Historic Resources – Hamline Midway History http://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 20:07:47 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/hamline-midway-history-icon-150x150.jpg Historic Resources – Hamline Midway History http://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/ 32 32 Cobb Archives Global Plan Update Virtual Meeting https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/cobb-archives-global-plan-update-virtual-meeting/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 20:07:47 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/cobb-archives-global-plan-update-virtual-meeting/ The 2021 Cobb County Future Land Use Map; for a larger version Click here. A virtual meeting to present Five-year update of the Cobb 2040 Global Plan will take place on Monday. The meeting, which was to take place at the Mountain View Regional Library, is limited to online attendance due to county COVID-19 limitations. […]]]>
The 2021 Cobb County Future Land Use Map; for a larger version Click here.

A virtual meeting to present Five-year update of the Cobb 2040 Global Plan will take place on Monday.

The meeting, which was to take place at the Mountain View Regional Library, is limited to online attendance due to county COVID-19 limitations.

The first community meeting was canceled on January 13 due to the current surge of the Omicron variant.

Monday’s event lasts from 6-8 p.m. and will take place via Webex. The registration link is by clicking here. The meeting number is 2300 863 0071 and the password is “plan5”.

Participants can also join by phone at +1-415-655-0003 with an access code of 2300 863 0071.

Every five years, the state requires local governments to update their long-term planning priorities. Cobb last updated in 2017 (you can read it here).

The update covers a wide range of planning topics, including land use, transportation, housing, economic development, community facilities, social services, public health, education, natural resources and historical, public safety, intergovernmental coordination, disaster resilience, military compatibility and location. -manufacturing.

Among the update’s development issues that are causing concern is the proposal to create a unified development code.

The Cobb Community Development Agency has proposed a UDC – which exists in Atlanta, DeKalb County and the City of Roswell – that integrates zoning, planning and land use with design guidelines, landscaping, architecture and others.

The agency said on an information page that the changes are necessary to “streamline these documents into one combined document that would be more easily accessible to the public, designers, and county staff reviewers”.

But some county civic leaders have criticized the UDC, saying it would change the suburban nature of many Cobb communities (see our previous article). One opponent said it amounted to declaring “war” on the suburbs.

The process of updating the 2040 Comprehensive Plan will take several months, with additional public meetings to be scheduled and culminating in a vote by the Cobb Board of Commissioners.

An upcoming meeting is scheduled for the Mountain View Regional Library, with a date to be determined.

There will be an open house at the Cobb Civic Center on April 14.

For more information Click here.

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“History”: LGBTQIA+ working group reflects on new community-specific position https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/history-lgbtqia-working-group-reflects-on-new-community-specific-position/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 05:30:30 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/history-lgbtqia-working-group-reflects-on-new-community-specific-position/ The assignment of a new Membership and Inclusion Coordinator in the Student Affairs Division this month, is the culmination of months of work, according to Tyler Viljaste, the president of the LGBTQIA+ Working Group and chief of staff of the Student Government Board. “This position, this potential hiring of staff, is historic, it’s huge,” said […]]]>

The assignment of a new Membership and Inclusion Coordinator in the Student Affairs Division this month, is the culmination of months of work, according to Tyler Viljaste, the president of the LGBTQIA+ Working Group and chief of staff of the Student Government Board.

“This position, this potential hiring of staff, is historic, it’s huge,” said Viljaste, a senior policy, philosophy and finance official. “And while it’s not our pie-in-the-sky dream, it’s not our big ask that we asked for in the proposal, we knew going into it that we probably had to negotiate.”

The LGBTQ+ working group has published a report last spring, detailing resources currently available to the LGBTQ+ community in Pitt, and recommendations for creating a more inclusive environment. The report included a proposal for an LGBTQ+ center, new staff hires, and recommendations for more student services and counseling.

After the publication of the report, Vilijaste created a petition, which ultimately garnered over 600 signatures, urging the University to begin implementing the task force’s recommendation.

Over the past summer and fall semester, members of the LGBTQIA+ working group, including Viljaste, have worked with representatives from the Office of Student Affairs and the Office of Cross-Cultural Leadership Development create a new position within the Office of Student Affairs. According to Viljaste, as the negotiations progressed, the position evolved into a role of program director, different from the original title of deputy director.

Abolished Kesbhat, vice president of operations for SGB and a member of the task force, said a community-specific position is needed to foster a truly inclusive community.

“LGBTQIA+ students, faculty, and staff have unique needs and there needs to be someone or people who specifically cater to those needs,” said Kesbhat, a neuroscience and psychology major. “It’s not possible for a catch-all post to truly understand and champion the unique needs of our diverse student population, so having community-specific posts is important.”

Kesbhat said that ideally this position would involve building campus-wide initiatives for the LGBTQ+ community.

“There are a lot of people who have made incredible strides towards a campus that is inclusive of LGBTQIA+ students, faculty, and staff,” Kesbhat said. “These individuals are best placed to continue their quest for a more inclusive campus in a more formal and specific role.”

Suz Deemer, immigration specialist at University Center for International Studies and a member of the task force, said that this position would raise a lot of expectations.

“Our task force is hoping that someone is willing to somehow be innovative and build something new,” Deemer said. “Who understands where we are historically in this effort as a university and someone who is able to provide more structured support across campus, so I think it’s going to be a really big job.”

Since the position primarily involves interaction with Pitt students, Laura Nelson, assistant director of the Office of Undergraduate Research, Scholarships and Creative Activity and a member of the task force, said active listening and engaging with Pitt’s LGBTQ+ community is crucial.

“We hope this person will be, if not a member of the LGBTQ community, a really active accomplice in the community,” Nelson said. “Someone who will listen a lot first and learn a lot about the needs of different groups of LGBTQ students.”

According to the job posting, this new hire will be responsible for “attending organization meetings, meeting regularly with student leaders, and assisting with the organization’s programming efforts,” among other duties.

Deemer said this position will help centralize resources and support for the LGBTQ+ community, while creating training programs for students, staff and faculty.

“A lot of the work will be training efforts, like training allies,” Deemer said. “We also hope the post really emphasizes intersectionality and understands that LGBTQ students are also Black students, Asian students, and kind of understands how a lot of these identity intersections will affect this work.”

Nelson said the task force sought to both make recommendations and assess community stakeholder views on Pitt’s current resources.

“It was responding to this feeling that there is a lack of center on campus, which is quite unusual at universities of this caliber,” Nelson said. “But before getting into the proposal to create a center, website and staff position, the task force did a lot of research and discussions with community stakeholders to determine the state of resources at Pitt.”

The Task Force specifically recommended a new role of Executive Director in the Office of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion and an assistant director position in the Office of Student Affairs. According to Viljaste, faculty and staff often provide mentorship and resources on their own time or on a volunteer basis, without contributing to their salary or tenure.

Deemer said relying on unpaid labor was unsustainable and the University needed to change this common practice.

“So we really wanted it [the task force’s proposal] to be something that the University was putting its money where it was, and actually supporting it with a salary post and resources dedicated to that community,” Deemer said.

Looking ahead, Viljaste said he hopes the University will continue to foster an inclusive environment by creating a similar position for OEDI, dedicated to research and substantive policy change, and building external relationships with other LGBTQ+ centers and academic institutions.

Viljaste said that while this is not the specific position the task force originally requested, it remains a marker of progress.

“We are delighted with this position,” Viljaste said. “And the fact that it’s better than, you know, where we were a year ago.”

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Eight Arkansas Properties Added to National Register of Historic Places https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/eight-arkansas-properties-added-to-national-register-of-historic-places/ Wed, 19 Jan 2022 10:27:36 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/eight-arkansas-properties-added-to-national-register-of-historic-places/ Eight Arkansas properties have been added to the National Register of Historic Places. They include two historic areas of Little Rock, the Forrest City Public Library and historic downtown Winslow. The new listings were announced Tuesday by the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program. Lists for Little Rock include the Broadmoor neighborhood and the Arkansas State Fairgrounds […]]]>

Eight Arkansas properties have been added to the National Register of Historic Places.

They include two historic areas of Little Rock, the Forrest City Public Library and historic downtown Winslow.

The new listings were announced Tuesday by the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program.

Lists for Little Rock include the Broadmoor neighborhood and the Arkansas State Fairgrounds Historic Districts.

Broadmoor is a residential development about 4.5 miles west of downtown Little Rock, according to the National Register Nomination Form. It was developed in what was then the southwestern outskirts of the city by local developer Fausett and Company beginning in 1953.

The Broadmoor Neighborhood Historic District boundary encompasses the neighborhood’s three original flats and 554 residential lots, in addition to a park and lake.

When developed in the 1950s, Broadmoor homes were “fitted with the latest modern amenities” to appeal to middle-class homebuyers, according to the nomination.

The Broadmoor area remains “a distinct entity in the landscape”, with 458 of its 559 buildings contributing to the National Register, according to the nomination.

“Non-contributing resources may have material changes, additions, or modifications, such as the carport enclosure, that detract from their original design intent, but overall the residences retain their original scale and form reflecting the original rhythm of the houses along the streets of Broadmoor, even where non-contributory resources exist,” according to the nomination.

The Arkansas State Fairgrounds Historic District includes the Barton Coliseum and its four adjacent cattle barns, all of which were designed by the Little Rock architectural firm of Erhart, Eichenbaum and Rauch and built from the late 1940s to early 1950s, depending on the nomination.

The historic district also includes three modern buildings built nearby.

“The Barton Coliseum and cattle barns are all constructed of buff brick, which gives the buildings a cohesive appearance,” according to the nomination. “Cattle sheds are notable for their monitor roofs and open sides, which provided ventilation for livestock that were on display in the buildings, while the Barton Coliseum is notable for its oval shape and domed roof with monitor.”

Barton Coliseum has become a prominent concert hall in Little Rock. By 2012, the Barton Coliseum had hosted more than 525 major concerts, according to the nomination.

In northwest Arkansas, the Winslow Commercial Historic District has also been listed on the National Register.

The neighborhood includes three buildings on North Winslow Boulevard – Winslow City Hall, Winslow Mercantile, and a building that once housed the Winslow Recreation Hall.

Two of the three commercial buildings [City Hall and the mercantile] share a party wall. These two buildings were damaged by fire in 1935 and rebuilt on the original site around 1938, according to the nomination.

The other building, at 182 N. Winslow Boulevard, was originally constructed sometime before 1929 and served various uses, including as a Winslow recreation hall, before being used today as residential spaces , depending on the appointment.

At the time of the appointment in November, City Hall and commercial buildings had been closed since the previous year. The City Hall building was closed for repairs due to flood damage, according to the appointment. At the beginning of the 20th century, it housed a pharmacy.

While most Winslow businesses are now along US 71, the old downtown area along Winslow Boulevard/Arkansas 74 remains a draw.

Residents gather downtown for the weekly farmer’s market and kaffeeklatsch throughout the year, according to the appointment. Winslow Boulevard is also the site of the Christmas Parade, Mayor’s Proclamations, and Winslow History Day.

“The film ‘Smoke in the Wind,’ starring Walter Brennan in his final role, used the Winslow Mercantile and adjacent downtown buildings as a backdrop to the Civil War in 1971,” according to the nomination.

Other Arkansas properties that were listed on the National Registry were:

• The Forrest City Public Library, which was built by the Public Works Administration and completed in 1939.

• Scott Memorial Methodist Episcopal Church in Eudora, which was built in 1922 (a communion hall was added in 1969).

• First Presbyterian Church in downtown Helena, part of Helena-West Helena, built circa 1925.

• Presbyterian Center in Fayetteville, which was built in 1964 along the north edge of the University of Arkansas campus.

• The North Garvin Drive Historic District in Fayetteville consists of three houses on the west side of the street that were designed by architect Cyrus Sutherland and built between approximately 1961 and 1983.

The National Register of Historic Places is a program of the National Park Service. Listings are honorary, and properties with this distinction may be eligible for state and national grant and tax programs, according to a press release from the Arkansas Historic Preservation Program.

Arkansas properties listed on the National Registry and their nomination forms are available at https://bit.ly/3rsjOPn.

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Calgary revamps the city’s historic site mapping tools https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/calgary-revamps-the-citys-historic-site-mapping-tools/ Mon, 17 Jan 2022 18:36:53 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/calgary-revamps-the-citys-historic-site-mapping-tools/ The City of Calgary and Heritage Calgary have launched their revamped mapping tool. MAP SCREENSHOT The City of Calgary and Heritage Calgary have launched a revised map with tools to access over 800 historic sites. The map of assessed historic sites combined the Discover Historic Calgary map and the Heritage Inventory into a single mapping […]]]>
The City of Calgary and Heritage Calgary have launched their revamped mapping tool. MAP SCREENSHOT

The City of Calgary and Heritage Calgary have launched a revised map with tools to access over 800 historic sites.

The map of assessed historic sites combined the Discover Historic Calgary map and the Heritage Inventory into a single mapping tool.

“With the map enhancements, Calgarians can find and access information about more than 800 rated historic resources in a simpler and more dynamic way,” said Josh White of the City of Calgary.

Some of the site’s improvements include that it’s now mobile-friendly, there are improved search and download capabilities, and you can choose aerial photos from different time periods. They also have color coded historical sites for color blind people.

There are over 800 historic sites included in the collection. Some of the information included is heritage value, defining characteristics, significant dates, and prior ownership.

“We are very excited to add more historical depth to our inventory resource and to add features that improve inventory usage,” said Josh Traptow, CEO, Heritage Calgary.

“Knowing the historical significance of a place, landscape or building adds to the richness of our understanding of Calgary.

This is news to the ears of some users. The site is often used as a reference for historians, writers and journalists.

“These are features I didn’t even know I needed,” said Harry Sanders, historian and freelance writer.

“For me, telling the stories of our past should be rooted in facts and details that help us understand the meaning of a place.”

The project coincided with a lifecycle replacement of information servers in an overhaul of the city’s digital infrastructure.

The Assessed Historic Resources Inventory Map can be found online here.

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Drones: State Clarifies Use of Piloted Craft in Parks and Along Ocean Coasts | News https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/drones-state-clarifies-use-of-piloted-craft-in-parks-and-along-ocean-coasts-news/ Sun, 16 Jan 2022 01:00:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/drones-state-clarifies-use-of-piloted-craft-in-parks-and-along-ocean-coasts-news/ The Oregon Department of Parks and Recreation is launching a review of drone use in state parks and along Oregon beaches. Metro Creative Connection You’ve probably seen small drones fly over St. Helens and Scappose from time to time. The popular crafts are used by businesses and hobbyists and have now come to the attention […]]]>






The Oregon Department of Parks and Recreation is launching a review of drone use in state parks and along Oregon beaches.




You’ve probably seen small drones fly over St. Helens and Scappose from time to time.

The popular crafts are used by businesses and hobbyists and have now come to the attention of the Oregon State Department of Parks and Recreation (ORPD).

The OPRD intends to create rules to provide the clarity necessary for drone pilots, hobbyists, and the general public to know where drone takeoff and landing is permitted and prohibited in a state park and the along the ocean coast.

“While we receive occasional complaints about drones, we also receive inquiries from pilots about where and how they can take off and land in a state park and on the ocean shoreline,” the spokesperson said. from the OPRD, Chris Havel. “So it’s not so much about responding to complaints as it is about managing a legitimate form of recreation so that it doesn’t create conflict or damage resources. Drones are popular, and we want to give our staff field tips on how to manage it and help owners enjoy their hobby by taking a consistent approach from park to park.”

Havel said the state agency does not currently have drone-specific rules.

“We had to get approval from the legislature in 2021 to start the ongoing public rulemaking process — so state park managers have relied on broader rules that protect people, property, and natural and historical resources to manage drones on a case-by-case basis — on a case-by-case basis,” Havel said. “As part of this approach, managers have sometimes prohibited drone takeoffs and landings from a park ‘State to protect a nesting bird or a historic structure such as a lighthouse.’

Although the OPRD has penalties for rule violations, Havel said the agency’s process is generally education first.

“We very rarely jump straight to a quote when someone breaks a rule; we usually inform, then warn, then quote unless it’s an extreme case,” he said. “The fine for violating a park rule and damaging a resource ranges up to approximately $2,000 and/or expulsion from a park depending on the severity of the incident.”

According to Havel, penalties for violation of park rules are set broadly (see https://secure.sos.state.or.us/oard/viewSingleRule.action?ruleVrsnRsn=187975), so violation of rules on drones would be treated the same as other offences.

The OPRD Rules Advisory Committee will meet virtually on January 24 to review and discuss proposed changes to Oregon’s administrative rules regarding drone use.

The committee will also discuss the financial or economic effects of the proposed rules on businesses, local governments or other stakeholders.

The committee meeting begins at 10:30 a.m. and will be streamed live on YouTube for the public at https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCkqL6iVPBrfCTO27cNmCTwg. The meeting agenda does not provide time for public comments.

After committee review, the proposed rules will be open for public comment. Details will be posted on the OPRD Proposed Rules webpage.

The OPRD has appointed members to the Rules Advisory Committee. Members include drone pilots, agency representatives, conservationists, and active visitors to state parks. Additional CCR members were added for this second meeting. The first meeting took place in November 2021.

Individuals requiring special accommodations to view meetings should contact Katie Gauthier at least three days prior to the meeting at 503-510-9678 or katie.gauthier@oregon.gov.

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Several senior Newport RI government officials left in late 2021 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/several-senior-newport-ri-government-officials-left-in-late-2021/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 10:02:46 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/several-senior-newport-ri-government-officials-left-in-late-2021/ NEWPORT — The city’s building official, who was director of the zoning and inspections division, city planner, historic preservation officer and fire chief all left city jobs at the end of 2021, so there has been a lot of turnover at the top of the city government. Building Officer William A. Hanley II retired on […]]]>

NEWPORT — The city’s building official, who was director of the zoning and inspections division, city planner, historic preservation officer and fire chief all left city jobs at the end of 2021, so there has been a lot of turnover at the top of the city government.

Building Officer William A. Hanley II retired on December 31. He had worked in Newport since November 2004.

Ted J. Isabella started as Hanley’s replacement on Monday. Isabella was previously a building inspector in East Providence, where he was licensed as a building official. Before that, he was a building inspector in Providence, according to Michael Coury, the city’s director of human resources.

Following: Newport Fire Chief Brian Dugan is set to retire after decades serving the department

Isabella also worked as a minimum housing inspector in Providence and, before entering the inspections field, had her own construction company, said Tom Shevlin, the city’s communications manager.

Christine O’Grady is back as an urban planner. She replaces Peter Friedrich, who left the post at the end of August 2021 to study law in New York. Friedrich had replaced O’Grady, who left the post in December 2018.

O’Grady first took the job as Newport’s city planner in July 2015, but left after 3½ years to become director of planning in Dartmouth, Massachusetts. When asked what motivated her to return, she replied, “I love Newport.”

Historic preservation planner Helen Johnson left her post in December after more than six years on the job to take up a position in the private sector, but continues to help the city through the transition, Coury said. She will be replaced by Nick Armour, who will assume the role in mid-February, Coury said. Armor comes to Newport from Berkeley, Calif., where he is the lead planner.

Chief Brian Dugan, who served in the fire department for decades, retired Dec. 31.

“We will definitely make the announcement soon of a new fire chief,” Coury said.

Following: Do you know these 10 facts and figures about Newport’s North End?

“They’re all great people,” City Manager Joseph J. Nicholson Jr. said. “I’m heartbroken to see them go.” They were all fabulous. Welcome back, Christine O’Grady. She was fantastic when she was here. She was the main driving force and agitator that brought us to the overall land use plan. »

The plan was approved by the state in 2017 and is valid for 10 years.

Some things haven’t changed much for O’Grady. Shortly before he left, there was a line in a Nov. 30, 2018, Newport Daily News article that read, “Grady worked on it.”

These dormitories are still pending before a city council. The Zoning Board of Review is currently holding hearings on whether to approve a special use permit for each of the dorms. The next hearing is scheduled for the end of March 2022.

Following: Want to serve your community? Here are the vacancies on Newport County Council and Committees

“Helen Johnson was very strong and excellent in her position as a historic planner,” Nicholson said. “We wish her good luck – she is still in contact with us and helps us a bit.”

“Bill Hanley still works for us on a volunteer basis,” he added. “We will of course call on him to help us move forward.”

One of the major projects Hanley worked on was getting Newport into the National Flood Insurance Program Community Rating System. As of October 2017, more than 1,400 city homeowners who purchased flood insurance through the program received ongoing discounts on their insurance premiums.

“When we started recruiting for a building official, I was amazed at how many communities in Rhode Island were looking for building officials,” Coury said.

He determined through the Rhode Island League of Cities and Towns that “five or six communities” were looking for a building official, a few of which had been looking for up to two years.

Following: Lights, camera, action: watch these films shot in Newport, Rhode Island

“The fact that Newport was able to attract and place someone in three weeks is incredible,” Coury said. “We were very lucky to have Ted join our team.”

There has also been a lot of turnover in other positions in the city, he said.

“When you see in the news the ‘Great American Resignation,’ I can’t say how true that is,” he said. “COVID has done a lot of things for people, including getting people to change their minds about what they want to do. Maybe it’s trying to do other things. We see it in our own city ​​family.

“I’ve been in this business for 37 years and I’ve never seen what we’re seeing right now, in terms of onboarding, hiring, recruiting,” he said. “Typical salaries are generally competitive, but it’s the pensions, benefits and job security that make people readily accept our offers. This has not necessarily been so over the past year. What we find is that the current employers of our candidates oppose our offers.

“I’ve had more offers turned down in the past year than I’ve ever seen in my 32 years with the city,” Coury said. “We have to be a bit more creative. Luckily, we’re a big city — people recognize Newport. We have our treasures, which makes these integrations a bit easier, but it’s still quite a challenge.

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couple who met at Oregon hot springs to invest $ 100,000 | Wild montana https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/couple-who-met-at-oregon-hot-springs-to-invest-100000-wild-montana/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 13:00:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/couple-who-met-at-oregon-hot-springs-to-invest-100000-wild-montana/ Steam rises from an old building in Bagby Hot Springs in Oregon. Brett French Journal of statesman ZACH URNESS Mike and Tamarah Rysavy met at Bagby Hot Springs in 2001. Two decades later, the husband and wife duo were selected as new operators of the iconic springs nestled in the Mount Hood National Forest between […]]]>





Steam rises from an old building in Bagby Hot Springs in Oregon.


Brett French



Journal of statesman ZACH URNESS

Mike and Tamarah Rysavy met at Bagby Hot Springs in 2001. Two decades later, the husband and wife duo were selected as new operators of the iconic springs nestled in the Mount Hood National Forest between Estacada and Detroit, Oregon.

the Rysavy were chosen from a pool of applicants to manage the unique springs, bathhouses and bathtubs that have fallen into disuse in recent years.

Bagby has been closed since 2020 due to damage from forest fires in the surrounding area and one of the main public baths was condemned and closed in 2018 due to “extensive rot” in its soils.

The Rysavys, who will resume operations in 2023, plan to invest $ 100,000 up front to rehabilitate buildings and make improvements. They also plan to have staff on site around the clock to curb crime and parties, which has been a problem at the site for years.

They will keep the $ 5 per person soaking fee in place.

“We look forward to making Bagby Hot Springs a safe, family-friendly environment for the public,” said Mike Rysavy, who started dating Bagby as a teenager and helped maintain the original buildings in the 1990s. “My wife and I formed Bagby Preservation out of our love for Bagby Hot Springs.


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The Alhambra passed the latest ordinance aimed at mitigating the effects of the housing law SB 9 – Pasadena Star News https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/the-alhambra-passed-the-latest-ordinance-aimed-at-mitigating-the-effects-of-the-housing-law-sb-9-pasadena-star-news/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 00:25:24 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/the-alhambra-passed-the-latest-ordinance-aimed-at-mitigating-the-effects-of-the-housing-law-sb-9-pasadena-star-news/ Senate Bill 9, a state law that came into effect on January 1 and allows for the development of up to four residential units on single-family lots, has prompted cities to enact ordinances to mitigate its effects on current local standards. The city of Alhambra was the last city in the San Gabriel Valley to […]]]>

Senate Bill 9, a state law that came into effect on January 1 and allows for the development of up to four residential units on single-family lots, has prompted cities to enact ordinances to mitigate its effects on current local standards.

The city of Alhambra was the last city in the San Gabriel Valley to pass a temporary ordinance in this regard, voting 5-0 at a special city council meeting this week.

SB 9 is intended to help ease the affordable housing crisis in the state, but has met resistance from cities fearing it will render single-family zoning obsolete.

SB 9 was one of 31 bills signed by Governor Gavin Newsom in the fall.

The Alhambra ordinance went into effect immediately and will last 45 days, giving the city council and town planning commission time to develop a more permanent one.

“The intention here, and the goal here, is simply to protect our residential neighborhoods,” said Councilor Ross Maza. “I think most of us have received feedback from our constituents, from our concerned residents, as we know that many projects that would have been built under SB 9 could permanently damage these residential areas.”

Several comments sent by email were read in the minutes during Tuesday’s meeting. Bernice Ortega wrote about a section of the ordinance which explains how “the proposed urban dwelling must not contain more than two units”, with ADUs and JADUs counted in this maximum number.

She added that the number of conversions per block should be limited to three.

“Unfortunately, with the conversions, units will lose back yards and front yards, leaving children without an outdoor play area,” Ortega wrote. “Regular access to green outdoor spaces has a positive impact on people’s lives, whether it is a bench for thinking or a place where children can play ball.”

She said a pocket park or small lot should be required if more than four single-family homes are converted on a block.

The temporary ordinance has a long list of items. Among them are:

– Any proposed urban lot split must be located within zone R-1 (single-family residential).

– A proposed urban lot division cannot be located in a neighborhood or historic property included in the state’s historic resource inventory or in a site designated or listed as a city or country landmark or a property or historic district under a city or county ordinance.

– In cases where an addition or a new construction is proposed, the owner must not remove any mature tree on the site.

– The rental of any urban accommodation must be for a period of more than 30 days.

– Each unit, including existing units, must provide a minimum of 200 square feet of private open space.

– Urban housing must be permanently maintained as “affordable” housing for a period of at least 30 years from the date of first occupancy. Urban dwellings should be occupied by low or very low income households.

There is much more.

Deputy Mayor Jeff Maloney spoke on Thursday about city council’s intention with the ordinance.

“Obviously, we weren’t looking to do anything that would violate state law; it is not in our interest, ”he said. “From what I understand, some issues were incorporated into SB 9 that identified areas that gave cities flexibility, there were also other areas that were not addressed by SB9. So those are some of the things that we looked at.

“Obviously you see some of those things that are important to us like affordable housing and tree canopy and making sure we have consistent design standards. We would do this for any kind of new development. We just wanted to make sure it was covered for all SB 9 projects. ”

Maloney said this is an evolving topic, “and I’m sure there will be further advice from the state. But I do know that cities across the state are actually looking at different ways to ensure that this meets the needs of their own communities and that was our intention here.


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Madison Village succeeds in attracting new businesses – News-Herald https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/madison-village-succeeds-in-attracting-new-businesses-news-herald/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 18:04:37 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/madison-village-succeeds-in-attracting-new-businesses-news-herald/ EDITOR’S NOTE: This is part of a series that examines what communities in Lake County went through in 2021 and what they are facing in 2022. Madison Village continued to move closer in 2021 towards the start of a major infrastructure project. Design work has been completed for an interconnect that will direct sanitary wastewater […]]]>

EDITOR’S NOTE: This is part of a series that examines what communities in Lake County went through in 2021 and what they are facing in 2022.

Madison Village continued to move closer in 2021 towards the start of a major infrastructure project.

Design work has been completed for an interconnect that will direct sanitary wastewater from the village to the Lake County Utilities Department wastewater treatment plant on Dock Road in Madison Township.

“It will actually be a goal next year to install (the sanitary sewer interconnection),” said village administrator Dwayne Bailey.

In a recent interview with The News-Herald, Bailey recapped some of the village’s top achievements in 2021 and top priorities for 2022.

Here are some of the biggest projects and efforts made through the efforts of the Madison Village government during the current year:

• The village has a new service garage.

“It’s a really nice building that belonged to Lake County and they no longer had use of, and we were able to move our after sales service to a much more modern and much nicer building,” Bailey said. .

Madison Village acquired this service garage on Samuel Street earlier this year. Lake County, which previously owned and occupied the garage, decided it no longer had any use for the building. The county therefore donated the garage to Madison Village. For the village, this building is much more modern and functional than its old service garage. (Bill DeBus – The News-Herald)

Madison Village Service didn’t have to travel far to move their trucks and equipment to the Lake County Satellite Road garage. Indeed, the two buildings are located next to each other on Samuel Street.

Lake County decided to leave the garage earlier this year for several reasons.

“With the pandemic returning and other issues, they decided to bring these guys (who worked at Madison’s satellite garage) back to their main campus, and it seemed to work better for them,” he said. .

Madison Village received the building “essentially as a donation of goods that are no longer useful, from one political subdivision to another,” Bailey explained.

“It was a pleasant surprise,” he said.

• The village has added another full-time officer to its police department.

Bailey said Madison Village is keen to increase the size of its police force to keep up with the community’s residential and business growth.

• The village has partnered with Madison Community Improvement Corp. to organize a very successful concert series in Madison Village Park.

“And the outdoor market has also grown by leaps and bounds,” Bailey said.

Seated author Katherine Kerestman sells copies of her book, “Creepy Cat’s Macabre Travels,” during the opening night of the 2021 Madison Village outdoor market on June 3. A life-size mummy stands by her table, doing her part to attract customers. (Submitted)

The village open-air market and concerts in the park take place on Thursday evenings during a season which usually runs from early June to late August.

Vendors sell their wares at the open-air market from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m., while concerts start at 7 p.m. and end at 9 a.m. Both events are based at Village Park, located on West Main and River Streets.

• Madison Village has established a downtown outdoor refreshment zone, or DORA, in a limited section of the community.

A DORA allows licensed liquor establishments in a designated area to sell alcohol in specially marked cups, and adults are permitted to take these cups outside establishments in a specific area for a specified period of time.

The Madison Village DORA encompasses the park and village square; West Main Street, between River Street and East Main Street; and North Lake Street from its southernmost point to the railway line.

Six dining establishments were authorized to participate: Duffy’s Tavern; Young’s Sushi Bar, which was recently reopened by new owners as Osaka Sushi House and Bar; Cornerstone Brewing Co.; tavern 528; Mexican restaurant Wild Burrito; and Quigley’s Squarerigger Saloon.

The launch of the village DORA coincided with the start of the 2021 season of the Open Air Market and Concerts in the Park. Thus, adults were able to enjoy alcoholic beverages while attending these events.

“This year has been kind of a smooth opening with DORA, and it’s been very successful, very well regarded,” Bailey said.

• The village received a H2Ohio grant to restore wetlands adjacent to Madison Senior Center on Hubbard Road.

“This (project) will ultimately provide, among other things, yellow warbler habitat and high-rank wetlands, and we seek to follow up on this wetland restoration by providing a walkway accessible to people with disabilities so that people can bird watch and walk around, ”Bailey said.

Throughout 2021, Madison Village government officials have also been monitoring the progress of new businesses that are currently being developed or will soon be built in the community. These efforts include:

• Camping World, which sells recreational vehicles and related products and services, plans announced to build a new RV dealership at the end of Water Tower Drive, near the Interstate 90 and Route 528 interchange

“They’re in the clearance process right now, so we’re very excited about it,” Bailey said.

• Construction begins on a new road, called the Great Lakes Way, in the new Grand River Gateway Business Park. This site is located near the southeast side of Interstate 90 and Route 528.

Bailey said work on the road was nearing completion.

The business park will be anchored by the future world headquarters of Great Lakes Power Products.

• Two events occurred in 2021 that will bring more activity to Sidley Business Park, which is based on the northeast corner of the Interstate 90 and Route 528 interchange.

In June, the Meyer RV Superstores bought the Mentor RV dealer located on RW Parkway in the Sidley Business Park.

Meyer has also acquired most of the remaining undeveloped land on RW Parkway and “has pretty ambitious expansion plans there,” Bailey said.

Separately, Hissong Group Inc. has purchased another section of land available on RW Parkway and has announced its desire to build a business on the site that sells and services Kenworth heavy trucks.

Between the proposed new Kenworth concessionaire and the purchase by Meyer RV Superstores of additional unused land in the Sidley Business Park, only one of the other two lots would still be available for development along the RW Parkway.

Regarding Madison Village’s main goals for 2022, Bailey mentioned these efforts:

• Solicit bids for the construction of the sanitary sewer interconnection project.

A contractor recently completed a cultural resource assessment of the land that would be excavated during the sanitary sewer interconnection, Bailey said. This assessment was an Ohio EPA environmental requirement that had to be completed before construction began.

“(The Cultural Resource Assessment) is where they go out and do minor digs and look for arrowheads and human remains and clay pots and stuff like that,” he said.

Bailey, in an email Dec. 29, said he had just received a formal report on the assessment, which he intended to review and submit to the Ohio EPA promptly.

If the state agency confirms that the Madison construction project will not negatively impact cultural or historical resources, the village may seek bids from potential contractors.

“Hopefully we get this (project contract) awarded by March, at the latest, to start construction,” Bailey said.

• Develop the village’s outdoor market by registering more vendors and improve concerts in the park by reserving new musical numbers that attract additional spectators.

• Complete the wetland restoration project near Madison Senior Center by summer 2022.

Village government leaders also hope to see the ground shattered in 2022 for the Camping World RV dealership; the Sheetz convenience store at the northwest corner of the I-90 and Route 528 interchange; and the Love’s Travel Stop store on the southwest side of I-90 and Route 528.

Although Great Lakes Power Products hosted a groundbreaking event in July for the Global Business Park Project, Bailey believes the company could hold another ceremony, possibly by fall 2022, when construction of its real world headquarters will begin.


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Uranium Energy Corp Completes Acquisition of Uranium One Americas; largest uranium mining company in the United States https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/uranium-energy-corp-completes-acquisition-of-uranium-one-americas-largest-uranium-mining-company-in-the-united-states/ Sat, 01 Jan 2022 09:31:03 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/uranium-energy-corp-completes-acquisition-of-uranium-one-americas-largest-uranium-mining-company-in-the-united-states/ Uranium Energy Corp. (UEC) recently acquired all issued and outstanding shares of Uranium One Americas (U1A), Inc. for an aggregate purchase price of $ 112 million in cash plus estimated additional working capital of $ 2.9 million (primarily prepaid insurance and land payments) and the assumption of $ 19 million in reclamation bond. Uranium One […]]]>

Uranium Energy Corp. (UEC) recently acquired all issued and outstanding shares of Uranium One Americas (U1A), Inc. for an aggregate purchase price of $ 112 million in cash plus estimated additional working capital of $ 2.9 million (primarily prepaid insurance and land payments) and the assumption of $ 19 million in reclamation bond. Uranium One is the world’s fourth largest producer of uranium and is part of the Russian state atomic energy company, Rosatom.

UEC fully funded the acquisition with existing cash. After closing, UEC holds approximately $ 120 million in cash and cash equivalents.

U1A’s portfolio of projects being acquired includes, among other assets, seven projects in the Powder River Basin, three of which are fully licensed, and five in the Great Divide Basin. The portfolio consists of dozens of under-explored mineralized brownfield projects, supported by detailed databases of historical uranium exploration and development programs, greatly improving the potential for resource expansion.

We are very pleased to have concluded this very accretive transaction for UEC. The acquisition doubles our production capacity in three key categories: total number of US SRIs authorized [in-situ recovery] projects, resources and processing infrastructure. In addition, the opportunity to have acquired a state-of-the-art asset base of this quality from one of the world leaders in the nuclear energy industry is quite unique.

With this acquisition, UEC’s industry-leading US SRI production profile grows to 6.5 million U pounds.3oh8 per year based on the licensed and installed capacity of our Wyoming and South Texas hub operations. Combined with our physical uranium holdings of 4.1 million pounds of uranium stored in the United States, we now have the unmatched ability to provide a reliable domestic supply to the United States government as well as nuclear utilities while providing our shareholders exposure to the fastest growing, 100% unhedged and pure-play uranium business listed on the NYSE American.

—Amir Adnani, President and CEO

ISR is an injection solution extraction that reverses the natural process that deposited uranium in the sandstones. The site’s groundwater is enriched with gaseous oxygen and introduced into the body of uranium ore through a network of injection wells. The solution dissolves the uranium from the host sandstone.

The uranium solution is brought to the surface through production wells where the uranium is concentrated on resin beads to be trucked to the company’s Hobson processing plant for further concentration and yellowcake drying. for the market. This model of an injection and recovery well, along with the surrounding control wells that serve as protection, is called a well field.

U1A’s assets are primarily located in the Powder River Basin in Wyoming; the most productive in situ recovered uranium mining district in the western hemisphere. Other highlights of the acquisition are as follows:

  • The largest uranium mining company in the United States. Positions UEC, an American company headquartered in Texas, as the largest American uranium mining company.

  • Wyoming Hub and Spoke. Creates hub-and-spoke operations in Wyoming for UEC, anchored at U1A’s Irigaray plant, one of the largest central processing facilities in the United States with an authorized capacity of 2.5 million U pounds3oh8 per year.

  • Ready for production. Incorporates production-ready assets of U1A, including the ISR Christensen Ranch project with four fully installed wellfields and six other satellite ISR projects authorized or under development, combined with UEC’s Reno Creek project.

  • Synergies of Reno Creek. Expects significant capital expense savings and significant operating synergies with the licensed and near UEC Reno Creek ISR project, which is 45 miles from the Irigaray plant.

  • Expansion of resources. Raised around 37.6 million U pounds3oh8 in historically estimated measured and indicated resources and 4.3 million U pounds3oh8 in historically estimated inferred resources with considerable growth potential based on independent technical reports prepared for U1A.

  • Dominant Lands Package. The acquisition added approximately 100,000 acres to UEC’s current land pool in Wyoming, resulting in the company owning approximately 118,000 acres in the prolific Wyoming, Power River and Great Uranium Basins. Divide.

The UEC presented several initiatives aimed at integrating U1A assets into the UEC portfolio. They include:

  • The company plans to complete and submit new technical reports on late stage projects in the U1A portfolio as soon as possible for the purpose of establishing current resources, as historical U1A resources are not treated as current by UEC.

  • Advance technical studies to further develop Wyoming’s hub and spoke strategy in order to capture the significant investment savings and operating synergies expected with its Reno Creek project.

  • The U1A portfolio includes other brownfield mineralized projects that UEC intends to develop to generate technical resource reports.

  • Perform an operational review on the potential expansion of the Irigaray central processing plant.

  • In addition to Reno Creek, advance the Moore Ranch and Ludeman ISR projects in Wyoming as satellite production facilities as well as the company’s development plans in Burke Hollow in South Texas.

  • Examine and incorporate the significant tax loss carryforwards of U1 to be applied to offset future income.

Uranium Energy Corp is a United States-based uranium exploration and mining company that advances the next generation of ISR uranium mining projects. In South Texas, the company’s hub-and-spoke operations are anchored in the fully licensed Hobson processing facility, which is at the heart of the Palangana, Burke Hollow, Goliad and other ISR pipeline projects.

In Wyoming, UEC controls the Reno Creek project, which is the largest pre-construction ISR uranium project licensed in the United States.


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