her to visit. This sparked a friendship and a plan to save the farm.

Nancy Susan Reynolds purchased the property and renovated the house and several outbuildings, including a kitchen, icehouse, creamery, and attic. Today, the restored home is filled with Reynolds family heirlooms and displays of 19th-century life.

But she had more in mind than just preserving her family’s history.

At the lawn’s grand opening in 1970, Nancy Susan Reynolds turned over the property to Virginia Tech. In doing so, she set herself a mission calling for programs designed to improve the quality of life in Patrick County “culturally, economically, and practically.”

“It’s the smartest thing she’s done. That’s what kept it going and how it stayed preserved,” said Richard S. “Major” Reynolds III, Hardin’s great-great-grandson. “If it had been passed down to the family it would inevitably have been broken, but thanks to Virginia Tech it has been preserved and has become even more important to the community.”

Today, as part of Outreach and International Affairs, the Reynolds Homestead serves as a place of learning and culture in a rural area where residents do not have easy access to theatre, art exhibits and other cultural experiences.

“Nancy Susan Reynolds realized that this community didn’t have the opportunities it had growing up. So she really weighed heavily in our mission to deliver arts, culture and history and to provide educational opportunities,” Steele said.

Today, residents of Patrick County and beyond celebrate their weddings on the farm lawn and enjoy nature along the 1 mile LEAF Trail. They attend concerts, festivals and conferences. The surrounding 780 acres of woods serve as the Reynolds Homestead Forest Resources Research Center, where Virginia Tech researchers and students study forest biology.

The long-standing ties between the Reynolds family, the university and the community remain strong with the Reynolds Farm Advisory Board, which helps guide the future of the farm.

Major Reynolds said he feels a deep connection to the property where his parents and brother, Virginia Lieutenant Governor J. Sargeant Reynolds, are buried in the family cemetery. More than 50 years ago, he listened to his brother speak at the dedication of the farm, and since then he has seen it “really become a place of good for the community”.

Over the years, the Reynolds family has continued their support, including building the Farm Community Engagement Center in 1978 and an addition in 1992. The two-story building houses several meeting spaces where community members can to gather. Educational support in the community is also supported by the Nancy Susan Reynolds Scholarships, which have helped hundreds of Patrick County high school students attend college.

“The Reynolds Homestead fits very well into the kinds of things that our family cares deeply about, like helping the community and helping people who have fewer resources,” Major Reynolds said. “I think Nancy would be very happy to see it as it is today. She would see it as a very important part of her heritage.

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Flagler County at the Crossroads: Community or Concrete Jungle? https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/flagler-county-at-the-crossroads-community-or-concrete-jungle/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 21:10:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/flagler-county-at-the-crossroads-community-or-concrete-jungle/ by: Ed Siarkowicz President, Flagler County Historical Society I first moved to Florida in 1992. Royal Palm Beach was a small community nestled in the woods and swamps between bustling West Palm Beach and a place called Loxahatchee, which was as “country” as it gets. “At the outset, I invite you to think about American […]]]>

by: Ed Siarkowicz

President, Flagler County Historical Society

I first moved to Florida in 1992. Royal Palm Beach was a small community nestled in the woods and swamps between bustling West Palm Beach and a place called Loxahatchee, which was as “country” as it gets.

“At the outset, I invite you to think about American history in a whole new way: not as a series of ‘lessons’ with dates, names and events to memorize and ‘recite’, but as a story from the past that will help you understand the world in which you live.

– David Saville Muzzey, Governor Morris Professor, Columbia University, 1945

The Palms West Chamber of Commerce has been the driving force behind the promotion and development of the community. They had very smart and talented people working for them who were determined to promote the area – attracting business, developing the economy and promoting recreational areas.

In 1995 I moved to St. Augustine.

South Florida was just too hot for my New York blood, and St. Augustine had a sentimental vibe about it as a childhood vacation destination.

A few years later, I started hearing from friends I had made at the Palms West Chamber of Commerce. “We are thinking of moving, how is Saint-Augustin?” they all asked.

After telling them about the story, character and vibe, I asked the question, “Why do you want to move?” »

Their collective responses still frustrate me today. “The Royal Palm Beach is no longer what it used to be. The trees have all disappeared. It’s one mall after another with no sense of character. The charm disappeared, the population exploded and crime increased. That’s not why we moved here. It’s time to find another place to call home.

The first thing that came to mind was grasshoppers.

They descend, they take what they want, and when their resources are depleted, they move on to the next location, leaving behind a trail of destruction in an area that will never be the same again.

Archaeological remains of the St. Joseph Plantation documented by scouts in the 1960s. The location is now the site of ABC Fine Wine & Spirits. Courtesy picture

Flagler County’s history is as old as the Earth itself. Prehistorically, woolly mammoths, mastodons, giant ground sloths, smilodons (saber-toothed tigers) and Volkswagen Beetle-sized armadillos crashed through some of the same foliage you see growing in your backyard. . Megalodon sharks swam in the oceans. They ate great white sharks. We know we have these things because their remains have been found along creek banks, in C-section canals, and in piles of dirt emerging from holes dug for retention ponds, swimming pools, and fence posts. .

We are not the first humans here. Native Americans hunted, fished, collected, cooked and buried their dead here 15,000 years ago. We know they were here because their spearheads, arrowheads, pottery and burial mounds have been found in the same places as prehistoric creatures. Just two years ago, a spearhead the size of the palm of your hand was brought to the Historical Society. It came out of a fence post hole in St. Johns Park – still razor sharp. It was dated between 5,000 and 7,000 years ago.

ITT and Garfield were not the first modern settlers in our area. What is now Flagler County began as the breadbasket of the Spanish military fort of St. Augustine in the 1500s. Pedro Menendez de Aviles led a reconnaissance party to our coquina ridge just east of Old Kings Road, September 1565. He was looking for French sailors who had settled in local Native American villages after being shipwrecked by a hurricane en route to attack St. Augustine. We have a 58-year-old urban legend of a group of high school kids who spotted “conquistador armor” in Graham Swamp that we’re working to validate.

King George III’s chief cartographer, Johann Wilhem Gerard De Brahm, came to our area in 1765 to map, record resources and befriend native peoples after England took control of Florida on Spain.

Hewitt’s 1770 sawmill and dam cut the timber to build the homes that housed 20,000 British Loyalists in St. Augustine who had fled the 13 northern colonies during the American Revolution.

With the construction of Kings Road from Cowford (Jacksonville) to the Turnbull Colony (New Smyrna Beach), plantations sprung up to grow indigo, Sea Island cotton, and sugar cane.

Enslaved African Americans were brought here by the British during what was a horrific time in history. Their stories of life, death, escape and expertise in carpentry, cattle ranching, rice cultivation and the chemistry of sugar production resonate through our lands and forests.

These stories must be told by their descendants to teach people today layers of history so that THAT history will never repeat itself. We feel we have enough evidence from Bulow Plantation to extend the historic Gullah Geechie Corridor into Flagler County.

Native American tribes, fed up with Europeans in the 1830s, began burning their plantations, which led to the Seminole Wars, which led to the Indian Removal Act and the Trail of Tears.

Osceola traveled through our lands en route to his capture under a White Flag of Truce near Fort Peyton, St. Augustine.

The Civil War, the land booms of the early 1900s, women’s suffrage, racial injustices, agriculture and the ITT era – our story is endless in its good and its bad. These are all teachable lessons that can educate young people and their families and enrich the community.

The past must be brought back to the present.

Flagler County is at a crossroads. We are currently experiencing one of the greatest development booms in our history.

Do we plow it or search for artifacts through archaeologists who can tell the story of our local heritage and embed history kiosks in business districts?

Are we clear cutting or preserving historic green spaces that are tax deductible for developers through organizations such as the Florida Trust for Historic Preservation?

Do we make our money building cookie-cutter anesthetic communities and strip malls, or do we consult archaeological studies and historians to find out not what we can do, but how we can enrich the community and create opportunities for educational experiences linked to existing walking and cycling paths?

Have we become known only for our beaches and have to shut down tourism when the next hurricane shuts down A1A for eight months, or are we capitalizing on everything Flagler County has to offer?

Are we fighting our growing pains on social media where nothing is doing anything to make a difference, or are we showing up to city council and county commission meetings excited to let our elected officials know what’s going on going on in the minds and hearts of their constituents? Are we a divided and falling house, or are we united to maintain an agreed quality of life?

Flagler County is at a crossroads.

Will your actions or inactions now turn THIS community into the place you’ll want to live in 20 years from now, or will you go in search of a new “scenic” place to retire when Flagler County loses its appeal ?

Decide now what tomorrow will look like.

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A historic opportunity for Africa https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/a-historic-opportunity-for-africa/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 09:31:19 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/a-historic-opportunity-for-africa/ Last November, the gas was on the verge of being banned, with many voices calling for the reduction of subsidies granted to its production at the COP26 climate forum. Three months later, at the beginning of February, the European Commission enshrines gas, which emits twice as much greenhouse gas as coal and 30% less than […]]]>

Last November, the gas was on the verge of being banned, with many voices calling for the reduction of subsidies granted to its production at the COP26 climate forum. Three months later, at the beginning of February, the European Commission enshrines gas, which emits twice as much greenhouse gas as coal and 30% less than oil, as “transition energy”, and qualifies it as “green”. » for the needs of gas-fired power plants. investments in power plants under certain conditions.

Three weeks later, Russia launched a full-scale invasion of Ukraine, drawing worldwide condemnation and destabilizing energy markets. With Russia supplying 40% of the EU’s gas needs, the power source has found itself at the center of diplomatic wrangling, fueled by repeated threats from Moscow to cut off supplies.

European countries reacted differently to the impending threat.

A varied response

While Germany suffered weeks of domestic political turmoil over its dependence on Russia, Italy was quicker to respond, immediately looking south for an alternative to eastern gas. The Mediterranean nation, which gets 45% of its gas from Russia, has already signed supply deals with Algeria, Egypt, the Republic of Congo and Angola to try to limit that amount.

Gas financing, which had become scarce in recent years, is suddenly finding its way to Africa. Even before this reversal, a study by the Norwegian firm Rystad Energy published last February estimated that the continent, whose coasts are rich in natural gas deposits, could see its double production from 1.3 million to 2.7 million barrels of oil equivalent by 2030.

The European volte-face on gas holds great promise for Africa but is also a further reminder of the continent’s potential in the process of energy transition and the fight against climate change. Its main asset consists of mining resources such as cobalt, copper, graphite, nickel, aluminum or lithium, which constitute the basic elements of an energy transition that is particularly heavy on metals. A solar power plant requires three times as much metal as a gas turbine to produce one terawatt of electricity, while a wind farm uses four times as much. From Guinea to Tanzania, via Gabon, South Africa and Zambia, these “green” metals, which are also essential components in the manufacture of batteries for electric vehicles, are present in abundance.

Best foot forward

Then there is its hydrogen production potential. Reasonable land costs, sunshine and proximity to Europe with its growing demand should in theory allow it to ensure large-scale hydrogen production at a competitive price. There are already a dozen green hydrogen projects under development in countries like Egypt, Namibia and Mauritania. Admittedly, hydrogen is still years away from becoming a profitable and sufficient energy carrier, but a new window is opening.

These new places, however, are not the “new pathways to African prosperity” that organizations like the Africa CEO Forum are calling for. If this promised windfall is good news at the end of a period that has strongly affected the continent’s public finances, Africa must not repeat the mistakes of the past by betting its future on raw materials. The global market for electric vehicles, which are particularly heavy on cobalt, could represent more than 1,300 billion dollars by 2030, or just under a third of the GDP of Africa as a whole in 2021. Governments and Economic leaders must seize the opportunity of this emerging industry. and reflect on the best strategy to capture part of this added value on African soil. Although ambitious, such a plan is far from impossible.

According to UNECA, producing batteries in the DRC would cost 30% less than in the United States, and 20% less than in China. South Africa and Morocco have already embarked on the production of electric vehicles. According to different estimates, Africa would need more than 2 million trucks to make the African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA) effective. “Why wouldn’t these trucks be electric trucks produced in Africa? recently wondered Dr. Vera Songwe, Secretary-General of ECA. Similarly, the strong comeback of African gas in world politics must serve the electrification of the continent. African leaders can now ensure that this local dimension exists in gas projects; rather than committing to projects that ignore the socio-economic impact, international financiers could grant preferential conditions to more virtuous ambitions.

Finally, Africa must defend its interests and make its voice heard to fight against the establishment in Europe and the United States of new tariff barriers in the name of the environment. These protectionist strategies, perceived by some in Brussels and Washington as easy ways to wash the Western conscience, only hinder the investment capacity of African companies and make the transition even more difficult.

“Historical chance”

In these battles, the development of the infrastructures essential to the emergence of regional markets of sufficient size will be key. Resolute and continued political leadership will also be essential. In a recent development on this front, the DRC and Zambia signed a cooperation agreement last April which aims to facilitate the development of the electric battery value chain on their soil.

This global green transition is a multifaceted generational opportunity for Africa, a historic opportunity. Its mineral, gas, renewable energy, green hydrogen and forest heritage resources must contribute to the industrial transformation that it has not yet achieved. The process is expected to continue to accelerate, in part due to the increased accessibility of cutting-edge technological breakthroughs available worldwide.

COP27 will take place next November in Cairo and presents itself as a perfect opportunity for the continent to move forward in this direction and contribute to reconciling energy transition and economic transformation. It is up to the continent, especially its pan-African investors and national champions, to find a delicate balance: make green transformation a source of growth and industrial transformation, and make its deposits the source of local and regional development. After two years of a pandemic that has destabilized economies, and as a raging war has put economic sovereignty back in the spotlight, the continent’s ambition to create new paths to prosperity is strong.

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Senators call for big federal funding boost https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/senators-call-for-big-federal-funding-boost/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 09:01:33 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/senators-call-for-big-federal-funding-boost/ More than $90 million for Chesapeake Bay conservation and $440 million in drinking water subsidies is what eight US senators are asking for amid declining crab populations. In a May 6 letter to the appropriations subcommittee on interior, environment and related agencies, nine programs aimed at bay conservation and clean water initiatives were set as […]]]>
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