Tribute to the only battalion in the army corps composed entirely of black women

Amid Buffalo Soldier Monument Park at Fort Leavenworth, the names of 841 remarkable women shine brightly. A monument dedicated in November 2018 honors the women of the 6888th or Six-Triple-Eight, the only all-black female corps battalion deployed to Europe during World War II. Carlton Philpot, the 6888th President and Project Manager for the 6888th Monument Projects, helped build the monument. “When they saw their names, some of them cried,” Philpot said. Women from across the United States were sent overseas to help with the large mail backlog, as morale was low for the troops. “Working 24/7 in cold, poorly lit, smelly buildings,” Philpot said. Lifting heavy bags daily, the unit consisted of 855 women, 10 women from Missouri and 15 from Kansas. They handled civilian, Red Cross, Marine, and Navy mail. There are only six women left alive. They broke all army records, sorting the mail of 7 million people in the postal directory with thousands of duplicates, and over 17 million parcel post in England alone and more in France. “They led the way,” said Sandra Ming Doyle, a retired lieutenant colonel. Ming Doyle draws inspiration from their heritage every day. “It’s the motivation and the catalyst that makes me want to be the best,” Ming Doyle said. Without a parade, medal or mention in the history books, she says the monument serves as a reminder of the respect due to all women who serve our country. “It’s the history we all want to uphold and make our ancestors proud of,” Ming told Doyle. She hopes it will inspire generations to come. “I want a little girl, a little brunette girl to say, if she can do it, I can do it,” she said. There’s a bill on the floor of the house that awards women a Congressional Gold Medal for their service. This vote is scheduled for February 28.

Amid Buffalo Soldier Monument Park at Fort Leavenworth, the names of 841 remarkable women shine brightly.

A monument dedicated in November 2018 honors the women of the 6888th or Six-Triple-Eight, the only all-black female corps battalion deployed to Europe during World War II.

Carlton Philpot, the 6888th President and Project Director for the 6888th Monument Projects, participated in the construction of the monument.

“When they saw their names, some of them cried,” Philpot said.

Women from across the United States were sent overseas to help with the large mail backlog, as morale was low for the troops.

“Working 24/7 in cold, poorly lit, smelly buildings,” Philpot said.

Lifting heavy bags daily, the unit consisted of 855 women, 10 women from Missouri and 15 from Kansas. They handled civilian, Red Cross, Marine, and Navy mail.

There are only six women still alive.

They broke all army records, sorting the mail of 7 million people in the postal directory with thousands of duplicates, and over 17 million parcel post in England alone and more in France.

“They led the way,” said Sandra Ming Doyle, a retired lieutenant colonel.

Ming Doyle draws inspiration from their heritage every day.

“It’s the motivation and the catalyst that makes me want to be the best,” Ming Doyle said.

Without a parade, medal or mention in the history books, she says the monument serves as a reminder of the respect due to all women who serve our country.

“This is the history we all want to uphold and make our ancestors proud of,” Ming Doyle said.

She hopes it will inspire generations to come.

“I want a little girl, a little brunette girl to say, if she can do it, I can do it,” she said.

There’s a bill on the floor of the house that rewards women with a Congressional Gold Medal for their service.

This vote is scheduled for February 28.

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