Historic Resources – Hamline Midway History http://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 16:22:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/hamline-midway-history-icon-150x150.jpg Historic Resources – Hamline Midway History http://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/ 32 32 US Senators Alex Padilla and Dianne Feinstein ask for $ 7.7 billion for California wildfire response and recovery efforts https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/us-senators-alex-padilla-and-dianne-feinstein-ask-for-7-7-billion-for-california-wildfire-response-and-recovery-efforts/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 13:04:03 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/us-senators-alex-padilla-and-dianne-feinstein-ask-for-7-7-billion-for-california-wildfire-response-and-recovery-efforts/ 2021 Tamarack Fire, highway. 395, afternoon of July 22Credit: USFS September 19, 2021 – WASHINGTON, DC – On Saturday, U.S. Senators Alex Padilla and Dianne Feinstein (both D-Calif.) Sent a letter to Senate Majority Leader Schumer, Senate Minority Leader McConnell, Senate Appropriations President Leahy and Vice President Shelby urging them to include at least $ […]]]>

2021 Tamarack Fire, highway. 395, afternoon of July 22
Credit: USFS

September 19, 2021 – WASHINGTON, DC – On Saturday, U.S. Senators Alex Padilla and Dianne Feinstein (both D-Calif.) Sent a letter to Senate Majority Leader Schumer, Senate Minority Leader McConnell, Senate Appropriations President Leahy and Vice President Shelby urging them to include at least $ 7.7 billion and targeted tax relief in the Supplemental Disaster Funding program as requested by the State of California to support response and recovery efforts related to the historic and devastating 2021 wildfire season.

“California is using every resource at its disposal to fight these fires, but the explosion in fire activity this season has placed immense pressure on California’s resources, and it is impossible for the state and the local governments to secure the necessary resources to adequately support survivor and recovery efforts. The immense size and scope of this year’s wildfire season requires federal support, ” wrote the senators.

“Therefore, we urge you to include California’s $ 7.7 billion request and targeted tax relief in the upcoming supplemental disaster funding legislation to support recovery efforts related to the historic and devastating season.” of the forest fires of 2021. ” continued the Senators.

A copy of the letter is available here and lower.

Dear Chief Schumer, Chief McConnell, President Leahy and Vice President Shelby:

As you prepare for a supplemental disaster funding program, we urge you to include at least $ 7.7 billion and targeted tax relief as requested by the State of California to support the firefighting efforts of forest and reclamation.

So far this year, the western United States has experienced historically significant fires. In California, more than 2 million acres have burned, and the three largest fires – the Dixie, Caldor and River Fires – alone burned 1.2 million acres. At the height of these fires, more than 15,000 firefighters were deployed and more than 50,000 residents were evacuated in response to the Caldor fire. To date, nearly 3,000 structures have been destroyed, including 1,842 houses.

California is using every resource at its disposal to fight these fires, but the explosion in fire activity this season has placed immense pressure on California’s resources, and it is impossible for state and governments local people to obtain the necessary resources to support survivors and recovery efforts. The immense size and scope of this year’s wildfire season requires federal support.

Therefore, we urge you to include California’s $ 7.7 billion request and targeted tax relief to support recovery efforts related to the historic and devastating season of the United States in the upcoming disaster funding legislation. 2021 forest fires.
Source: Senator Alex Padillla


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List of buildings involved in the slave trade for sale is for members of the community | Local government https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/list-of-buildings-involved-in-the-slave-trade-for-sale-is-for-members-of-the-community-local-government/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 23:45:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/list-of-buildings-involved-in-the-slave-trade-for-sale-is-for-members-of-the-community-local-government/ “It represents something,” she said. In an email to the Historic Resources Committee and City Council following the September 10 meeting, Jane Smith, a member of the former Blue Ribbon Commission on Race, Memorials and Public Spaces, asked the committee to review the suggestions made by the Blue Ribbon Commission in 2016 about Court Square. […]]]>

“It represents something,” she said.

In an email to the Historic Resources Committee and City Council following the September 10 meeting, Jane Smith, a member of the former Blue Ribbon Commission on Race, Memorials and Public Spaces, asked the committee to review the suggestions made by the Blue Ribbon Commission in 2016 about Court Square.

“It is clear that you are all aware of the historical importance of this space, so I hope you also recognize its potential value to our city as a component of a solemn place of commemoration. I hope you will continue to explore the possibilities for the city to acquire this property, either by purchase or by donation, ”she said.

Smith cited the committee meeting on October 19, 2016, where members discussed the future of the Court Square site.

“A historical marker (…) can speak of the tragedy of the sale of human beings far from their loved ones, far from their community,” John Edwin Mason, member of the Blue Ribbon Commission, said at the meeting. “And we have testimonials from former slaves. Who talked about being sold, and talked about being sold in southern Virginia. We have their words. We can do a little history on a historical marker. … but the slave auction deserves some sort of dark and solemn memorial. I’m not an artist, I’m not an architect, I don’t know what it would look like, but it would be something a certain size and something of a certain emotional impact. “


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California Government Enacts Landmark Duplex and Subdivision Legislation | Holland & Knight LLP https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/california-government-enacts-landmark-duplex-and-subdivision-legislation-holland-knight-llp/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 21:39:06 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/california-government-enacts-landmark-duplex-and-subdivision-legislation-holland-knight-llp/ California Governor Gavin Newsom on September 16, 2021 enacted Senate Bill (SB) 9, a landmark law that would allow ministerial approval of certain housing development projects containing up to two residential units (i.e. duplexes) on a single-family zoned plot. The legislation, which was passed by the California legislature on September 1 and takes effect January […]]]>

California Governor Gavin Newsom on September 16, 2021 enacted Senate Bill (SB) 9, a landmark law that would allow ministerial approval of certain housing development projects containing up to two residential units (i.e. duplexes) on a single-family zoned plot. The legislation, which was passed by the California legislature on September 1 and takes effect January 1, 2022, would also allow ministerial approval of certain lot splits to allow landowners to build up to two units on the newly created lots. . Below are a few steps that single-family home owners and developers can take to understand SB 9, its qualification criteria, and its involvement on future projects.

Eligible projects

SB 9 would allow housing development projects containing no more than two housing units on a single-family zoned plot to be authorized on a ministerial basis, subject to meeting a number of eligibility criteria, including The following :

  • The project site is in a city or an urbanized part of an unincorporated county.
  • The project site is not a) in a coastal area, b) prime agricultural land or statewide significant agricultural land, c) wetlands, d) in an area of very high fire severity, e) a hazardous waste or hazardous list site, f) in a demarcated seismic fault zone, g) in a 100-year flood zone, h) in a bypass channel, i) identified for the conservation in an adopted natural community conservation plan, j) habitat for protected species or k) land subject to conservation easement.
  • The project site may also not require the demolition or alteration of a dwelling if 1) the dwelling is restricted affordable accommodation, 2) subject to rent control, or 3) contains dwellings occupied by tenants in the over the past three years.
  • The project site cannot be taken off the rental market (i.e. under the Ellis Act) for the past 15 years.
  • The project does not propose the demolition of more than 25 percent of the existing exterior walls unless either 1) the local ordinance permits more demolition, or 2) the site has not been occupied by a tenant in the three last years.
  • The project site is not in a neighborhood or historic property included in the California Historic Resource Inventory or in a site designated or listed as a city or county landmark or historic property or district under a city or county ordinance.
  • A local agency may impose objective standards for zoning, subdivision and design review, provided that these objective standards do not preclude the construction of either of the two units with an area less than 800 square feet.
  • No setback is required for an existing structure or a structure built in the same location and to the same dimensions as an existing structure. In other circumstances, the local agency may require four foot side and back yard setbacks.
  • Parking of no more than one space per unit is authorized, except that no parking is required for projects a) within a half-mile walk of a high-quality public transit corridor or d ” a major transit stop or b) within a block of carpooling.
  • A local agency may refuse such a housing development project if there is a written conclusion that the project would create a specific negative impact on public health and safety or the physical environment that there is no way to. mitigate.
  • The rental of any unit created must be for a period exceeding 30 days.
  • The California Coastal Act still applies, except that no public hearing is required for coastal development permits for subdivisions under this legislation.
  • A local agency may not be required to authorize an Accessory Accommodation (ADU) or Junior ADU (JADU) in addition to the second accommodation if there is a divided lot (described below).
  • A local agency cannot reject accommodation solely on the basis that a project offers adjacent or connected structures as long as the structures meet building code safety standards and are sufficient to allow separate transportation.

If these criteria are met, the local agency must approve the project at ministerial level (ie without discretionary review or hearings). Projects approved by the ministry are not subject to the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA).

Splitting lots

In addition to allowing two units on a single family lot, the proposed legislation would allow eligible splits of lots to be approved by the ministry in accordance with a parcel map, after meeting a number of criteria, including many of the same criteria. for the two units described above. Additional criteria include the following:

  • Each plot must be at least 40 percent of the size of the original plot.
  • Each parcel must be at least 1,200 square feet in area, unless the local agency allows a smaller lot size by ordinance.
  • There cannot be a sequential split of lots on the same parcel, nor a split of lots if the owner of the subdivided parcel (or a person working in concert with that owner) has subdivided an adjacent parcel in accordance with this legislation on the subdivided. splitting lots.
  • No right-of-way assignments or off-site improvements may be required.
  • The plot must be limited to residential use.
  • An affidavit stating that the applicant intends to use one of the units as their primary residence for at least three years from the date of approval is required.
  • The local agency will not require a condition requiring the correction of non-compliant zoning conditions.
  • For each plot created by this legislation, a local agency is not required to authorize more than two housing units on a plot.

A local agency may require, as conditions of approval:

  • Easements for public services and equipment
  • Access to the public right-of-way

In addition to increasing density in single-family areas and splitting lots in single-family areas, SB 9 would increase card life extension from 12 months to 24 months and allow four years of extension. instead of three years for subdivision cards with offsite improvements above eligible costs (Gouv’t Code Sec. 66452.6).

Conclusion and Considerations

The SB 9 is designed to increase the housing stock in single-family residential areas, as it allows not only two dwellings per plot, but also some splits of lots with two dwellings each. SB 9 builds on previous state legislation that has been shown to be effective in speeding up the permitting and construction of ADUs and JADUs. If enacted, SB 9 would offer homeowners another avenue to add up to three additional units on their property with minimal regulatory hurdles.

While the legislation has been hailed for its potential in solving the state’s housing crisis, others predict more limited potential. For example, the Terner Center for Housing Innovation at the University of California conducted a study indicating that due to eligibility requirements, physical capacity and financial feasibility, less than 2% of single-family lots are likely to be be able to use SB 9 for up to a maximum of four units.1

In addition, local jurisdictions that have not agreed to adapt to amended state ADU laws may continue to languish in adopting orders, checklists and internal practices that comply with new legal requirements.

Other practical questions will arise if SB 9 is adopted. One of those areas is how SB 9 will intersect the rights of lenders / mortgagees to existing single family properties. If an existing lot is split into two, the newly created second lot would likely remain encumbered by the existing mortgage (s). Questions have arisen as to whether lenders would consent to a split of a lot which could result in the release of collateral, or whether subordination and non-disruption agreements are required between existing and new lenders / mortgagees, whether they are different with regard to the financing of the construction of units on the newly created second lot. Further questions have arisen as to the extent to which the provisions of SB 9 prevail over the rules governing communities of common interest.

While the extent of SB 9’s potential remains to be seen, one thing is certain: The California legislature is committed to addressing the severe housing crisis in the state, and it is considering law duplexes and splits. of lots as a weapon to do so.

Remarks

1 See “Will allowing duplexes and lot splits on zoned plots for a family create new homes? New Housing Supply Sustainability Assessment Under California Senate Bill 9, “Ben Metcalf, David Garcia, Ian Carlton and Kate Macfarlane, Terner Center, July 2021. The low projection of single-family lots using SB 9 was before subsequent changes to SB 9 were made, among other things, to add occupancy from the owner and a three-year certificate.


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Historic power station on Sacramento River converted to new SMUD science and curiosity museum https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/historic-power-station-on-sacramento-river-converted-to-new-smud-science-and-curiosity-museum/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 07:39:55 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/historic-power-station-on-sacramento-river-converted-to-new-smud-science-and-curiosity-museum/ Tweeter Built in 1912, the Pacific Gas and Electric Powerhouse, also known as Sacramento River Station B, sits on the banks of the Sacramento River just north of downtown Sacramento. It was designed in the neoclassical style with Beaux-Arts elements by prominent San Francisco architect Willis Polk. The building is listed on the National Register […]]]>

Built in 1912, the Pacific Gas and Electric Powerhouse, also known as Sacramento River Station B, sits on the banks of the Sacramento River just north of downtown Sacramento. It was designed in the neoclassical style with Beaux-Arts elements by prominent San Francisco architect Willis Polk. The building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, the California Register of Historic Resources, and the Sacramento Register of Historic and Cultural Resources. Originally an auxiliary power station, it was modernized a decade later to become what was then the largest steam turbine power plant in Northern California, and it generated electricity for the region for another 30 years before being decommissioned in 1954.

The building then remained vacant, gradually deteriorating over the next 50 years, making the conversion of the structure the cornerstone of the new Sacramento Municipal District Science and Curiosity Museum a serious undertaking. The $ 52 million facility, slated to open in fall 2021, is expected to be the region’s premier informal science education institution, with hands-on interactive exhibits that will explore the wonders of science, technology , engineering, art and mathematics.

Before demolition could begin in 2018, massive concrete footings were placed around the building to support a temporary $ 2.5 million steel bracing system along the exterior of the building.

Otto Construction began working with the public-private partnership that will operate the new museum in 2008 as part of a collaborative design-build effort with Dreyfuss + Blackford Architecture, Buehler Engineering and the City of Sacramento, which owns the property. . It was the subject of numerous design iterations and value engineering exercises over the next decade, and of course the project required lengthy review and approvals from many federal agencies, state and local. Environmental challenges included the relocation of an elderberry bush which is the habitat of an endangered species of beetle, as well as other habitat issues regarding bats and Swainson’s hawks.

The inspection revealed several structural deficiencies that put the historic building in danger of collapsing. The roof was leaking and there were concerns about the strength of the concrete and possible corrosion of the rebar inside the walls. Eventually the team decided to remove the concrete roof and the east wall due to their low compressive strength. Otto also removed all the concrete on the existing steel structure so that the support system could be evaluated. It turned out that only a few columns in the old boiler room required partial replacement.

The $ 52 million facility, slated to open in fall 2021, is expected to be the region’s premier informal science education institution, with hands-on interactive exhibits that will explore the wonders of science, technology , engineering, art and mathematics.

Before demolition could begin in 2018, massive concrete footings were placed around the building to support a temporary $ 2.5 million steel bracing system along the exterior of the building, including the installation took about three months.

Perhaps the most difficult part of the project was the demolition of the roof. The roof was not safe to walk on, so the demolition had to be done with a Brokk remote control demolition robot which was purchased specifically for this project. It was the only machine of its kind west of the Mississippi. The Brokk was hoisted above the roof by a crane and controlled by two workers in an elevator raised to roof level.

In addition to the new roof, a second story for exhibition spaces was added inside the powerhouse, and the historic steel windows were replicated with additional structural support to meet current code load requirements. wind turbine and energy efficiency.

One thing about the old building that a lot of people don’t realize: when the power plant was built, the river was the highway, so the building was built with its main entrance facing the river. Ships or barges pumped bunker oil into tanks on the south side of the building that powered boilers and produced steam to move turbines and generate electricity.

In front of the historic west window there was a large cartouche statuary which could not be restored due to the poor condition of the concrete.

In front of the historic west window there was a large cartouche statuary which could not be restored due to the poor condition of the concrete. Otto digitally scanned the artifact before it was removed so that a new glass-fiber reinforced concrete statuary could be reproduced. Stephanie Taylor, a local artist, sculpted the two human figures from moss so that a mold could be created and installed on the original location. The monumental main doors were also replicated by Burnett & Sons, a local sawmill and lumber company, and coated with aluminum siding by Capital Sheet Metal.

Otto digitally scanned the artifact before it was removed so that a new glass-fiber reinforced concrete statuary could be reproduced.

The 22,800 square foot extension that houses the state-of-the-art planetarium, classrooms, offices, and a cafe presented its own set of unique requirements. Due to the sandy soil on the shore, Otto had to drill over 90 displacement piles 85 feet deep, with level beams and pile caps connecting them all together. Otto also poured and hardened 24 tilting wall panels on site, the largest of which weighed 54 tonnes. Each panel was lifted by a crane and put in place and all panels were installed in just two and a half days.

The steel ring that serves as the base of the planetarium had to be positioned exactly at an inclination of 5 degrees and a rotation of 5 degrees. The exterior dome consists of structural steel, double-layered metal stud walls, one layer of decking and two layers of plywood covered with zinc panels. The inner dome has been insulated and features two layers of dens and an acoustic spray for sound.

This project has been a big undertaking, revitalizing a historic monument that will have a positive impact on Sacramento and visitors from other communities. Children will have the unique opportunity to learn more about science, technology, engineering, art and math, which can motivate many to embark on a future career in STEAM.

Allison Otto is President and CEO of Otto Construction and is the third generation in the family to lead the business, overseeing the strategic direction of the business, including client outreach and negotiation, identification and acquiring new clients, maintaining relationships with current and past clients, and overseeing projects from an executive perspective.

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Making history work for the world – UofSC News & Events https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/making-history-work-for-the-world-uofsc-news-events/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 20:58:46 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/making-history-work-for-the-world-uofsc-news-events/ Dig deeper and deeper Katie Hatton helps broaden our understanding of Martin Van Buren’s presidency as associate editor of his papers at Cumberland University. Finding these untold stories to add perspective is a big part of the work 2019 graduate Katie Hatton does as Martin Van Buren’s associate editor at Cumberland University in Tennessee. “What […]]]>

Dig deeper and deeper

Katie Hatton helps broaden our understanding of Martin Van Buren’s presidency as associate editor of his papers at Cumberland University.

Finding these untold stories to add perspective is a big part of the work 2019 graduate Katie Hatton does as Martin Van Buren’s associate editor at Cumberland University in Tennessee.

“What I learned from the public history program was to incorporate these diverse perspectives in a way that helps us look more holistically at historical events,” Hatton said, adding that his work as an intern on the university’s Pinckney Papers project with a former co-director of the public history program Connie Schultz led to her work on the Van Buren papers.

“This is where I really learned about the opportunities in public history, not just in museums, but also in what we call document editing – the editing and compilation of documentary papers. a historical figure, which I am doing now with the Van Buren project. ”

Hatton says that while Van Buren’s articles have been curated for some time, part of what she’s working on is expanding the story of her presidency to include the experiences of ordinary Americans during that time.

“Sixty years ago, when they were working on our project, it was in particular Martin Van Buren. And today it’s still about Martin Van Buren, but also the citizens who elect him, citizens who care about him and his policies and how he tries to help them. These are the stories of women in his life and in the New York City area who are affected by his policies and try to influence change. It’s about Native Americans and the Trail of Tears and what their lives would tell you about America at that time. ”

Telling these untold stories and preserving historically important spaces that have been overlooked require research expertise and money.

Megan Brown sits at a table with a man as they sign documents while others watch

Megan Brown, right, signs documents for the historic preservation of the U.S. Virgin Islands.

That’s where Megan Brown, a 1999 public history graduate, who heads the State, Tribal, Local, Plans and Grants division of the National Park Service comes in.

“Megan basically holds the purse strings for a lot of National Park Service grant initiatives,” Weyeneth said of her alumnus. “She holds an extremely important position within the National Park Service.”

Brown’s division administers several grant programs through the Historic Preservation Fund that provide money to local governments for the preservation of historic places and history. Brown’s team also contributes development and provides technical assistance to more than 2,200 organizations doing preservation work.

“It really is an interesting place where federal, state, local and tribal entities all work together on similar goals,” she says. “So it’s a bit unique. ”

Many of these grant programs focus on the preservation of African American heritage sites, including historically black colleges and universities and sites important to the civil rights movement.

“We’ve been getting a lot of money for civil rights lately, and this is a time in history where, for someone my age, we didn’t talk much about it in school,” says Brown. “So it’s tricky. Part of what we help is knowing about these events and how to work with underrepresented communities. ”

Brown says a highlight for her was meeting Leona Tate, one of the women who entered the New Orleans school system at age 6 in 1960.

“Preservation has changed a lot,” says Brown. “We’re not saving the big white man’s house now. We are definitely expanding. And that’s one of the most exciting things we get to do, especially with recent history. There are just these amazing stories that we haven’t really told yet.

“I hope the work we do tells the stories and saves these places.”


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A multi-agency resource center is taking place today in Manville to help families affected by Ida https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/a-multi-agency-resource-center-is-taking-place-today-in-manville-to-help-families-affected-by-ida/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 09:41:36 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/a-multi-agency-resource-center-is-taking-place-today-in-manville-to-help-families-affected-by-ida/ News 12 Staff Sep 16, 2021, 9:40 a.m. Updated: Sep 16, 2021, 9:40 a.m. It’s been two weeks since Ida hit New Jersey, and there are still many families without shelter or even clean water. Among the hardest-hit communities were Manville. Hundreds of residents are still cleaning up and recovering from the historic flooding that […]]]>
It’s been two weeks since Ida hit New Jersey, and there are still many families without shelter or even clean water. Among the hardest-hit communities were Manville.

Hundreds of residents are still cleaning up and recovering from the historic flooding that swept through the area. Ten inches of rain fell.

A multi-agency resource center will be set up today at the 10th Avenue South public library from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Agencies will include FEMA and the Red Cross. Similar resource centers had been set up in various cities across the state this week, such as Lodi, Rahway and Lambertville.

FEMA representatives remind residents to apply for federal funding. They need to know their Social Security number, their bank and routing account number, their annual income, and the damaged residence must be the house you live in for at least six months of the year.

So far, more than 2,200 FEMA disaster assistance requests have been approved in New Jersey for residents affected by Ida, totaling more than $ 9 million.

The Somerset County engineer says people can expect the soggy debris outside their homes to eventually be picked up. He doesn’t know when yet.


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#MoreHistory 2021 – Gettysburg Connection https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/morehistory-2021-gettysburg-connection/ Sat, 11 Sep 2021 21:28:14 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/morehistory-2021-gettysburg-connection/ Park visitors gather around Warfield House Gettysburg National Military Park is pleased to partner with the Civil War Era Diary and Gettysburg College on a series of special events to be held in the park on Saturday, September 18. From 12 p.m. to 2 p.m., join Rangers, Historians, and National Park Service volunteers at select […]]]>
Park visitors gather around Warfield House

Gettysburg National Military Park is pleased to partner with the Civil War Era Diary and Gettysburg College on a series of special events to be held in the park on Saturday, September 18. From 12 p.m. to 2 p.m., join Rangers, Historians, and National Park Service volunteers at select battlefield sites for a special look at some of the forgotten or neglected layers of history in Gettysburg, including the experiences of the black citizens of Gettysburg, the development of the battlefield as a memorial park, and the complicated and controversial history of many of its monuments and memorials.

“We are delighted to be able to work alongside the Journal of the Civil War Era and our partners at Gettysburg College to continue critical conversations about history and memory on the Gettysburg battlefield,” said Superintendent Steve Sims . “This is a great opportunity to expand on the stories we tell and to highlight the work underway at Gettysburg. “

#MoreHistory is a national effort sponsored by the Journal of the Civil War Era to connect academic and public historians in the important work of engaging the public in critical conversations about historic sites. Held in the run-up to the anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s preliminary emancipation proclamation, #MoreHistory 2021 aims to transform historic places like Gettysburg into open-air classrooms where educators and visitors can explore the past together . “#MoreHistory aims to connect history educators across institutional boundaries, to illuminate aspects of Civil War era history that are often overlooked or misunderstood,” said Gregory P. Downs and Kate Masur, editor-in-chief of the review. Additional information on #MoreHistory is available at: www.journalofthecivilwarera.org.

September 18, 2021 calendar

History, monuments and memory: Auto Tour Stop 6, Pitzer Woods
Interpretation station open from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m.

Stop and chat with National Park Service rangers and historians. How did Gettysburg become a national park? When were the Gettysburg monuments placed and how did they shape the memory of the Battle of Gettysburg, the Civil War, and the issues that precipitated the war? Park along West Confederate Avenue. Do not park on Millerstown Road. Keep all wheels on the road.

James Warfield House
Open to the public from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m.

Occupied at the time of battle by members of the African-American community of Gettysburg, the historic James Warfield home was recently rehabilitated by staff from Gettysburg National Military Park. Step inside this modest home and learn about the often forgotten history of Gettysburg’s black citizens and the challenges they faced in the summer of 1863. Park along West Confederate Avenue. Do not park on Millerstown Road. Keep all wheels on the road.

Abraham Brian Farm
Open to the public from 12 p.m. to 2 p.m.

Visitors can explore the home of Abraham Brian and his family. A member of the African-American community of Gettysburg, he fled Gettysburg with his family to return and find his house in ruins. Park in the National Cemetery parking lot or on Hancock Avenue. Keep all wheels on the road.

#MoreHistory Campfire Night Discussion with Dr Hilary N. Green

This special campfire program is co-sponsored by Gettysburg National Military Park, Gettysburg College, and the Journal of the Civil War Era. Held at 7 p.m. at the Park Amphitheater on West Confederate Avenue. This program is free and open to the public.

Remembering Gettysburg: Joseph Winters, Songs and Memory of the Civil War

Focusing on a songwriter from Black Chambersburg, this talk explores how Joseph Winters contributed to the African-American memory of the Gettysburg countryside through songwriting. Documenting the African-American experience during the Gettysburg campaign, Green will show how Winters continued to rely on this local memory for USCT recruiting and securing the vote for black men in the 1880 presidential campaign. .Dr. Hilary N. Green is Associate Professor in the Department of Gender and Race Studies at the University of Alabama. She received her MA in History from Tufts University and her PhD. in History from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is the author of Educational Reconstruction: African American Schools in the Urban South, 1865-1890 (Fordham University Press, 2016) as well as articles, book chapters and other scholarly publications. In addition to several short publications, she is currently working on a second book manuscript examining how everyday African Americans remembered and commemorated the Civil War. She is also working on a National Park Service & Organization of American Historians historical resource study of African-American schools in the South, 1865-1900 and co-edits a volume exploring the Civil War era and the summer of 2020. with Andrew L. Slap.

All events are free and open to the public. All programs will be conducted in accordance with CDC recommendations. People who are not fully vaccinated should continue to wear masks indoors and in crowded outdoor spaces. Masks are mandatory for everyone on all public transport. Further details are available at www.nps.gov/coronavirus.

Gettysburg College is a residential undergraduate liberal arts and science college that prepares students from across the country and around the world to lead lives of personal and professional growth and to tackle the complex issues of our time through effective leadership and socially responsible citizenship.

The Journal of the Civil War Era is published by UNC Press in association with the George and Ann Richards Civil War Era Center. It publishes the most creative new works on the many issues raised by slavery, sectoral crisis, war, emancipation, Reconstruction and the memory of the country’s signal conflict, while bringing a new understanding of the struggles that have defined the period, and by extension, the course of American history in the 19th century.

Gettysburg National Military Park is a unit of the National Park Service that preserves and protects the resources associated with the Battle of Gettysburg and Gettysburg National Cemetery and provides an understanding of the events that took place there within the context of history. American. For a complete list of all free summer ranger programs, please visit our website at www.nps.gov/gett for more information.


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Comment: Honor and Protect the Gateway to Historic Ashley River | Remark https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/comment-honor-and-protect-the-gateway-to-historic-ashley-river-remark/ Sat, 04 Sep 2021 19:00:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/comment-honor-and-protect-the-gateway-to-historic-ashley-river-remark/ The Ashley River Historic District is one of the most significant landscapes in the state of South Carolina. Spanning over 23,000 acres in Charleston and Dorchester counties, 13,000 of which have been permanently protected by private landowners, the district represents a layered cultural and ecological heritage from its colonial beginnings to the 17th century until […]]]>

The Ashley River Historic District is one of the most significant landscapes in the state of South Carolina. Spanning over 23,000 acres in Charleston and Dorchester counties, 13,000 of which have been permanently protected by private landowners, the district represents a layered cultural and ecological heritage from its colonial beginnings to the 17th century until the middle of the 20th century.

Few places in the state offer such a comprehensive opportunity to understand the breadth and complexity of South Carolina’s history and evolution.

Conservation and preservation organizations have worked with the citizens of the Lowcountry for over 50 years to protect this irreplaceable landscape. The Ashley River Historic District was twice included on the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s list of most endangered historic places in the United States, first in 1995 and again in 2018.

Today, as our region continues to experience one of the fastest growing areas in the country, the threat to the Ashley River Historic District and the Ashley River as a whole is perhaps more serious than ever.

One of the most pressing issues is the responsible development of Cooks Crossroads, located in Dorchester County at the corner of Bacons Bridge Road and Ashley River Road. Cooks Crossroads is the northern gateway to the historic Ashley River district.

In 2007, Dorchester County became a government leader in efforts to protect the district by zoning to promote responsible development and mitigate the impacts of construction throughout the corridor.

In 2018, the county again demonstrated great leadership in working with citizens to commission and adopt a set of award-winning development guidelines for Cooks Crossroads. The guidelines established a vision for the Gateway as a gathering place where residents and tourists could come together to experience Lowcountry culture and see what the Ashley River Historic District has to offer.

The guidelines authorize many commercial uses, including restaurants, retail stores, and hospitality centers. However, the guidelines do not allow gas stations because these establishments do not fit into the overall vision of the area as a place of assembly, and they could create serious environmental problems, including pollution from the air. stormwater runoff and fuel spills, in an environmentally sensitive and culturally significant area.

Dorchester County is considering an amendment to these guidelines that would allow the construction of a gas station at Cooks Crossroads. It is very worrying. A gas station there would not inspire the community, promote ecotourism, or help interpret the historical significance of the area. On the contrary, it would encourage further road development in the region and increase the risk of pollution of the river itself from stormwater runoff and potential fuel spills.

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The Lowcountry cannot afford to risk one of its most precious natural, cultural and historical resources. As in the past, the Ashley River – and in particular the Historic District – promotes the culture, economy and quality of life here in the Lowcountry.

The river provides refuge for a variety of iconic wildlife, including deer, endangered birds like the swallowtail kite and wood stork, the red drum and even the endangered Atlantic sturgeon. , which goes upstream to spawn.

Historic sites like Middleton Place and Drayton Hall, both national historic monuments, as well as Magnolia Plantation, draw thousands of visitors each year and help preserve and interpret the history of the Lowcountry. The Ashley River Blue Trail and parks like Rosebrock Park, Colonial Dorchester State Park and the future Ashley River Park offer paddlers, anglers and families the opportunity to spend time together outdoors.

These individual components are shared among multiple government jurisdictions, but they are all connected by a scenic drive believed to be the state’s oldest continuously operating highway, a meandering river, and a shared past. It is imperative that all of these jurisdictions – along with other stakeholders, including residents, nonprofits and businesses – work together to preserve this shared regional asset.

The Ashley River connects us, from its marshy origins in Berkeley County to the Port of Charleston. But its future remains uncertain as urban development encroaches on its sources and changes the historic landscape along its banks. The Lowcountry must work together, now and in the future, to preserve this national treasure.

Dorchester County has a unique opportunity to create something big at Cooks Crossroads by following the visionary guidelines it adopted in 2018 and establishing a gateway to the historic district.

The county also has another opportunity to come forward as a regional leader and declare that the Ashley River deserves to be saved.

We hope that once again he will measure up.

Jason crowley is Senior Director of the Communities and Transportation Program at the Coastal Conservation League. Winslow Hastie is President and CEO of the Historic Charleston Foundation. Also contributed to this editorial Nate berry, senior vice president of the Open Space Institute; Ashley Demosthenes, President and CEO of the Lowcountry Land Trust; Carter Hudgins, President and CEO of Drayton Hall Preservation Trust; Katherine Malone-France, Preservation Officer of the National Trust for Historic Preservation; Tracey Todd, President and CEO of the Middleton Place Foundation; and Brian Turner, director of advocacy with the Preservation Society of Charleston.


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IMPD presents 2022 budget proposal with historic amount of funding for the department – Fox 59 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/impd-presents-2022-budget-proposal-with-historic-amount-of-funding-for-the-department-fox-59/ Thu, 02 Sep 2021 09:08:50 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/impd-presents-2022-budget-proposal-with-historic-amount-of-funding-for-the-department-fox-59/ COVID patient overflow leading to area hospitals pushing some ambulance races FOX59 News / 6 hours ago Video Daily 3 Daily 4 Evening Draw: September 01, 2021 FOX59 News / 6 hours ago Video IMPD presents a 2022 budget proposal with a historical amount of funding for the department FOX59 News / 6 hours ago […]]]>

COVID patient overflow leading to area hospitals pushing some ambulance races

FOX59 News /

Daily 3 Daily 4 Evening Draw: September 01, 2021

FOX59 News /

IMPD presents a 2022 budget proposal with a historical amount of funding for the department

FOX59 News /

Fortville honors fallen heroes with commemorative flag; “It’s everyone’s flag and it represents the best in the world”

FOX59 News /

Indiana Task Force 1 assists with Hurricane Ida in Louisiana

FOX59 News /

Plainfield Police are testing automated license plate readers to help solve and reduce crime

FOX59 News /

Charities prepare to help Afghan refugees arriving in Indiana

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Governor Holcomb’s new decree on school quarantines

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CDC advises against traveling over Labor Day weekend as cases continue to rise

FOX59 News /

Social security in the face of exhaustion

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“Such a Blessing”: Old Bethel Food Pantry Renovation Gives Families Access to Healthy, Nutritious Food

FOX59 News /

Texas: 6-week abortion ban in effect

FOX59 News /


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Hurricane Ida could be a storm of historic proportion, officials say https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/hurricane-ida-could-be-a-storm-of-historic-proportion-officials-say/ Sun, 29 Aug 2021 06:04:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/hurricane-ida-could-be-a-storm-of-historic-proportion-officials-say/ Hurricane Ida, the rapidly intensifying storm toward Louisiana, could be one of the strongest to hit the state in more than a century, meteorologists and state officials warned on Saturday. . “We can sum up by saying that this will be one of the strongest hurricanes to strike anywhere in Louisiana since at least the […]]]>

Hurricane Ida, the rapidly intensifying storm toward Louisiana, could be one of the strongest to hit the state in more than a century, meteorologists and state officials warned on Saturday. .

“We can sum up by saying that this will be one of the strongest hurricanes to strike anywhere in Louisiana since at least the 1850s,” Gov. John Bel Edwards said at a press conference, warning them. residents that their window to evacuate the area was closing. .

Ida, which passed through the Cayman Islands as a tropical storm and made landfall in Cuba on Friday as a Category 1 hurricane, is causing massive evacuations in Louisiana. Officials said early Sunday that it had become a Category 3 storm, and meteorologists expected it to reach Category 4 by the time it made landfall on Sunday afternoon or evening.

The hurricane could hit Louisiana with maximum sustained winds of 130 miles per hour on Sunday, the 16th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina.

“It is very painful to think of another powerful storm like Hurricane Ida that made landfall on this anniversary,” said Mr. Edwards. “But I also want you to know that we are not the same state as 16 years ago.”

The government has invested billions of dollars in improving the region’s storm protection infrastructure. Ida will present a significant test of this system.

On Saturday, a hurricane warning was in effect from Intracoastal City, Louisiana, at the mouth of the Pearl River, an area that includes New Orleans. Coastal counties or those near the Gulf of Mexico in Mississippi and Alabama have also warned their residents of the likely damage from hurricanes.

Kevin Gilmore, a meteorologist with the New Orleans National Weather Service, said the hurricane would have “fatal impacts.”

“We don’t say ‘possible’ – we say ‘will happen’ because we want people to take it very seriously,” said Mr Gilmore. “I cannot stress enough the importance of this situation.”

Louisiana was also hit by several storms last year, including Hurricanes Laura and Delta.

Storm surge warnings were also issued. The National Hurricane Center said depending on the tides, the surge could reach 15 feet in Morgan City, Louisiana, and reach up to 7 feet in Lake Pontchartrain. A storm surge warning was also issued for coastal areas of eastern Alabama and Florida.

Total precipitation accumulation could reach up to 20 inches in southeast Louisiana, with flash flooding, catastrophic wind damage and a potentially fatal storm surge, the center said.

“Preparations to protect life and property should be hastily completed today in the alert zone along the northern Gulf coast,” the center said.

On Saturday night, Ida had maximum sustained winds of 105 miles per hour, making it a Category 2 hurricane, and further strengthening was expected throughout the day, the National Hurricane Center said.

“The strengthening process is definitely in full swing,” said Dennis Feltgen, communications manager at the National Hurricane Center.

The crucial question, for residents and emergency authorities along the Gulf Coast, is how much stronger it will get before it lands in the United States.

The hurricane center said the storm could get much stronger very quickly, becoming a major hurricane – defined as Category 3 or higher, with maximum sustained winds of at least 111 mph – within 24 hours of landing.

Mr Edwards declared a state of emergency on Thursday and Governor Kay Ivey of Alabama declared a state of emergency for the state’s coastal and western counties on Saturday, saying local officials expected “the possibility of flooding and even tornadoes in parts of Alabama.” In Mississippi, Governor Tate Reeves also Posted a state of emergency on Saturday, allowing the use of state resources for response and recovery.

Research over the past decade found that on average, such rapid intensification of hurricanes is increasing, in part because the oceans, which provide the energy for hurricanes, are warming due to human-made greenhouse gas emissions. But Ida will also strengthen quickly because the Gulf, as usual at the end of the summer, is very hot.

The center of the hurricane defines rapid intensification as an increase of at least 35 mph in sustained winds over 24 hours. During the extremely active 2020 season, Hurricane Laura intensified 45 mph in 24 hours before making landfall in Louisiana as a Category 4 storm in late August.

The National Hurricane Center said Ida was likely to produce heavy rainfall Sunday night through Monday from southeast Louisiana to the Mississippi and Alabama coasts. Tropical storm force winds will arrive along the coast as early as Saturday evening, according to the National Weather Service, before the storm makes landfall Sunday afternoon or evening. After moving inland, the storm could contribute to flooding in Tennessee, where flash floods killed 20 people last weekend.

“Based on Ida’s current track and strength, this storm will test our hurricane protection systems in a way they have never tested before,” Executive Assistant Chip Kline said on Twitter. of the Governor of Louisiana for coastal activities. “It’s times like these that remind us of the importance of continuing to protect southern Louisiana.”



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