Historic Resources – Hamline Midway History http://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 18:05:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/hamline-midway-history-icon-150x150.jpg Historic Resources – Hamline Midway History http://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/ 32 32 How did this 600-year-old English coin end up in Newfoundland? | Smart News https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/how-did-this-600-year-old-english-coin-end-up-in-newfoundland-smart-news/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 18:05:46 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/how-did-this-600-year-old-english-coin-end-up-in-newfoundland-smart-news/ The quarter noble Henry VI was minted in London between 1422 and 1427. Courtesy of the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador Over the summer, an amateur historian in Newfoundland unearthed a 600-year-old gold coin. According to government officials, who announced the find in a statement earlier this month, it was minted in London between 1422 […]]]>

The quarter noble Henry VI was minted in London between 1422 and 1427.
Courtesy of the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador

Over the summer, an amateur historian in Newfoundland unearthed a 600-year-old gold coin. According to government officials, who announced the find in a statement earlier this month, it was minted in London between 1422 and 1427, and may be the oldest English coin ever found in Canada. .

After making the find, history buff Edward Hynes reported the piece to government officials, as required by the province’s Historic Resources Act.

“I commend Mr. Hynes for recognizing the importance of protecting Newfoundland and Labrador’s heritage resources by reporting his discovery of this very rare artifact, and I encourage others to follow his example,” said Steve Crocker, Provincial Minister of Tourism, Culture, Arts and Culture. recreation, said in the release.

The piece was found in excellent condition. “He came out of the ground looking like he was kicked yesterday,” provincial archaeologist Jamie Brake told CBC News’ Andrew Hawthorn.

After consulting Paul Berry, former curator of the Bank of Canada’s Currency Museum, officials determined that the coin dated back to the reign of Henry VI. Known as a noble quarter, it would have been worth 1 shilling 8 pence, a large sum of money in the 1400s.

Henry VI noble district

On both sides of the noble district Henri VI

Courtesy of the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador

The discovery comes about a year after a silver coin was unearthed in Newfoundland at Cupids Cove Plantation Provincial Historic Site, a former English settlement. Experts have identified the silver coin as a half-groat dating to the reign of Henry VII, the first Tudor king of England who reigned from 1485 to 1509. “Some artifacts are important for what they tell us about a site, while others are important because they spark the imagination,” archaeologist William Gilbert, who discovered the site in 1995, said in a statement last year. one of these. We can’t help but wonder about the road traveled.

The newly discovered gold coin was found somewhere along the southern coast of Newfoundland, although officials are not disclosing the exact location to avoid attracting treasure hunters, Brake told the Press. Canadian..

The noble quarter was minted about 70 years before explorer John Cabot arrived in Newfoundland in 1497. However, that doesn’t mean the coin itself arrived before Cabot, Brake adds. The owner of the coin could have brought it later.

How the piece got to the coast of Newfoundland will likely remain a mystery; in the meantime, analysis is ongoing and a more formal archaeological dig may take place later, Brake told CBC News. Once research is complete, the piece will likely go on display at The Rooms, a natural and cultural history museum in the province.

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Historical surplus and property taxes cause disagreement in the Texas Capitol https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/historical-surplus-and-property-taxes-cause-disagreement-in-the-texas-capitol/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 11:07:11 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/historical-surplus-and-property-taxes-cause-disagreement-in-the-texas-capitol/ Austin, TX, 2 minutes ago — The Texas legislature is ready to fight over how to spend the money it expects to rake in from record inflation-linked consumption tax revenue. Trying to run the Legislative Assembly and the Texas House is often like breeding cats – 150 members with 150 different ideas about how the […]]]>
The Texas legislature is ready to fight over how to spend the money it expects to rake in from record inflation-linked consumption tax revenue.

Trying to run the Legislative Assembly and the Texas House is often like breeding cats – 150 members with 150 different ideas about how the $27 billion planned the excess must be allocated.

Controller Hegar noted this week that the total could increase further by the new year. It will provide an updated estimate of certified revenue in January.

Whether it grows or not, the sum will be a big pot with which the Legislative Body can do much.

The main suggestion is to reduce property taxes by stepping up the compression of ad valorem local tax rates.

Governor Greg Abbott has call for spend “at least half” on “the largest property tax cut ever in Texas history.” Lieutenant Governor Dan Patrick first called for $4 billion to be used to cut taxes, then increased that amount to maybe more than half of the total.

The Legislature already has $3 billion Reserve for redemption next semester from remaining American Rescue Plan Act funds.

Over the weekend, state representative Carrie Isaac Told a rally at the conservative Texas Public Policy Foundation (TPPF) that it wants to see all surplus used to buy back property taxes in the state.

This prompted a response from President Dade Phelan (R-Beaumont), who said to the Transportation Advocacy Group, “I know there are a lot of politicians walking around saying ‘We need to spend half of this revenue’ – and I have elected officials who haven’t even taken an oath to say we We have to spend all the revenue on property tax relief.

“Let me remind you: none of this money came from property taxes, it all came from sales tax… So whatever we do on property taxes… I just want to remind everyone that this money is in our coffers because of inflation, because [financial] pain.”

He added that the state should “look at more than just property tax relief” and pointed to potential sales and franchise tax relief.

“Whatever we do on property taxes, we have to do it every session or we raise your taxes.”

State Representative Tony Tinerholt (R-Arlington), who is hard Phelan for the presidency, critical Phelan’s comments, saying, “It is honestly shocking to see President Phelan speaking out so strongly against property tax relief and even criticizing new Conservative lawmakers for supporting bold property tax relief.”

Tinderholt then called for a change in the tax status quo: “The Texas Republican platform is asking us to move away from the broken property tax system and move on to sales taxes. This year offers a historic opportunity to do just that and yet our current speaker criticizes incoming freshmen for supporting Republican politics.

The Texas school funding system acts like a seesaw, with state funding on one side and local property taxes on the other. Compression refers to an injection of public funds to lower the local rate side of the equation.

But this is done on a biennial basis through an appropriation in each new budget, and is permanent only to the extent the legislature is willing to appropriate the money.

A more permanent reform of property taxation would require the state, to some extent, to replace the financing currently provided by ad valorem taxes. Such an idea has been widely received Support of Abbott: to eliminate the school district’s maintenance and operations tax rate, the largest component of property tax bills.

One way to do this, proposed by TPPF, is to use $0.90 of each excess dollar to buy back M&O rates from ISD until it is fully phased out. A few bills to accomplish that have already been deposit during the first week of pre-deposit before the 88e Legislative session.

The caveat is that consumption taxes are more volatile.

Just as the state has seen record collections, this shouldn’t last forever. Texas has a strong economic engine, but there’s no guarantee its future will be all rosy — the state is just two years away from a huge $4.6 billion budget deficit projection caused by the pandemic and government-mandated closures.

In his speech, Phelan indicated that state agencies, like the Texas Department of Transportation, will be asking for significantly more funding due to inflation driving up the cost of materials like asphalt.

“I think this is a unique opportunity to use some of these resources for infrastructure,” he added. “If we want to be competitive and attract new, job-creating businesses as we do every day, we need to invest in our infrastructure.”

Road, water, broadband and education infrastructure are front and center for some of the surplus, Phelan said.

When the Legislative Assembly reconvenes in January, different interests will fight over the amount of money. But as Phelan described in his talk, that can evaporate pretty quickly.

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Planning commission approves demolition of Beth El Temple https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/planning-commission-approves-demolition-of-beth-el-temple/ Fri, 18 Nov 2022 12:01:32 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/planning-commission-approves-demolition-of-beth-el-temple/ Over the objections of historic conservators, the Planning Commission approved a permit to demolish Temple Beth El and three related religious buildings at 1317 Crescent Heights to make way for a five-story, 90-unit multi-family residential building. Built between 1952 and 1968 to house the temple, the complex was purchased by the Iranian-American Jewish Center in […]]]>

Over the objections of historic conservators, the Planning Commission approved a permit to demolish Temple Beth El and three related religious buildings at 1317 Crescent Heights to make way for a five-story, 90-unit multi-family residential building.

Built between 1952 and 1968 to house the temple, the complex was purchased by the Iranian-American Jewish Center in 1997 and extensively renovated three years later.

The staff report barely touches on the complex’s history: “The existing church built in 1952 was reviewed in the 2016 citywide Commercial Historic Resource Survey and found to be ineligible for be designated as a national or local cultural resource.”

Antiques dealer Lynn Russell wrote to the commission expressing her concerns.

“Although the property was reviewed during the business survey, it surprisingly received a 6Z status code, a possible result of some arbitrary factors,” she wrote. (“6Z” is a code indicating that it is not eligible for historical designation by survey assessment). “Beyond investigation, a property of this architectural stature, and as a religious facility, rightly deserves an individual cultural assessment that makes it theoretically clear to the general public and more specifically to the surrounding neighborhood. This was not properly executed, in this case perhaps in part due to the recent pandemic and factors of inaccurate and possibly arbitrary actions during a review process that should be more phased with the correct procedure.

Victor Omelczenko, chairman of the board of the West Hollywood Preservation Alliance, also expressed reservations.

“Something is wrong here,” Omelczenko said. “Temple Beth-El, along with the other three structures, warrants the completion of a specific Historic Resource Assessment (HRA) before any decisions are made regarding the four demolitions.”

Commissioner’s Chair Stacey Jones denied the extension requests.

“Disagreement with the assessment of the professionals we have on staff is not grounds for holding,” Jones said. “And if a person who is a professional as a historical consultant says that this property does not meet the criteria for historical designation and the staff agrees that it does not either, then I tend to be okay with people who are paid to do this. it to live.

The project can still be appealed to the municipal council.

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Nationally recognized architect helping to preserve historic black sites https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/nationally-recognized-architect-helping-to-preserve-historic-black-sites/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 23:26:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/nationally-recognized-architect-helping-to-preserve-historic-black-sites/ EFFORTS TO PRESERVE HISTORIC BLACK SITES. WHAT WE APPROVED SHE ATE IS OFTEN WHAT BRANT LEGGS, A NATIONALLY RECOGNIZED ARCHITECTURAL HISTORIAN, SAYS. AMERICANS HAVE NOT ALWAYS SEEN THE VALUE OF BENCHMARKS LINKED TO THE AFRICAN-AMERICAN EXPERIENCE. I THINK OUR NATION HAS NOT YET REVERENCE FOR BLACK HISTORY AS AMERICAN HISTORY SO THIS LACK OF REVERENCE […]]]>

EFFORTS TO PRESERVE HISTORIC BLACK SITES. WHAT WE APPROVED SHE ATE IS OFTEN WHAT BRANT LEGGS, A NATIONALLY RECOGNIZED ARCHITECTURAL HISTORIAN, SAYS. AMERICANS HAVE NOT ALWAYS SEEN THE VALUE OF BENCHMARKS LINKED TO THE AFRICAN-AMERICAN EXPERIENCE. I THINK OUR NATION HAS NOT YET REVERENCE FOR BLACK HISTORY AS AMERICAN HISTORY SO THIS LACK OF REVERENCE IS REFLECTED IN THE WAY WE FINALLY RESPONDED TO IMPORTANT MONUMENTS IN BLACK HISTORY, THE WAY WE HAVE DIRECTED RESOURCES TO ESTABLISH AND MAINTAIN CONFEDERATE MONUMENTS. IN HIS ROLE AS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE AFRICAN-AMERICAN CULTURAL HERITAGE ACTION FUND, PART OF THE NATIONAL TRUST FOR HISTORICAL PRESERVATION, LEGGS TRAVELS ACROSS THE COUNTRY TO MAINTAIN THE RICH HISTORY OF PLACES LIKE BIRMINGHAM BAPTIST CHURCH 16TH STREET. MAKE YOURSELVES AT HOME. HE IS NO STRANGER FOR. THE 2015 MAGIC CITY AND LEGS LEARN A PLAN TO DEMOLISH THE MOTEL AG GASTON, LISTED IN THE FABLED BOOK. THE MOTEL WAS A PLACE WHERE AFRICAN-AMERICANS CAN STAY WHEN TRAVELING WOMEN, OFTEN VIOLENT AND SICK, IN THE DEEP SOUTH AT THE HEIGHT OF SEGREGATION. IT ALSO SERVED AS THE LOCAL HEADQUARTERS OF THE CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT. WE ASK PRESIDENT OBAMA TO DESIGNATE BIRMINGHAM RIGHTS NATIONAL HISTORIC. HE MET WITH CITY LEADERS, INCLUDING MAYOR WILLIAM, WHICH RESULTED IN THE MOTEL BEING LISTED AS ONE OF GEORGIA’S 11 MOST ENDANGERED HISTORIC PLACES. AND WAS JUST HERE IN BIRMINGHAM A FEW MONTHS AGO AT THE RIBBON CUTTING CEREMONY FOR THE RESTORATION AND PARTIAL RESTORATION OF THE GASTON MOTEL. AND THIS PLACE HAS A BRIGHT FUTURE. IN 17, THE OBAMA ADMINISTRATION WOULD ESTABLISH AND INCLUDE THE MOTEL IN THE BIRMINGHAM CIVIL NATIONAL MONUMENT. BUT THIS PROJECT IS ONE OF MANY EXAMPLES ACROSS THE COUNTRY, PLACES THAT ARE REALLY IN AMERICAN HISTORY HAVE BEEN VACANT. HAVE LOTS OF DEFERRED MAINTENANCE AND MANY WAYS THEY SIT AT THE SIGHT SEEMING TO EXIST WITHOUT MEANING. AS A STUDENT AT THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY. THE PADUCAH NATIVE TALKS ON A BRIEF CONVERSATION WITH THE PRESIDENT OF THE HISTORY GRADUATE PROGRAM. ERIC PRESERVATION HAS PAINTED A STUNNING PICTURE OF AFRICAN-AMERICAN INFLUENCE IN THE HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE, PAVING THE CAPE FOR HIS FUTURE CAREER. AND WHEN I REALIZED BOOKER T WASHINGTON WORKING AT TUSKEGEE UNIVERSITY CITY HERE IN ALABAMA IN 1912, BORN FROM HIS BRILLIANT MIND, DEVELOPED A SOCIAL IN RESPONSE TO A CRISIS IN BLACK EDUCATION THAT HE UNDERSTOOD THAT BLACK CHILDREN DESERVE A HIGHER QUALITY OF EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES AND THAT AMERICA’S FIRST PROFESSIONAL BLACK ARCHITECT, ROBERT TAYLOR, DESIGNED THE PLANS FOR THE SCHOOL THAT DR. GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER, THE DE FACTO LANDSCAPE DESIGNER, AND THAT WASHINGTON WOULD PARTNER WITH JULIUS ROSENWALD, WHO AT THE TIME WAS THE SECOND PRESIDENT OF SEARS AND ROEBUCK. AND TOGETHER THEY WILL HELP FUND THE CONSTRUCTION OF MORE THAN 5,000 SCHOOL BUILDINGS IN 15 SOUTHERN STATES. AND I LEARNED THAT MY MOTHER AND MY FATHER, THROUGH THIS RESEARCH PROCESS, I LEARNED THAT MY MOTHER AND MY FATHER GO TO SCHOOL. SO I UNDERSTOOD AT A GLANCE THAT THE JOB WAS NOT JUST ABOUT TELLING STORIES OR PRESENTING MISUNDERSTOODS, BUT THAT IT WAS PERSONAL AND I HAD THE OPPORTUNITY EARLY To

Nationally renowned architect leads call to preserve Birmingham’s historic black sites

What we appreciate is often what we preserve, and nationally renowned architectural historian Brent Leggs says Americans haven’t always seen the value in monuments related to the African-American experience. “, Leggs said. “So that lack of respect is reflected in the way we have funded important monuments in black history. The way we directed resources to establish and maintain Confederate monuments.” In his role as executive director of the African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund, part of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, Leggs travels the country leading efforts to maintain the rich history of places like Birmingham’s 16th Street Baptist Church. Leggs was no stranger to the Magic City. In 2015, he learned of a plan to demolish the AG Gaston Motel. Listed in the legendary Green Book, the motel was a place for African Americans to stay as they roamed the often violent and unwelcoming Deep South during the height of segregation, and served as the local headquarters of the rights movement He met with city leaders, including then-Mayor William Bell, which led to the motel being listed as one of the 11 most endangered historic places in the country.” And I was just here in Birmingham a few months ago at the groundbreaking ceremony for the refurbishment, partial refurbishment, of the Motel AG Gaston,” he said. “This place has a bright future ahead of it.” In 2017, the Obama administration created and included the motel in the Birmingham Civil Rights National Monument. “This project is one of many examples across the country where really important places in American history had been vacant, had a lot of deferred maintenance,” Leggs said. “In many ways, they’re sitting at for all to see, seeming to exist without history or meaning.” As a student at the University of Kentucky, the Paducah native, says a brief conversation with the chair of the historic preservation graduate program painted a stunning picture of African-American influence in the history of architecture, setting the stage for his future career. here in Alabama in 1912, born in his brilliant mind, developed a social movement in response to a crisis in black education. That he understood that black children deserve the highest quality of education. cation facilities. And that America’s first professional black architect, Robert Taylor, would design the plans for the school, and that Dr. George Washington Carver was the de facto landscape designer,” he said. “And that Washington would partner to Julius Rosenwald, who at the time was the second president of Sears and Roebuck. And together, they would help fund the construction of more than 5,000 school buildings in 15 southern states,” Leggs continued. “And I learned that my mother and my father, through this research process; I learned that my mother and father attended schools in Rosenwald! So all of a sudden I understood that the job was not just about telling stories or presenting stories forgotten in history, but that it was personal,” he said. “And that I had the opportunity to literally preserve the physical evidence of our past. .”

What we appreciate is often what we preserve, and nationally renowned architectural historian Brent Leggs says Americans haven’t always seen the value in monuments related to the African-American experience.

“I think our nation still has respect for black history as American history,” Leggs said. “So that disrespect is reflected in the way we’ve funded monuments significant in black history. The way we’ve directed resources to establish and maintain Confederate monuments.”

In his role as executive director of the African American Cultural Heritage Action Fund, part of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, Leggs travels the country leading efforts to maintain the rich history of places like the Baptist Church in Birmingham’s 16th Street.

Leggs is no stranger to the Magic City. In 2015, he became aware of a project to demolish the AG Gaston motel. Listed in the legendary Green Book, the motel was a place for African Americans to stay as they traveled the often violent and unwelcoming Deep South during the height of segregation. It also served as the local headquarters of the civil rights movement. He met with city leaders, including then-mayor William Bell, which led to the motel being listed as one of the 11 most endangered historic places in the country.

“And I was just here in Birmingham a few months ago at the groundbreaking ceremony for the restoration, partial restoration, of the AG Gaston Motel,” he said. “This place has a bright future ahead of it.”

In 2017, the Obama administration created and included the motel in the Birmingham Civil Rights National Monument.

“This project is one of many examples across the country where places that are really important in American history were vacant, had a lot of deferred maintenance,” Leggs said. “In many ways they sit in full view, seeming to exist without history or meaning.”

As a student at the University of Kentucky, the Paducah native said a brief conversation with the chair of the historic preservation graduate program painted a stunning picture of African-American influence in history. history of architecture, paving the way for his future career.

“When I realized that Booker T. Washington, working at Tuskegee University right here in Alabama, in 1912, born into his brilliant mind, developed a social movement in response to a crisis in black education. he understood that black children deserve the highest quality of educational institutions. And that America’s first professional black architect, Robert Taylor, would design the plans for the school, and that Dr. George Washington Carver was the landscape designer. de facto,” he said. “And that Washington would partner with Julius Rosenwald, who at the time was the second president of Sears and Roebuck. And together they would help fund the construction of more than 5,000 school buildings in 15 southern states,” continued Leggings.

“And I learned that my mother and my father, through this research process; I learned that my mother and my father attended the Rosenwald schools! So all of a sudden I understood that the work wasn’t just about telling stories or presenting stories that were overlooked in history, but it was personal,” he said. “And that I had the opportunity to literally preserve the physical evidence of our past.”

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A memo from the Mich. GOP gives scathing postmortem on Trump-backed candidates https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/a-memo-from-the-mich-gop-gives-scathing-postmortem-on-trump-backed-candidates/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 23:14:05 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/a-memo-from-the-mich-gop-gives-scathing-postmortem-on-trump-backed-candidates/ LANSING — Michigan’s Republican Party suffered historic losses on Tuesday due to bad candidates closely linked to former President Donald Trump who turned away major donors, the party’s chief of staff said in a scathing post-election memo obtained by the Free Press. “As a Party, we have found ourselves constantly navigating the power struggle between […]]]>

LANSING — Michigan’s Republican Party suffered historic losses on Tuesday due to bad candidates closely linked to former President Donald Trump who turned away major donors, the party’s chief of staff said in a scathing post-election memo obtained by the Free Press.

“As a Party, we have found ourselves constantly navigating the power struggle between Trump and anti-Trump factions in the Party, primarily within the donor class,” Paul Cordes said in Thursday’s memo.

“This power struggle ended with too many on the sidelines and hurt Republicans in key races. Ultimately, high-quality, substantial candidates and well-funded campaigns are still essential to winning the elections. at the expense of Michiganders across the state.”

Republican gubernatorial candidate Tudor Dixon, with a weak identity, no campaign money and no political experience, had to ‘start from scratch’ after the primary, while Governor Gretchen Whitmer and her allies sat on tens of millions of dollars, which they used to attack her on her abortion stance through television ads, with devastating effect, Cordes said in the memo.

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UTSA strengthens its Westside ties with an oral tradition of Hispanic culture | UTSA today | UTSA https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/utsa-strengthens-its-westside-ties-with-an-oral-tradition-of-hispanic-culture-utsa-today-utsa/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 16:20:24 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/utsa-strengthens-its-westside-ties-with-an-oral-tradition-of-hispanic-culture-utsa-today-utsa/ The symposium marks one of the latest outreach efforts of the Westside Community Partnerships Initiative and one of many neighborhood initiatives of UTSA’s Office of Community Relations. The goal of Westside Partnerships is to improve the lives of families living in San Antonio’s Westside by investing in the preservation of rich heritage while helping residents […]]]>

The symposium marks one of the latest outreach efforts of the Westside Community Partnerships Initiative and one of many neighborhood initiatives of UTSA’s Office of Community Relations. The goal of Westside Partnerships is to improve the lives of families living in San Antonio’s Westside by investing in the preservation of rich heritage while helping residents meet their most stubborn challenges.

“It’s important that UTSA, as a model institution serving Hispanics, examines the challenges and opportunities in communities like the Westside,” Enriquez said.

The event is also aligned with the university’s commitment to ensuring that residents and business owners of this culturally rich community prosper, according to UTSA’s Vice President for University Relations. Teresa Nino.

“UTSA is dedicated to amplifying the economic and cultural assets of San Antonio’s historic Westside,” she said. “The university has a vital role to play in fostering the spirit of innovation and entrepreneurship in this community. We want to be the tide that lifts all boats.

President of UTSA Taylor Eighty, with rep. Joaquin Castrowill speak at the opening session of the symposium.

Eightmy led efforts to create the Westside Initiative and the Westside Community Center, both launched in 2019.

The Center was established in August of the same year to bring together city stakeholders and serve as a hub for community research. Meanwhile, the Westside Initiative, launched this fall, has fostered meaningful relationships with Westside residents and business owners, sparking vital economic opportunities and partnerships in the community.

Both programs are also part of Eightmy’s strategic initiative to make UTSA a city-serving university, which requires the institution to deepen its ties to all areas of San Antonio, especially neighborhoods historically underserved.

The symposium will be a great opportunity for vital community voices to tell their stories. Attendees will hear from Chicano movement activists who fought against the oppression of West Side residents and beyond. They’ll also hear about the West Side Sound, an enduring fusion of jazz, R&B and Tejano music that grew out of the community as early as the 1950s – as told by artists at the forefront of the scene.

For many of these people, success was rooted in finding ways to cope when times were tough, Enriquez said.

The narrow, rectangular residences known as shotgun houses, for example, testify to the determination of Westside residents who were unable to secure bank loans to become homeowners.

“They would buy a narrow lot and a lumber kit on credit, and the community would help build the house,” Enriquez said.

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Condor Club wants legacy company status, but disguises itself as https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/condor-club-wants-legacy-company-status-but-disguises-itself-as/ Wed, 02 Nov 2022 23:54:29 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/condor-club-wants-legacy-company-status-but-disguises-itself-as/ Inclusion in the San Francisco Legacy Business Registry is an honor given to many of our favorite local businesses that have been around for 30 years or more. This honor has been bestowed upon legendary bars and restaurants, recording studios, or even highly regarded courier and PO box companies. But the Chronicle reported that today […]]]>

Inclusion in the San Francisco Legacy Business Registry is an honor given to many of our favorite local businesses that have been around for 30 years or more. This honor has been bestowed upon legendary bars and restaurants, recording studios, or even highly regarded courier and PO box companies.

But the Chronicle reported that today the SF Historic Preservation Commission is considering a Legacy Business designation for the North Beach strip club, the Condor Club. And although this club is considered the first topless bar in the United States, the nomination led to an intense debate on the question of whether the city should provide funds and resources to a strip club whose the heritage is richer in sexism than in culture.

Several current and former Condor employees (all male) spoke highly of the club’s place in San Francisco history and culture. “The Condor is a mainstay of the community in North Beach,” Derek Thompston, a longtime Condor Club employee, told the commission, saying perhaps too accurately, “It gives people a safe haven for go relieve their tension.”

But the commissioners noted the club’s history of “operating for profit”, and said the club’s application showed no evidence that women had ever been promoted beyond dancing or bartending. The commissioners noted that the Condor was a place “where employment or promotion depended on sexual parameters”.

Yes, the club was the launching pad for legendary topless dancer Carol Doda, and the Condor’s application included quotes from late great Herb Caen. But Commissioner Ruchira Nageswaran pointed out: “Herb Caen’s quotes in the nomination were described as ‘honouring’ Carol Doda, but they were distinct in objectifying her rather than describing her as a person or for her performance.

“The Condor’s nomination notes that ownership has been solely held by men throughout the company’s history,” Nageswaran added. “And in the article commemorating her, Carol Doda left her long career at the Condor indicating that she had never been paid enough. ‘company.

And Nageswaran added that the club may have been a point in the sexual revolution, but in a way that may not stand the test of time.

“For nominees of all types, it’s important to see an increase in racial and social equity reflected in their nomination,” she said. “The liberation of women ideally provides equal opportunities with other genders based on capabilities and contributions apart from discriminating factors of sexualization.”

Other commissioners have argued that the Condor bid should not be penalized for the sexism that has been common in the past.

“I was raised in Indiana by a mom who sold real estate. And I’ll tell you right now she was treated like crap,” commissioner Chris Foley said. “I don’t think not that it’s our job, just like if someone sold me hot dogs and I only ate vegetarian food, I would have to tell the hot dog maker to make vegetarian hot dogs.”

But there was consensus that the Legacy Business app relied entirely on Doda showing off her boobs in the past and did not reflect any commitment to genuinely advancing women.

“When I saw other legacy companies come forward to us, they had already volunteered to show us how much community outreach and how many things they will do and have already done to really address the social equity component and race,” Commissioner Lydia So said. “But what we lack to see [from the Condor] are you going to do or have you already done that will improve the place of women.

The commission recommended approving the Condor as a legacy business, but with several additional hurdles and a rather tortured additional bureaucratic process that requires some commitment to advancing women rather than just stripping them naked.

They recommended approval, but with a stipulation that Condor consider “developing a framework” to ensure the training and promotion of women, especially those at the heart of the business, and incorporate those recommendations for consideration by the SF Department on the Status of Women and Small Business. Business Commissioner.

Thus, the Condor Club did not get final approval from Legacy Business on Wednesday. Their application now goes to the Small Business Commission, which could also potentially send it to the SF Supervisory Board before final approval.

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South Haven groups hope to preserve historic bridge https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/south-haven-groups-hope-to-preserve-historic-bridge/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 00:08:43 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/south-haven-groups-hope-to-preserve-historic-bridge/ The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is planning a $5 million improvement project for the Kal Haven Trail over the next few years, which has raised concerns about the fate of an iconic bridge near the South Haven Trailhead . The Donald F. Nichols Covered Bridge was once a railroad bridge that was abandoned in […]]]>

The Michigan Department of Natural Resources is planning a $5 million improvement project for the Kal Haven Trail over the next few years, which has raised concerns about the fate of an iconic bridge near the South Haven Trailhead . The Donald F. Nichols Covered Bridge was once a railroad bridge that was abandoned in the 1970s and later incorporated into the Kal Haven Trail. South Haven Visitors Bureau director Jen Sistrunk told WSJM News that the bridge was a popular attraction.

“We regularly have guests in our office looking to hit the trail, and that’s usually their stop right now,” Sistrunk said. “If you check social media, you will see many, many families and photos of people on the covered bridge. It is certainly an icon.

The DNR plans to replace several trail bridges as part of its planned 17-mile repaving project for the Kal Haven Trail. This causes locals to fear that the covered bridge may be lost. Sistrunk says they are willing to work with the DNR.

“We understand that major renovations need to be carried out on the bridge. At this time they are not disclosing exactly what their intentions are, but hopefully we can work with DNR to ensure we find a solution that works for everyone:

Sistrunk says that if there is a fundraising element that might come into play, the Visitors Bureau would be interested in being part of the conversation. The DNR did not say what its design plans are for the Donald F. Nichols Bridge, which can be seen on the cover of the current issue of Pure Michigan Magazine. The DNR told us in July that they plan to start their $5 million project on the trail within the next few years.

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CDA Completes Landmark USDA Grant to Fund Up to $25 Million for Soil Health Projects https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/cda-completes-landmark-usda-grant-to-fund-up-to-25-million-for-soil-health-projects/ Fri, 28 Oct 2022 15:59:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/cda-completes-landmark-usda-grant-to-fund-up-to-25-million-for-soil-health-projects/ BROOMFIELD, Colo. – The Colorado Department of Agriculture has finalized the grant agreement to make a significant investment in Colorado’s STAR soil health program. CDA’s STAR program was one of 70 projects selected for funding by the United States Department of Agriculture under the Partnerships for Climate-Smart Commodities project. This is a historic investment in […]]]>

BROOMFIELD, Colo. – The Colorado Department of Agriculture has finalized the grant agreement to make a significant investment in Colorado’s STAR soil health program. CDA’s STAR program was one of 70 projects selected for funding by the United States Department of Agriculture under the Partnerships for Climate-Smart Commodities project. This is a historic investment in Colorado agriculture that will advance soil and climate solutions led by farmers and ranchers.

CDA will receive $25 million to more than double its participation in the Saving Tomorrow’s Agricultural Resources (STAR) program across Colorado, expand research into the benefits of regenerative agriculture in eight western Intermountain states , scale the model nationwide, and continue to build markets for growers who deploy climate-smart farming practices.

This historic investment for Colorado farmers, ranchers and farming communities means a significant influx of funds to help growers absorb the financial risks of adopting new growing and rangeland practices that improve soil health and climate resilience. This program has always been and will remain entirely voluntary. The funds will expand the STAR Plus program to work with Colorado’s diverse growers, from small farms to large-scale production operations. In addition to expanding the ability to offer financial and technical support to STAR participants, the ambitious Colorado Soil Health Pilot Program will be scaled up nationwide to establish a reliable market signal that will provide producers with new and diversified market opportunities that will reward them for their management.



“This unprecedented funding for Colorado agriculture will allow CDA and its partners to put their full force behind the soil health initiatives we have piloted for the past two years,” said Colorado Agriculture Commissioner Kate Greenberg. “This major USDA investment will allow us to show consumers the progress Colorado farmers and ranchers are making in deploying climate-smart agricultural practices by developing market signals that assure customers of our commitment to fighting climate change. climate change. This funding will show the nation and the world that Colorado agriculture is at the forefront of innovative production and stewardship in a changing world.

Farmers and ranchers experience the impacts of climate change firsthand, and healthy soils are key to mitigating these effects in agricultural landscapes. Improving soil health can increase carbon sequestration, reduce agricultural runoff, decrease erosion, and support more productive, high-yielding crops.



PARTNERSHIP

The USDA and CDA have worked in partnership to advance agricultural solutions to climate change and STAR’s funding is direct evidence of this.

“This funding exemplifies USDA’s commitment to natural resource conservation partnerships,” said Clint Evans, Colorado state ecologist for the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service. “The STAR program leverages federal dollars, with state and local planning and actions to directly benefit soil and other natural resources, as well as climate-smart agricultural efforts.”

STAR was shaped from the ground up by farmers, ranchers, conservation districts and other partners who helped CDA adapt it to work for different crops, ranges and different methods of farming and d farming across the state.

“Our community may be behind on some agricultural metrics, but we are leading in terms of sustainability and all because our traditional practices have been preserved for hundreds of years,” said Costilla County Rancher and Commissioner Steven Romero, a board member of the Sangre de Cristo Acequia Association, a key partner in this grant. “It’s amazing to see a program like this come to fruition. As a company, we are finally putting a dollar amount on sustainability and how people have been practicing for ages.

The STAR program was designed to serve everyone, from the smallest producer to the largest, in all types of production. This commitment to soil health has also been a key priority for a number of commodity groups across Colorado.

“Farmers have been ahead of the curve when it comes to sustainability, as evidenced by the incredible environmental improvements in many areas since 1980. This grant is a great opportunity that will help growers find innovative practices to boost the health of our soils, which is the basis of what we do and strengthen the resilience of our agricultural systems”, said Nick Colglazier, executive director of the Colorado Corn Administrative Committee. “It will continue agriculture’s journey towards sustainability, so consumers can continue to trust that the food, fiber and fuel they buy ensures a sustainable future for all.”

The Saving Tomorrow’s Agriculture Resources program is an innovative and simple framework that allows farmers and ranchers to assess their current production system, identify areas for improvement, document their progress and share their successes. In Colorado, STAR evaluates 11 different cropping and pasture systems for soil health and serves as a complementary tool to the more robust STAR Plus program. STAR Plus is a three-year program that provides financial and technical assistance to growers and is implemented in partnership with local conservation district experts.

“We believe the expansion of this soil health program is an important step in creating a better future for our industry,” said Jim Erlich, executive director of the Colorado Potato Administrative Committee in a letter of support submitted with the CSC grant application. “Recent struggles with a prolonged drought have placed enormous pressure on our underground aquifer. Our growers believe this program can help them continue their adoption of cover crop strategies to save water and soil and to increase material. organic on their farms.

NEW MARKETS

Funding from the grant will also help develop new markets for items produced using regenerative farming practices. CDA will work to develop and implement a strategy to make the STAR rating a market signal for buyers and consumers interested in supporting climate-smart agricultural practices. CDA will also work to connect Colorado STAR participants directly to supply chain partners and integrate STAR into the Colorado Proud program, CDA’s highly successful marketing program that Colorado consumers already associate with high-quality food produced. locally.

The 2022 growing season was the first year of operation for the STAR+ pilot program. There are currently 16 conservation districts, three eligible entities, and 130 farmers and ranchers who are shaping this program with us as we grow. The program is expected to more than double over the next application period which will cover the 2024 growing season.

CDA’s proposal received 60 letters of support, including conservation districts, local and national nonprofit organizations, agricultural commodity groups, and food buyers and processors. CDA will work closely with project partners to increase participation in STAR and conduct research that quantifies soil health benefits. The program will include research sites in Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah and Washington to understand the carbon, water and economic benefits of healthy soil practices. Incentive payments through the STAR will be targeted to historically underserved farmer populations.

List of project partners and their roles:

  • Colorado Natural Resources Conservation Service continues its longstanding conservation partnership with CDA and will administer the CSC agreement locally.
  • Department of Soil and Crop Sciences at Colorado State University quantify and verify climate outcomes across the program and investigate soil health, soil moisture, and carbon impacts of new practices. This will include the use of COMET tools, soil sampling, soil moisture probes, economic analysis and sociological analysis. Contractors include Montana State University, New Mexico State University, Utah State University, University of Idaho, and University of Wyoming.
  • CSU agricultural experimental station and CSU extension will provide technical assistance to producers enrolled in STAR Plus.
  • CSU Department of Sociology will investigate the impacts of varying participation in the STAR program on the adoption of soil health practices.
  • Champaign County Soil & Water Conservation District (Illinois), originator of the STAR program, will create STAR National, establish a uniform market signal for STAR, and support STAR’s expansion into other western states.
  • Conservation Districts and other eligible entities will enroll farmers and support the adoption of climate-smart practices throughout Colorado.
  • National Center for Appropriate Technologies facilitate peer-to-peer learning meetings where farmers and ranchers can share lessons learned and best practices when implementing soil health practices.
  • Colorado Open Lands and the Association Sangre de Cristo d’Acequias facilitate peer-to-peer learning within the Acequia community and enroll STAR Plus participants.

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Mayor’s Office – News – Articles – October 2022 – New Orleans Tourism and Culture Fund Announces Partnership with Library, Program Statistics and Upcomi https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/mayors-office-news-articles-october-2022-new-orleans-tourism-and-culture-fund-announces-partnership-with-library-program-statistics-and-upcomi/ Tue, 25 Oct 2022 22:50:41 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/mayors-office-news-articles-october-2022-new-orleans-tourism-and-culture-fund-announces-partnership-with-library-program-statistics-and-upcomi/ October 25, 2022 | From the city of New Orleans New Orleans Tourism and Culture Fund Announces Library Partnership, Program Statistics and Series of Upcoming Elevations NEW ORLEANS – Mayor LaToya Cantrell, on Wednesday, October 26, will join the New Orleans Tourism and Culture Fund (NOTCF) at the New Orleans Public Library (NOPL) to showcase […]]]>

October 25, 2022 | From the city of New Orleans

New Orleans Tourism and Culture Fund Announces Library Partnership, Program Statistics and Series of Upcoming Elevations

NEW ORLEANS – Mayor LaToya Cantrell, on Wednesday, October 26, will join the New Orleans Tourism and Culture Fund (NOTCF) at the New Orleans Public Library (NOPL) to showcase a newly established partnership with NOPL. Updates on grants awarded to date and details of the next Elevation Series training will be provided to all business owners so they can participate before the end of the year.

NOTCF will partner with NOPL to introduce a newly formed collaboration. Five library locations, including the Main Library, Rosa F. Keller, Alger Regional, East New Orleans Regional and Nora Navra will be sites for interactive signage created to showcase NOTCF programs and resources. With NOPL’s offerings and its connection to the communities they serve, several critical opportunities are expected to arise from this partnership.

“As a public library, it is our duty to serve all residents and visitors with free access to the information and resources they need. We are thrilled to partner with NOTCF to help provide vital resources to carriers of New Orleans culture,” said Emily Painton, NOPL Executive Director and City Librarian.

The NOTCF will also provide quarterly updates on grants awarded, programs launched and partnerships established. Since the NOTCF’s inception, 552 grants totaling more than $5.5 million have been awarded.

“The historic reinvestment in local cultural industries and cultural artists is reaping dividends for our artists and strategically building creative infrastructure through technology – tech culture,” said Lisa D. Alexis, President and CEO of NOTCF.

This quarter, NOTCF reaffirmed its commitment to the economy by sponsoring the Fried Chicken Festival and the NOLA x NOLA music series. Developing new partnerships and cultivating existing ones strengthens the cultural economy of our City. One of NOTCF’s established partnerships with K. Allen Consulting has led to the creation of The Elevation Series, where culture carriers can gain the tools to advance their business through the workshops offered.

On Saturday, October 29, another free in-person workshop, Make your small business more accessible, will be offered to all businesses looking to rise in the new year. Participants will learn how to grow their business and improve the customer experience. This training will take place at the City Park Campus of Delgado Community College (615 City Park Ave.), from 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. in Building 8. Registration is required. Those interested in registering for the workshop can register here.

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