war ii – Hamline Midway History http://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 10:12:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/hamline-midway-history-icon-150x150.jpg war ii – Hamline Midway History http://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/ 32 32 Local Woman Taught Schools in Russellville, California for 42 Years https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/local-woman-taught-schools-in-russellville-california-for-42-years/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 10:12:24 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/local-woman-taught-schools-in-russellville-california-for-42-years/ Marie Wood encouraged the lives of thousands of students she taught during her four decades as an educator in high schools in Russellville and California. These experiences brought him unexpected recognition from his peers and provided him with many wonderful memories to reflect on during his retirement years. Born on her father’s birthday on August […]]]>

Marie Wood encouraged the lives of thousands of students she taught during her four decades as an educator in high schools in Russellville and California.

These experiences brought him unexpected recognition from his peers and provided him with many wonderful memories to reflect on during his retirement years.

Born on her father’s birthday on August 16, 1928, Wood was raised on her parents’ farm southwest of High Point. She attended a one-room school known as Prairie Hill School until eighth grade, then transferred to Eldon High School, where she graduated in 1946.

“I knew some people who had enrolled in Draughons Business School in Springfield, so I decided to go too,” she said. “The program lasted about a year, if I remember correctly.”

After graduating from the program, which taught several basic business skills, Wood was hired as a clerk for the Missouri Department of Education’s Institutional Farm Training Program in Jefferson City. The program helped World War II veterans who wanted to pursue a career in agriculture.

Wood recalls, “After about a year and a half, I decided to go back to school and got my associate degree at Southwest Baptist College (now the university) in Bolivar.

“When I graduated, I returned to the Missouri Department of Education, but this time as secretary to the director of home economics,” she added.

Two years into his second stint in state government, Wood took the final step toward achieving his educational goals by enrolling at Warrensburg College. She then obtained her bachelor’s degree as she prepared to embark on her career in education.

“The superintendent of Russellville came to Warrensburg in 1955 and interviewed me for a high school teaching job,” she said. “I was hired to teach business classes – it was basically business classes like accounting, typing and bookkeeping.”

Over the next few years, she taught professional business classes at Russellville High School while pursuing other opportunities such as serving as a class sponsor and accompanying students on senior trips. She also found pleasure in working closely with her students, helping to guide those who demonstrated specific abilities and interests.

“I was in his typing and accounting classes,” said Ron Klatt, a 1964 graduate of Russellville High School who later retired from a career at Central Bank in Jefferson City. “She encouraged me to pursue a profession in business, and I will be forever grateful to her for her guidance.”

On other occasions, she observed certain students whose boundless energy and personality imprinted on her memory.

“I always remember how Johnny Campbell answered a question I asked in class,” she smiles. “I asked him what a semicolon was, i.e. how it should be used. He said, ‘It’s a comma with a period.'”

Pausing, she added, “He wasn’t wrong; I guess I just phrased the question in a confusing way. But he was certainly an ambitious, outgoing young man…just full of life. “

Johnny Campbell graduated from Russellville High School in 1964. Just over three years later, he was killed while serving in Vietnam with the Marine Corps.

“He was the kind of person who went straight into the fight and didn’t try to avoid it,” she added.

In 1967, after teaching in Russellville for nearly 12 years, she was hired to teach business-related classes at California High School. As she explained, she chose to move to California because it would allow her to be closer to her parents.

As noted in the “Moniteau County, Missouri History” published in 2000, during the 1986-87 and 1993-94 school years, Wood received the honor of being selected as Outstanding Educator of the Year by his fellow members of the faculty.

She completed 30 years at California High School, retiring in 1997 with a total of 42 years of teaching under her belt. In the years following her retirement, she became involved in many volunteer opportunities in the community. In 2001, she was elected Distinguished Retired Teacher by the Morgan/Moniteau County Retired Teacher Association.

“Since her retirement, Marie has been busy working with the Daughters of American Colonists (DAC), OATS, and the Moniteau County Historical Society,” reported the Tipton Times on May 17, 2001. “Marie is a member of the First Baptist Church of California.”

The accolades continued for the retired teacher when she was recognized as OATS Volunteer of the Year for Moniteau County in the spring of 2005. OATS Transit is a nonprofit corporation that provides transportation for rural residents, elderly people and people with disabilities.

The setback that comes during her retirement years has not diminished the appreciation Wood has for the career path she has chosen. She has many fond memories that at any time can bring her comfort and lift her spirits.

“I can’t say I didn’t like any of the classes I taught, but I really enjoyed teaching accounting,” she said. “It was an interesting class to teach because I loved seeing how it all fit together…especially when the students came to understand it.”

“And in all the years I’ve been teaching, I can’t say I’ve had disrespectful students in my classes. Over my career,” she said, “I’ve taught about 4,000 students and I considered each of them ‘my children.'”

Jeremy P. Ämick is writing about the Russellville area for his upcoming book “Hidden History of Cole County”.





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Advice for living a century; celebrate with Marge Swenson https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/advice-for-living-a-century-celebrate-with-marge-swenson/ Tue, 08 Mar 2022 02:02:56 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/advice-for-living-a-century-celebrate-with-marge-swenson/ It’s not that unusual to see an Oak Ridger live to be 100 years old (which more or less disproves glow in the dark with the radiation theory). What’s super amazing about an Oak Ridger who’s about to do this — Tuesday, March 8 — is that she continues to live in her modified “B” […]]]>

It’s not that unusual to see an Oak Ridger live to be 100 years old (which more or less disproves glow in the dark with the radiation theory). What’s super amazing about an Oak Ridger who’s about to do this — Tuesday, March 8 — is that she continues to live in her modified “B” house, walks around the neighborhood almost every day (not requiring only a walker for a few years), cooks her own meals and converses with family and friends with the wit and intelligence of a 20-year-old.

Meet Marjorie “Marge” Swenson. Her quick wit, quick smile, and cheerful demeanor are the envy of almost everyone who knows her. This article is meant to celebrate Marge’s century on this planet and share insights into her own longevity. Mostly, she says, that’s how she grew up.

Born in Pipestone, Minnesota in 1922 to Eugene and Alice Clark, Marge grew up on a farm. She learned early on the value of families spending quality time with each other while working hard to get through tough times. She had an older brother, Larry, who was born with medical issues, so she grew up helping take care of him as one of her main duties. Later she cared for her husband’s mother and aunt and her own children. She then helped neighbors in need, worked for home health (mostly with elderly people), and then again for her brother later in life. Finally, Marge cared intensely for her husband towards the end of his life. She said she believes connecting with people and treating them well is vital to a person’s well-being. Keeping children in your life also helps you stay young.

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Bank of Ireland makes bold appeal for problem loans as Covid backs facility https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/bank-of-ireland-makes-bold-appeal-for-problem-loans-as-covid-backs-facility/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 18:27:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/bank-of-ireland-makes-bold-appeal-for-problem-loans-as-covid-backs-facility/ Bank of Ireland chief executive Francesca McDonagh is cautious at the best of times when it comes to making absolute predictions. But she showed it even more on Monday when she welcomed a slew of reporters to the bank’s nerve center on Baggot Street for the first time since the appearance of Covid-19 – on […]]]>

Bank of Ireland chief executive Francesca McDonagh is cautious at the best of times when it comes to making absolute predictions.

But she showed it even more on Monday when she welcomed a slew of reporters to the bank’s nerve center on Baggot Street for the first time since the appearance of Covid-19 – on the second anniversary of the initial official affair in Republic.

“The last two years have taught us that things can go and go, so it’s hard to be too prescriptive and definitive,” she said.

However, even as global markets have succumbed to heightened volatility over the past five days after Russian President Vladimir Putin unleashed a wave of attacks on Ukraine – triggering Europe’s biggest geopolitical crisis since World War II. global – McDonagh’s outlook for the bank is more optimistic than at any stage since she took the reins 4½ years ago.

profit

After delivering a much better-than-expected net profit of over €1 billion for 2021 (helped by the release of some of the bad debt provisions it had set aside a year earlier), McDonagh unveiled its intention to return €100 million to shareholders.

Half of the money will be returned under the group’s first share buyback program since 2004, before the financial crisis.

Even taking that cash return into account, the bank’s Common Equity Tier 1 capital ratio – a key measure of financial strength and the ability to withstand a shock loss – came in at 16%. .

That’s 1 percentage point above market consensus expectations, more than 6 points above its minimum regulatory requirement and 3 points above the bank’s internal target.

That’s an impressive result for a bank that, let’s face it, has been coping since the financial crisis with tighter levels of excess capital than its market peers.

But the big surprise is that while investors and credit rating agencies have long feared that non-performing loans (NPLs) will rise across the board this year amid extraordinary economic support from the central bank and government Covid -19 are eased, the Bank of Ireland sticking its neck out early saying its NPL ratio should actually fall this year from 5.5% in December.

Solutions

Chief Financial Officer Myles O’Grady said while the bank expects “inflows” of non-performing loans in 2022, the rapid pace at which the bank’s restructuring team is working to find solutions for struggling borrowers should lead to an overall decline in NPLs.

The decline is expected to accelerate as the bank plans to continue a recent trend of selling portfolios of long-overdue loans.

O’Grady, of course, won’t be around to see if the prediction works out, as he will leave banking at the end of next month to join food wholesaler and retailer Musgraves. But his current boss will.

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UNCG Online Conference Focuses on Veteran Black Women | Education https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/uncg-online-conference-focuses-on-veteran-black-women-education/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 22:28:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/uncg-online-conference-focuses-on-veteran-black-women-education/ I first heard about the Veteran Women’s History Project in 2000, when I was looking for a way to kill someone in the Rare Book Room of the Jackson Library at UNCG. I was writing the first chapter of a mystery story serialized in the News and recording and wished to place my fictional murder […]]]>

I first heard about the Veteran Women’s History Project in 2000, when I was looking for a way to kill someone in the Rare Book Room of the Jackson Library at UNCG.

I was writing the first chapter of a mystery story serialized in the News and recording and wished to place my fictional murder there. One of the librarians happily suggested that the lethal weapon was the real Headhunter’s machete that a World War II air nurse had given to the university when it was still Woman’s College. , which had just been added to the recently created historical archives.

I was curious but was only an occasional journalist then, so I forgot for 22 years. But last week, UNC University Greensboro Libraries announced that Beth Ann Koelsch, curator of the Women Veterans Historical Project, will discuss the history of African American women in the US military and the American Red Cross. in a live Zoom broadcast which would then be posted on YouTube.

Remembering my long-time intention to find out more about the project, I contacted Koelsch and asked him to say YES! Weekly how it started. She told me that the Veteran Women’s History Project was established in 1998, two years before I was shown this mean-looking weapon that a Borneo guerrilla resisting the Imperial Japanese Army had given to a United States Army flight nurse.

“It was founded by Betty H. Carter,” Koelsch wrote via email. Carter, born in North Carolina, grew up in Rowan County and earned degrees from Meredith College and Duke University.

“She began working in the Special Collections and Academic Archives Department of the UNCG Library in 1974 and retired in 2010 as an Academic Archivist. While working with women in the Class of 1950 on planning their class reunion, she learned that some of their classmates were World War II veterans. Betty had no idea that American women had served in the war and after some research she realized that there were no research archives dedicated to preserving the history of women who served. in the army.

The project was founded to remedy this and, after her retirement, was named the Betty H. Carter Women Veterans Historical Project in her honor. After Carter passed away in September 2021. University archivist Erin Lawrimore wrote this about her in UNCG News:

“Betty was a strong advocate for our university’s history and worked diligently to preserve and share the history of UNCG’s past. Her work to establish the Veteran Women’s Historical Project also ensured that the often hidden stories of women in military service would be recorded. His work laid the foundation for our research collections that are widely used today and often hidden away and will be available long into the future.

Koelsch, who became the project’s curator in 2008, said that from the beginning Carter included the oral histories of black women veterans, and that inclusion continues to this day.

“The first collection that focused on a black woman’s experience in the military was that of Inez Stroud, whose niece donated her late aunt’s gear in 1998.”

Born in Wilmington, Inez Naomi Stroud (1909-1994) served in the United States Women’s Army Corps and then in the United States Army from 1943 to 1969. A graduate of the Alice Freeman Palmer Memorial Institute in Sedalia, she joined the WAC in 1943. She served at various facilities in the United States and Europe, including three tours of Germany, and was organist for post chapels and saxophonist in the band WAC. After her release in 1969, she continued her education at North Carolina A&T State University in Greensboro.

Koelsch said that despite this early acquisition, records of more black female servicemen were initially difficult to obtain, due to the project’s initial focus on the Women’s College that would become the UNCG, and which would not admit its first two black female students, JoAnne Smart. and Bettye Tillman, until the fall of 1958, four years after Brown v. Topeka Board of Education.

“Initially, the fundraising focused on World War II veterans who were Women’s College (now UNCG) alumni. Since the Women’s College was a segregated institution at the time, it was for white women. However, the WVHP quickly expanded its collection focus and worked actively to find black veterans. It was a challenge because until 1948 the US military was separate and as a result there were fewer black women serving in World War II. As the number of black women in the services grew and the reputation of the WVHP spread, we were able to add many more oral history materials and interviews with women of color to the collections. .

Koelsch told me about two of the women she would talk about in her webcast.

One is Raleigh-born Millie Dunn Veasey (1918-2018), who enlisted in 1942 in the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps. After completing his overseas training in Georgia, Veasey was selected for the all-African-American 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion for overseas service. She served as a company clerk in Birmingham, England, before being transferred to Rouen, France in the summer of 1945 to work as a supply clerk. She was discharged with a final rank of staff sergeant in 1945 and had a long career at Saint Augustine’s College in Raleigh.

Another, retired Brigadier General Clara Leach Adams-Ender, is still with us.

Born on a tobacco farm in Willow Springs, North Carolina in 1939, she graduated from A&T at age 16 and participated in the Woolworth Sit-In. After graduating, she was commissioned as a second lieutenant in the Army Nurse Corps. From 1964 to 1967, she attended and then taught at the United States Army Medical Training Center at Fort Sam Houston.

After earning a master’s degree in medical-surgical nursing, Adams-Ender taught at the Walter Reed Army Institute of Nursing, where she was appointed education coordinator. In 1974, she became the first woman and the first nurse to earn a master’s degree in military arts and science from the United States Army Command and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth.

In 1982, she became the first black nurse to graduate from the Army War College, then became the first black head of the nursing department at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. In 1987, she was promoted to brigadier general and appointed head of the Army Nurse Corps. In 1991, she became the first Army nurse and the first black woman to command a major military base, when she was appointed commanding general at Fort Belvoir, Virginia. Adams-Ender retired from the military in 1993 and later started a management consulting firm. In 2001, she published My Ascent to the Stars: How a Farmer’s Daughter Became an Army General.

Koelsch’s lecture on these and other women is posted on the UNCG Special Collections and University Archives YouTube channel.

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Tribute to the only battalion in the army corps composed entirely of black women https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/tribute-to-the-only-battalion-in-the-army-corps-composed-entirely-of-black-women/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 02:15:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/tribute-to-the-only-battalion-in-the-army-corps-composed-entirely-of-black-women/ Amid Buffalo Soldier Monument Park at Fort Leavenworth, the names of 841 remarkable women shine brightly. A monument dedicated in November 2018 honors the women of the 6888th or Six-Triple-Eight, the only all-black female corps battalion deployed to Europe during World War II. Carlton Philpot, the 6888th President and Project Manager for the 6888th Monument […]]]>

Amid Buffalo Soldier Monument Park at Fort Leavenworth, the names of 841 remarkable women shine brightly. A monument dedicated in November 2018 honors the women of the 6888th or Six-Triple-Eight, the only all-black female corps battalion deployed to Europe during World War II. Carlton Philpot, the 6888th President and Project Manager for the 6888th Monument Projects, helped build the monument. “When they saw their names, some of them cried,” Philpot said. Women from across the United States were sent overseas to help with the large mail backlog, as morale was low for the troops. “Working 24/7 in cold, poorly lit, smelly buildings,” Philpot said. Lifting heavy bags daily, the unit consisted of 855 women, 10 women from Missouri and 15 from Kansas. They handled civilian, Red Cross, Marine, and Navy mail. There are only six women left alive. They broke all army records, sorting the mail of 7 million people in the postal directory with thousands of duplicates, and over 17 million parcel post in England alone and more in France. “They led the way,” said Sandra Ming Doyle, a retired lieutenant colonel. Ming Doyle draws inspiration from their heritage every day. “It’s the motivation and the catalyst that makes me want to be the best,” Ming Doyle said. Without a parade, medal or mention in the history books, she says the monument serves as a reminder of the respect due to all women who serve our country. “It’s the history we all want to uphold and make our ancestors proud of,” Ming told Doyle. She hopes it will inspire generations to come. “I want a little girl, a little brunette girl to say, if she can do it, I can do it,” she said. There’s a bill on the floor of the house that awards women a Congressional Gold Medal for their service. This vote is scheduled for February 28.

Amid Buffalo Soldier Monument Park at Fort Leavenworth, the names of 841 remarkable women shine brightly.

A monument dedicated in November 2018 honors the women of the 6888th or Six-Triple-Eight, the only all-black female corps battalion deployed to Europe during World War II.

Carlton Philpot, the 6888th President and Project Director for the 6888th Monument Projects, participated in the construction of the monument.

“When they saw their names, some of them cried,” Philpot said.

Women from across the United States were sent overseas to help with the large mail backlog, as morale was low for the troops.

“Working 24/7 in cold, poorly lit, smelly buildings,” Philpot said.

Lifting heavy bags daily, the unit consisted of 855 women, 10 women from Missouri and 15 from Kansas. They handled civilian, Red Cross, Marine, and Navy mail.

There are only six women still alive.

They broke all army records, sorting the mail of 7 million people in the postal directory with thousands of duplicates, and over 17 million parcel post in England alone and more in France.

“They led the way,” said Sandra Ming Doyle, a retired lieutenant colonel.

Ming Doyle draws inspiration from their heritage every day.

“It’s the motivation and the catalyst that makes me want to be the best,” Ming Doyle said.

Without a parade, medal or mention in the history books, she says the monument serves as a reminder of the respect due to all women who serve our country.

“This is the history we all want to uphold and make our ancestors proud of,” Ming Doyle said.

She hopes it will inspire generations to come.

“I want a little girl, a little brunette girl to say, if she can do it, I can do it,” she said.

There’s a bill on the floor of the house that rewards women with a Congressional Gold Medal for their service.

This vote is scheduled for February 28.

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VA scientist first to show viruses can cause cancer https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/va-scientist-first-to-show-viruses-can-cause-cancer/ Fri, 18 Feb 2022 14:05:54 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/va-scientist-first-to-show-viruses-can-cause-cancer/ A longtime VA scientist, Dr. Ludwig Gross was one of the great pioneers of cancer research and the father of modern retrovirology. Gross, who served in the US Army Medical Corps during World War II, discovered the first two mammalian cancer viruses in the 1950s and was the first scientist to demonstrate that mammalian leukemia […]]]>

A longtime VA scientist, Dr. Ludwig Gross was one of the great pioneers of cancer research and the father of modern retrovirology.

Gross, who served in the US Army Medical Corps during World War II, discovered the first two mammalian cancer viruses in the 1950s and was the first scientist to demonstrate that mammalian leukemia was transmitted by a virus. He showed that murine leukemia virus and parotid tumor virus could cause cancer when injected into laboratory species.

Both of these viruses are retroviruses. A retrovirus has RNA instead of DNA as its genetic material. The virus that causes AIDS, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), is a type of retrovirus.

“Laid the foundation” for future scientific work

At first, some scientists questioned his findings, believing it unlikely that viruses could cause such a complex disease as cancer. But other scientists, inspired by his experiments, later came to similar conclusions. After his work was published, other viruses capable of causing solid or blood-borne tumors in mice were described by pioneering scientists such as Arnold Graffi, Charlotte Friend and John Moloney.

In 1974, Gross received the prestigious Lasker Award for his discovery of what became known as the Gross mouse leukemia virus. His work in the 1950s, the Lasker Foundation said, opened up the field of mammalian tumor virology and “laid the foundation for the later discovery by others of cancer-inducing viruses in animals of various species.” ranging from rodents to higher primates”.

The Lasker Foundation also said: “To Dr. Gross, who stood up to protracted skepticism, granted his discoveries with tenacious experimentation and insight, and who succeeded in changing the course of medicine, this medical research award fundamental Albert Lasker of 1974 is awarded.”

Escaped occupied Poland after the Nazi invasion in 1940

Gross was born on September 11, 1904 in Krakow, Poland to a prominent Jewish family. He was interested in medicine from an early age and studied for a medical degree at the Jagiellonian University in Krakow. He then trained in internal medicine at St. Lazar General Hospital, also in Krakow, in the early 1930s. Shortly after the Nazi invasion of Poland in 1940, he escaped from Poland occupied and traveled to the United States, where he studied tumor immunology at Christ Hospital in Cincinnati and enlisted as a captain in the US Army Medical Corps during World War II.

When the war ended, Gross was assigned to the Bronx Veterans Hospital in New York. He remained there after leaving the service and became the head of cancer research in 1946.

According to a biography of Gross written by Dr. Robert C. Gallo for the National Academy of Sciences, Gross got his big break in 1951 after attending a conference about a virus that could only infect nursing mice. Gallo, co-founder of the Institute of Human Virology, rose to fame in 1984 when he co-discovered HIV as the cause of AIDS.

Author of a reference work on the virology of tumors

When Gross returned to his lab and tried his filtered extracts on lactating mice instead of the adult mice he was using, Gallo wrote, he was able to transmit leukemia. This marked the first demonstration of virally transmitted leukemia in mammals, according to Gallo. Leukemia is a progressive disease in which the bone marrow and other blood-forming organs produce an increased number of abnormal cells. These cells suppress the production of normal blood cells, leading to anemia and other symptoms.

“It was far from generally accepted,” Gallo wrote. “Corn [Gross] found support from fellow researchers, especially Albert Sabin, a fellow Polish Jew who went on to develop oral polio vaccination. Eventually the virus, called Gross Passage A, was available to ship to other researchers. This virus, known as macroscopic leukemia virus, was the first mammalian retrovirus to be discovered. His discovery inspired other researchers to identify many other mammalian retroviruses, many of which expressed as leukaemias, lymphomas or sarcomas in their respective host species.

Eventually Gross accumulated enough data in his study of viruses to write a detailed monograph—Oncogenic viruses—the first history of tumor virology. Published in 1970, it became a standard reference work and marked the emergence of tumor virology as a distinct and legitimate field of study. It is considered a leading source book for early work in the discovery of carcinogenic viruses.

In 1999, Gross died of stomach cancer at the age of 94. The National Library of Medicine keeps a collection of his personal papers.

More information

Click here to read the VA Scholars Who Served series.

Click here to learn more about VA research.

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Huntington Beach says goodbye to Rodgers Seniors’ Center https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/huntington-beach-says-goodbye-to-rodgers-seniors-center/ Sat, 12 Feb 2022 00:02:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/huntington-beach-says-goodbye-to-rodgers-seniors-center/ City of Huntington Beach leaders, staff and residents gathered Friday morning to say goodbye to the Michael E. Rodgers Seniors’ Center. The center, located for decades on Orange Avenue, is being demolished. A new 2.01 acre park will be built in its place. “The community recognized that it was time to evolve this space,” said […]]]>

City of Huntington Beach leaders, staff and residents gathered Friday morning to say goodbye to the Michael E. Rodgers Seniors’ Center.

The center, located for decades on Orange Avenue, is being demolished. A new 2.01 acre park will be built in its place.

“The community recognized that it was time to evolve this space,” said Huntington Beach Mayor Barbara Delgleize. “I’ve always been a huge supporter of our wonderful network of parks, and love that we’re a community that knows the importance of continuing to improve our existing 78 parks, and even one more open space.”

The Rodgers Seniors’ Center became expendable when the city opened the Senior Center at Central Park in 2016. Randy Pesqueira, the director of the Senior Center at Central Park, began working at the Rodgers site in 1999.

He said the aging baby boomer generation has created the need for more space.

“I started here in my 40s and now I’m in my 60s, so I’ve been a senior all the way,” Pesqueira said at Friday’s ceremony. “What we’ve learned working here is the respect we should give to our elders. Seniors don’t like change, but seniors are also very flexible. They taught us to live and grow old. You don’t get lessons on aging…but that’s where those lessons are taught.

Local dignitaries including U.S. Representative Michelle Steel, Mayor Barbara Delgleize, Councilwoman Natalie Moser and others throw a shovel of dirt at the groundbreaking for a new park at the location of Rodgers Seniors’ on Friday. Center.

(Scott Smeltzer / staff photographer)

In July 2020, the Huntington Beach City Council approved a site redevelopment plan for the Rodgers Seniors’ Center. A contract worth nearly $2.4 million was awarded last December to Legion Contractors Inc.

The existing outreach building on the property will remain in use by the American Legion Huntington Beach Post 133.

The Rodgers Seniors’ Center was originally a Santa Ana Army Air Force Base building, Building T-1099. The city allowed Tom Talbert to purchase it for $4,117 in 1949, and it was moved to its current location.

“It was an interesting time, as our municipal leaders and community members were very concerned about the effects of World War II on our youth and high school students,” said Kathie Schey, chair of the Historic Resources Board. of Huntington Beach and city archivist. “[They wanted] young people to have a place to gather and develop skills. Under the watchful eye of responsible adults, it would be truly meaningful and transformative in our city. »

Although it might be hard to believe now, Schey said at the time that the area had no residential properties, just oil wells and other drilling rigs.

“That made it an asset,” she said. “That meant they could have the teenagers here, close enough that they could access them, but far enough from any residents that they were a nuisance and caused a lot of noise.”

Randy Pesqueira, the director of the Senior Center in Central Park, speaks during Friday's ceremony.

Randy Pesqueira, the director of the Senior Center in Central Park, speaks during Friday’s ceremony.

(Scott Smeltzer / staff photographer)

Over time, the use of the building was expanded to include more groups. It was renovated and dedicated as a Senior Center in 1975. Another renovation took place in 1983, along with a name change to honor Michael E. Rodgers, a senior attorney and founding member of the Huntington Beach Council on Aging.

“The Council on Aging has created programming, including a famous New Year’s Eve dance,” Pesqueira said. “People got their furs out for this dance, okay? They took out their beautiful coats, their dresses with bracelets, and they danced until midnight.

The mood for Friday’s ceremony was also celebratory, as local leaders grabbed shovels for a groundbreaking ceremony for the new park. They also placed flowers on the side of the Rodgers Seniors’ Center sign, which Schey said would be placed inside until demolition as a final tribute.

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William L. Ward, PFC, US Army Air Corps, WWII Japanese POW – The Andalusia Star-News https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/william-l-ward-pfc-us-army-air-corps-wwii-japanese-pow-the-andalusia-star-news/ Fri, 11 Feb 2022 22:34:10 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/william-l-ward-pfc-us-army-air-corps-wwii-japanese-pow-the-andalusia-star-news/ Author’s note: The original article published on January 29, 2022 has been updated with important information not available to the author at the time of writing. During World War II, the William Moses Ward family had three sons who served in the US Army Air Corps. The Ward family had the unfortunate distinction of having […]]]>

Author’s note: The original article published on January 29, 2022 has been updated with important information not available to the author at the time of writing.

During World War II, the William Moses Ward family had three sons who served in the US Army Air Corps. The Ward family had the unfortunate distinction of having two sons who became prisoners of war: Preston J “PJ” Ward of the Germans and Willie L “Willie” Ward of the Japanese. Marvin I. Ward served in the Army Air Corps in the European theater.

2n/a Lieutenant PJ Ward was the pilot of a B-17 shot down over Germany. His story was told in a previous article. Willie Ward was returned to the Philippines with nearly 85,000 American and Filipino soldiers defending the islands. When he was finally released from a POW camp at the end of the war, Willie had survived the Bataan Death Marchthe Cabanatuan Prisoner of war camp in the Philippines, a trip to mainland Japan aboard the infernal shipTaga MaruOsaka POW camp #12-B in Hirohata and the Nagoya POW camp #9B in Toyama. When Willie Ward was finally released in September 1945, he had been a prisoner of the Japanese for about 41 months. It’s hard to imagine a more amazing survival story than that of PFC Willie Ward.

William Lewis “Willie” Ward was born on October 25, 1918 in the community of Mobley Creek, Covington County, Alabama. His parents were William Moses and Mary Frances Hassel Ward. They lived near the William E. Ward, Sr. family. Both Ward families had several sons who served their country in World War II.

Willie attended area schools and graduated from Andalucia High School before joining the Army Air Corps in early 1940. He married Gladys L. Kay on September 10, 1941. At the time, Willie was a member of the 27and Bombardment group fire stationed at Barksdale Air Force Base near Bossier City, Louisiana. 27and began shipping to the Philippines via Savannah, Georgia in November 1941. Willie Ward was assigned to the Headquarters group, 27and bombardment group and left Savannah for the Philippines at the end of November. He arrived just before the Japanese attack on December 8 [because of the international dateline, that was the same day that Pearl Harbor was attacked].

Willie was a sights technician and part of the ground component of the 27and bombardment group stationed at Fort McKinley, just south of Manila. Their planes did not arrive in the Philippines before the Japanese attack and were redirected to Australia. The support staff of 27and bombardment groupincluding PFC Willie Ward, were trained in the 2n/a Battalion [27th Bombardment Group] Provisional Infantry Regiment [Air Corps]and sent to Bataan on 25 December. They were hastily evacuated from the Manila area and failed to bring adequate food and supplies, which made their defense of the Bataan Peninsula more difficult.

Memorial marker for the 27th Bombardment Group which left Savannah, Georgia, November through December 1941. The marker is located at the Andersonville National Historic Site near Andersonville, Macon County, Georgia. [Photo: Makali Bruton, Dec. 2017]

Willie Ward and the Men of the 27and bombardment group were returned to Bataan on April 9, 1942. They had the distinction of being the only Air Corps unit in history to fight as an infantry unit and be taken prisoner as a unit. After their surrender, they were forced to participate in the Bataan Death March. Of more than 800 airmen taken prisoner, less than half survived captivity. Corregidor and the Philippines were surrendered on May 6, 1942.

In August 1942 Willie’s sister Mrs. Lucille Ward Stephens received a telegram stating that he was “missing in action.” Willie and the captured Americans and Filipinos marched about 85 miles north to two prison camps, O’Donnell and Cabanatuan. Between 200 and 500 American prisoners died during the march. Records show Willie was taken to the Cabanatuan prison camp. Of the approximately 5,000 POWs held in the camp, over 2,764 burials have been recorded. Willie was one of the survivors who was eventually transferred to mainland Japan to be used as forced laborers.

On June 24, 1943, Willie’s sister Lucille received confirmation that Willie was a POW. In a telegram from the provost marshal general, she was informed that the International Red Cross had reported that “Your brother, Pvt. Willie L. Ward is a prisoner of the Japanese government in the Philippine Islands. It was the first information she had received since he had been reported missing in action.

In December 2020, an article was published by the National WW II Museum in New Orleans which described a diary written in pencil by a Cabanatuan Prisoner of war, Charles D. Page. The diary describes the lives of 212 prisoners of war who were members of the 27and bombardment group. The diary lists the men by name, rank, or grade, and indicates whether or not they survived by noting “D or dead. On the two pages reproduced for this article, there are 39 names listed with only 16 surviving.. One of the survivors listed on the front page is PFC Willie Ward.

After the war, Willie told a story to his cousins, Wyley and Richard Ward, about Bataan Death March. He said the Japanese guards would shoot anyone who fell from exhaustion. Willie said he walked with his hands on the shoulders of the man in front of him and took a cat nap as he walked. He was swapping positions with the man in front so he could do the same. That’s how he survived the march.

In May 1942, Japan had begun transferring POWs to mainland Japan by sea. Transport was called hell ships because of the appalling living conditions of the prisoners. They were crammed into holds with little ventilation, little food and water on voyages that could last for weeks. Because these ships carried a mixture of prisoners, Japanese troops, and cargo, they could not be marked as non-combatants and were therefore prime targets for Allied aircraft and submarines. More than 20,000 Allied prisoners of war died at sea when 15 of these transport ships were sunk.

PFC Willie Ward has been moved from Cabanatuan camp on September 20, 1943 and placed on the transport ship, Taga Maru. The journey took about 15 days and 70 of the 850 prisoners did not survive. Willie was taken to Osaka prison camp #12-B in Hirohata.

Captain Sidney Seid was the camp physician of the Hirohata prison camp. His records included PFC Willie Ward on page 34.
Prisoner #255 is PFC Willie Ward. Seid recorded “Buried in sand, April 1945”. [Photo: Defense Prisoner of War/Missing Personnel Office (DPMO]

Prisoners taken to Osaka prison camp #12-b in Hirohata were used as slaves at the Nippon Steel factory. Prisoners also worked at nearby shipping docks, loading and unloading ships. In April 1945, Willie was punished by being buried up to his neck in sand, which caused injuries to his chest and spine. The camp doctor, Captain Sidney Seid, took notes on each prisoner and recorded Ward’s injuries on page 34 of his diary. [as shown with this article].

Willie Ward and three other prisoners of war also suffered another form of torture at the Hirohata camp. the stars and stripes reported testimony from a war crimes trial that took place in Yokohama on March 22, 1946. Their March 23 edition included a report titled: “The Japs made the POWs squat 20 minutes in freezing water. An affidavit signed by PVT James W. Jones stated that he, PFC Willie Ward, PVT J. Clark and PFC Jesse M. Gibson were tortured by a Japanese Civil Guard, Shinichi Motoyashiki and another guard.

Jones testified that, “We were forced to undress and squat in this tub. The ice had been broken first. Motoyashiki and another guard forced the prisoner’s head underwater for about 10 seconds. Jones continued, “Gibson passed out. Then we were taken away and beaten with a club. We were frozen. Then we had to stand naked, at attention in the biting wind for about an hour. Another POW testified that the same guard forced prisoners to stand at attention with their arms outstretched for hours.

Records indicate that Willie was again transferred on May 21, 1945 to a prison in the Nagoya Prison Group. There were 14 individual POW camps in the Nagoya district and Willie was transferred to Nippon Express prison #9-B Toyama [Jinzu-Iwase] located in Toyama City, Toyama Prefecture. Willie was among 230 American prisoners and 119 British and Australian prisoners at No. 9-B. Conditions in this camp were better, as evidenced by the fact that only one POW died in the camp before its release in August.

After the camp was liberated, Willie’s family was informed that he had left Manila in September and was on his way home. The Andalusian Star notes in its November 1, 1945 edition that “Willie Lewis Ward had arrived in Andalucia last Friday for a brief visit with his sister, Mrs Harvey Stephens.” We can only imagine the reunion at the Ward house when Willie returned to find his brother, PJ Ward, who had returned home in June after two years in a German POW camp.

It was a great honor to tell the stories of two heroes such as the Ward brothers. The author remembers a line from the film, “The bridges of Toko Ri”, based on the book of the same name by James Michener. Actor Frederic March played the role of Admiral Tarrant, who had just lost one of his best pilots and a rescue helicopter. He exclaimed, “Where do we find such men? » The same could be said of the Ward brothers.

After the war, Willie Ward worked with his stepfather, Elijah Kay, who ran a planing mill near Florala, Alabama. It is possible that the mill was moved to Houston County as that is where Willie died on May 17, 1990. His wife Gladys died on January 20, 1995. They are both buried in Garden of Mercy Cemetery in Kinsey , Alabama. They had no children.

John Vic

Special Note from the Author: This remarkable story of survival against incredible odds is a testament to the courage, fortitude and triumph of one man’s human spirit – PFC. William Lewis “Willie” Ward of Covington County, Alabama. It is an honor and a privilege to tell his story.

[The author thanks Richard and Wyley Donald Ward for their recollections of their cousin, Willie Ward. Thanks also to Patrick Regan, whose grandfather was aboard the Taga Maru with Willie Ward and was also sent to the Hirohata prison camp. Thanks also to Mindy Kotler Smith who corrected some dates and information. She is a Japan analyst and advisor to the American Defenders of Bataan and Corregidor].

{Sources: Wikipedia; the book, “The unbreakable line by Mary Cathrin May; The National Museum of World War II article, Curator’s Choice, “The Book of the Dead and Dying”, December 9, 2020; National Archives Prologue Magazine item “American prisoners of war on Japanese ships take a trip to hell”, 2003, vol. 35, no. 4; Preliminary list of Japanese POW camps of all known POW camps in Japan, prepared for war crimes court proceedings, SCAP records; Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, Historical Report, “American Victims and Graves at Cabanatuan POW Camp”; The Andalusian Star dated article July 1, 1943; The Montgomery Advertiser article from August 30, 1942; The Andalusian Star article from November 1, 1945; the stars and stripesarticle from March 23, 1946; “The Bridges of Toko Ri” by James Michener]

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Mildred Davenport was a force on stage and on the war front https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/mildred-davenport-was-a-force-on-stage-and-on-the-war-front/ Sun, 06 Feb 2022 21:53:49 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/mildred-davenport-was-a-force-on-stage-and-on-the-war-front/ Mildred Davenport was chosen as the first black woman from the 1st Corps area to be chosen for the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps in 1942, when she was 40 years old. His deployment story reported that Davenport spoke three languages, had a background in religious and physical education, had done social work, and had been […]]]>
Mildred Davenport was chosen as the first black woman from the 1st Corps area to be chosen for the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps in 1942, when she was 40 years old. His deployment story reported that Davenport spoke three languages, had a background in religious and physical education, had done social work, and had been on stage for four years.Boston Globe Archive

This Black History Month, the Globe salutes black people in Massachusetts who have made a difference.

Mildred Davenport was a boundless dancer who graced the stage wherever she performed. Beyond her entertainment career, she was an unyielding leader as a city official and military officer.

Born in 1900 in Roxbury, Davenport went to C.C. Perkins Grade School and Prince School and graduated from Boston Girls’ High School in 1918. She then studied at Boston University’s Sargent School of Physical Training .

She then taught at Tuskegee University before returning to Boston, where she opened her first studio, the Davenport School of Dance.

During her dancing career, Davenport broke down barriers and carved out a path for herself as a performer. From 1930 to 1935, she performed in several African-American shows on Broadway, including “Fast and Furious”, “Flying Colors”, and “Black Birds”.

In 1938, after opening her second dance studio, Silver Box Studio in the South End, she became the first black woman to perform with the Arthur Fiedler Pops unit of the Boston Pops Orchestra. She has also been on numerous roadshows, including the Chocolate Revue and Hot Chocolates.

Her performing career ended when she enlisted in the army during World War II. There, she was one of the first black women in the Women’s Auxiliary Army Corps and later served as a special services officer, librarian, and counselor in the Bureau of Racial Affairs.

After the war, she returned to Boston to continue her advocacy work for the black community. She served on the board of the Boston chapter of the NAACP and worked for the Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination. She passed away in 1990, but her impact on the performing arts and black communities created a lasting legacy.


Grace Gilson can be reached at grace.gilson@globe.com.

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Historic Place Designation Facilitates Proposed Redevelopment of Fairview Building in Normal https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/historic-place-designation-facilitates-proposed-redevelopment-of-fairview-building-in-normal/ Thu, 03 Feb 2022 18:52:42 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/historic-place-designation-facilitates-proposed-redevelopment-of-fairview-building-in-normal/ A former health facility in Normal is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The county-owned Fairview Building was a tuberculosis sanitarium from 1919 to 1965. It then served as the offices of the McLean County Health Department until they moved to downtown Bloomington in the 1960s. 1990. “The building illustrates the significant […]]]>

A former health facility in Normal is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The county-owned Fairview Building was a tuberculosis sanitarium from 1919 to 1965. It then served as the offices of the McLean County Health Department until they moved to downtown Bloomington in the 1960s. 1990.

“The building illustrates the significant history of the methods developed for the treatment of tuberculosis, an extremely deadly communicable disease for which no cure was widely accepted until the end of World War II. Fairview has remained an essential part of the system McLean County Health Center at a time when the treatment of tuberculosis was becoming increasingly effective as a result of advances in procedures for identifying and improving infected patients,” said the Illinois Department of Natural Resources. who announced the designation.

The department’s state office of historic preservation had recommended the Fairview building for historic status along with 14 other sites in Illinois, including a 160-year-old farmhouse in Mercer County and a Chicago movie palace.

“Each of these places tells a unique story that is part of Illinois’ rich history. They provide a physical link to the past,” said Director of Natural Resources Colleen Callahan.

The National Register of Historic Places is the official list of properties that deserve special attention and preservation. In general, properties must be over 50 years old to be eligible for listing, the Department of Natural Resources said. A listing imposes no obligations on private owners, but makes properties eligible for certain financial incentives.

These incentives would help a proposed redeployment of the Fairview property off Main Street in Normal as affordable housing for seniors. The Laborers Home Development Corporation, an offshoot of the International Union of Workers, has proposed a 46-unit complex that depends in part on tax credits to fund construction.

“The existing structure will house some units, but this building will primarily house tenant services, such as a community room, tenancy manager office and maintenance staff office,” said Laborers Home representative Tim Ryan. Corporation, in January 2021.

The first application for these tax credits was not granted, which is not uncommon, Normal city staff said. A second application deadline is approaching.

The Laborers Home Development Corporation has renovated the former Bloomington High School in downtown Bloomington into affordable housing. And the company has also expressed interest in an affordable housing project in Uptown Normal, south of the train tracks, once the Uptown underpass is built.

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