History Detectives – Hamline Midway History http://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 19:51:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/hamline-midway-history-icon-150x150.jpg History Detectives – Hamline Midway History http://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/ 32 32 Police charge two men over alleged drug dealing outside Tewksbury business https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/police-charge-two-men-over-alleged-drug-dealing-outside-tewksbury-business/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 19:51:10 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/police-charge-two-men-over-alleged-drug-dealing-outside-tewksbury-business/ TEWKSBURY – Police arrested two men on Tuesday after detectives carrying out surveillance in the city observed suspected drug trafficking outside a gas station on Andover Street. Craig Pickering, 59, of Manchester, NH, was charged with three separate counts of possession with intent to distribute after he was found with 4 grams of fentanyl, 1 […]]]>

TEWKSBURY – Police arrested two men on Tuesday after detectives carrying out surveillance in the city observed suspected drug trafficking outside a gas station on Andover Street.

Craig Pickering, 59, of Manchester, NH, was charged with three separate counts of possession with intent to distribute after he was found with 4 grams of fentanyl, 1 gram of cocaine and 25 strips of Suboxone, according to a statement. press release from Tewksbury Police .

Police also charged Jason Ricciarelli, 42, of Lowell with possession of cocaine.

At the time of Ricciarelli’s arrest on Tuesday, police said he was wanted on a warrant issued by Lowell District Court. Documents available to the court say the warrant, issued last August, came after he failed to appear in court for threatening to commit a crime – a charge he received after allegedly threatening to kill another man and his dog.

Around 6 p.m. Tuesday, police said detectives were conducting a lookout in the Circle K area of ​​1795 Andover St. when they spotted what they believe was a drug transaction between a person in a vehicle and an employee of a neighboring company.

Police say detectives stopped the vehicle – which had a broken headlight – and identified Pickering as the driver.

In addition to the drugs, police said they discovered a digital scale, plastic bags and other drug paraphernalia inside Pickering’s vehicle. Police reports indicate that Pickering claimed he had a prescription for the Suboxone strips, but was unable to provide evidence.

Court documents also say Pickering has a “significant history of narcotics offences”, including cases pending in the Superior Courts of Middlesex and Lowell District.

Police said Ricciarelli – whom detectives identified as the employee involved in the alleged drug dealing with Pickering – was determined by police to have an outstanding warrant. Court documents indicate that while in police custody, Ricciarelli admitted to police that he was in possession of a quantity of cocaine which he had purchased and secreted into his buttocks. The drug was successfully retrieved.

According to court documents, Ricciarelli’s tenure follows a confrontation which occurred in the parking lot of Towne Place Suites, 20 International Place, Tewksbury, in August 2020.

During the confrontation, police heard Ricciarelli threatening to kill another man and his dog, according to court documents.

Ricciarelli, who was charged with threatening to commit a crime (murder), was one of three men arrested in the incident. After Ricciarelli allegedly failed to appear in Lowell District Court last August, a warrant was issued for his arrest.

For his latest charge, as well as the warrant, Ricciarelli was arraigned in Lowell District Court on Wednesday by Judge John Coffey. He was released on his own recognizance, with a return date set for August 10.

Pickering will be arraigned at a later date.

Follow Aaron Curtis on Twitter @aselahcurtis.

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Police arrest 2 suspects at Bellevue trail head ‘a crime spree’ https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/police-arrest-2-suspects-at-bellevue-trail-head-a-crime-spree/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 22:09:55 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/police-arrest-2-suspects-at-bellevue-trail-head-a-crime-spree/ If you’ve been hiking in the Bellevue area and your car was broken into recently, the police may have arrested the perpetrators. Bellevue police and King County sheriff’s deputies have arrested two people wanted in connection with “dozens and dozens” of cars prowling, primarily targeting local trail heads. The suspects allegedly used a tool to […]]]>

If you’ve been hiking in the Bellevue area and your car was broken into recently, the police may have arrested the perpetrators.

Bellevue police and King County sheriff’s deputies have arrested two people wanted in connection with “dozens and dozens” of cars prowling, primarily targeting local trail heads.

The suspects allegedly used a tool to smash car windows and take credit cards, IDs, key fobs and other valuables. According to police, the suspects then used the credit cards to purchase gift cards. They face 12 felony charges stemming from what Bellevue police call a “criminal spree.”

Several car break-ins have occurred at Coal Creek Trail Head in Bellevue. BPD released a video of such an incident.

Detectives located the suspects on June 8. They had stolen credit cards in their possession, as well as a stolen gun, according to BPD.

Detectives also believe the couple broke into several cars in the North Bend area and even shot some of their victims who broke up a chase. KCSO detectives said they assaulted a woman and stole her car as they fled once at the scene.

“These suspects brazenly entered parking lots in broad daylight, broke through windows, prowled dozens of cars, then immediately proceeded to stores to fraudulently use stolen credit cards,” Capt. Shelby Shearer said. “It happened at places all over the Puget Sound area. And we know from their criminal history that there was a propensity for violence and that we had to get them off the streets.

State troopers say they are working with other law enforcement agencies to increase patrols at local trailheads, especially now that more people are heading outdoors during the summer months.

The case is a good reminder to never leave valuables in a car.

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Where did the Black Death start? DNA detectives find a key clue https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/where-did-the-black-death-start-dna-detectives-find-a-key-clue/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 23:41:23 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/where-did-the-black-death-start-dna-detectives-find-a-key-clue/ Where and when was the Black Death born? The question has been asked for centuries and has sparked heated debate among historians. Now a group of researchers report that they have found the answer in the pulp of the teeth of people buried in the 14th century. Based on their analysis of preserved genetic material, […]]]>

Where and when was the Black Death born? The question has been asked for centuries and has sparked heated debate among historians.

Now a group of researchers report that they have found the answer in the pulp of the teeth of people buried in the 14th century.

Based on their analysis of preserved genetic material, the researchers report that the Black Death arrived in 1338 or 1339 near Issyk-Kul, a lake in a mountainous region just west of China in present-day Kyrgyzstan. . The plague first infected people in a small nearby trading colony eight years before devastating Eurasia, killing 60% of the population.

The survey was led by Wolfgang Haak and Johannes Krause of the Max Planck Institutes for Evolutionary Anthropology and the Science of Human History in Germany as well as Philip Slavin of the University of Stirling in Scotland, who described their findings on Wednesday in Nature.

What used to be called the Black Death – named after the black spots that appeared on the bodies of victims – is caused by a bacterium, Yersinia pestis, which is carried by fleas that live on rodents. The disease is still present today, carried by rodents on all continents except Australia. But infections are rare because hygiene is better. Infections are easily cured with antibiotics.

The 14th-century plague was actually the second major outbreak of Yersinia pestis — the first was the Plague of Justinian in the 6th century, said Mary Fissell, a medical historian at Johns Hopkins University. But the Black Death is the best known and is considered one of the deadliest epidemics in human history.

Its terrors were chronicled by Giovanni Boccaccio, an Italian writer and poet who lived through the plague when it hit Florence. The disease, he wrote, “showed its first signs in both men and women by means of swellings either in the groin or in the armpits, some of which reached the size of an ordinary apple and others the egg size, and people called them buboes”, which became known as “signs of impending death”.

Historians have traced the path of the epidemic – it apparently started in China or near China’s western border and moved along trade routes to Europe, North Africa and the Middle East. East.

But Monica Green, a medical historian and independent researcher who was not involved in the new paper, noted that historians will never be able to answer the question they have been asking: was it really Yersinia pestis that caused this massive pandemic?

“We hit a wall. We are historians and we deal with documents,” Green said.

She vividly remembers meeting a paleopathologist 20 years ago who was studying leprosy, which leaves visible marks on skeletons.

“When will you plague?” Green asked. She said the paleopathologist replied that they couldn’t study the plague because a disease that kills people so quickly leaves no marks on the bones.

Now this impasse is overcome.

Finding the origin of the plague “is like a detective story,” said Fissell, who was not involved in the new study. “Now they have very good evidence from the crime scene.”

The hunt goes back more than a decade, when the group that carried out the latest study stunned archaeologists with their report that they could find plague bacteria DNA in the teeth of skeletons.

This study involved plague victims in London.

Fourteenth-century Londoners knew the Black Death was coming, so they dedicated a cemetery ahead of time to prepare for its victims. The bodies were exhumed and are now kept in the Museum of London. The situation was ideal because not only did these victims come from a plague-stricken cemetery, but the date of their death was known.

“As an epidemiological case study, it’s perfect,” Green said. “The technical skill that has gone into this work has been nothing short of amazing.”

Since the London study, the group has analyzed the genetic material of plague victims at other sites, building a DNA family tree of variants of the plague bacterium. She and other researchers reported that the tree had a trunk and then suddenly seemed to explode into four branches of strains of Yersinia pestis whose descendants are found in rodents today. They called the event the Big Bang and began a quest to find out when and where it happened.

Historians have offered various dates, ranging from the 10th to the 14th century.

Slavin, a latecomer to the group that analyzed plague victims in Kyrgyzstan, said one of his dreams was to solve the riddle of the origins of the Black Death.

“I was aware of two Christian cemeteries in Kyrgyzstan and started digging,” he said.

To his delight, he discovered that hundreds of tombstones were precisely dated. Some bore inscriptions saying, in an ancient language, Syriac, that the person had died of “plague”. And the death rate of the population had skyrocketed the year these people died.

“It caught my attention because it wasn’t just any year,” Slavin said. It was in 1338, “just seven or eight years before the Black Death arrived in Europe”.

“We can’t ask for much more than to have headstones with the year,” he said.

Researchers found plague DNA in the teeth of three people whose headstones said they had died of “plague”.

The group also reports that the rodents that spread the bacteria to these victims were groundhogs. The marmots of this region today have fleas carrying a type of Yersinia pestis which seems to derive directly from the ancestral stock.

And researchers report that the stump in Kyrgyzstan comes from the trunk that exploded into four stumps. It’s the beginning of the Big Bang, the group proposes.

If they’re right, Fissell said, it appears the Big Bang happened just before the Black Death in Eurasia, indicating that the spread of the plague was most likely via trade routes and not, as some historians have suggested it, by military actions a century earlier.

Green and other historians have proposed that the Big Bang happened when the Mongols of the early 13th century spread the bacteria. But if that had been the case, the bacterium in Kyrgyzstan would have been from one of the branches and not the ancestral strain.

“These battles in the 1200s are pretty irrelevant,” Fissell said.

Green said she was convinced the group had found plague victims in Kyrgyzstan. But she said the evidence now available was insufficient to substantiate her bold claims.

“Stay tuned,” Green said, adding that she expected more evidence to emerge.

So far, she says, detective work has unearthed an important clue.

The artwork, she added, “puts a pin on the map, with a date.”

[This article originally appeared in The New York Times.]

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TV tonight: James Nesbitt locks horns with Joely Richardson in new thriller | Television & radio https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/tv-tonight-james-nesbitt-locks-horns-with-joely-richardson-in-new-thriller-television-radio/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 07:18:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/tv-tonight-james-nesbitt-locks-horns-with-joely-richardson-in-new-thriller-television-radio/ Suspicious 9 p.m., Channel 4 James Nesbitt does his familiar detective work again, but otherwise there’s nothing generic about this intriguing thriller that comes in eight well-written two-handed episodes. Nesbitt is Danny Frater, a veteran cop who shows up for a routine mortuary check to find his daughter Christina on the slab. Danny’s initial angst […]]]>

Suspicious

9 p.m., Channel 4

James Nesbitt does his familiar detective work again, but otherwise there’s nothing generic about this intriguing thriller that comes in eight well-written two-handed episodes. Nesbitt is Danny Frater, a veteran cop who shows up for a routine mortuary check to find his daughter Christina on the slab. Danny’s initial angst is quickly overcome by what must be a defense mechanism; his professionalism. He is convinced that Christina was murdered. But why? The opener sees Nesbitt lock the horns with Joely Richardson’s speedy pathologist Jackie. The following episodes present, one by one, an impressive cast which includes Anne-Marie Duff, Richard E Grant and Sacha Dhawan. Phil Harrison

Glastonbury: 50+

9 p.m., BBC 2

As Worthy Farm prepares for its first real festival since 2019, this freewheeling film travels through the history of Glasto to try and unlock what makes it so magical. What emerges from the clever mix of high-profile talking heads (including Stormzy, Thom Yorke and Florence Welch) and a goldmine of archival footage is a utopian alternative vision of the UK: one where the activism, equality and creativity thrive. Graeme Virtue

McDonalds & Dodds

8 p.m., TVI

Jason Watkins and Tala Gouveia’s dream team returns as mismatched detectives, stepping into even more hot water in Bath. Here they investigate the broad daylight death of a woman in a busy park. A possible lead leads to an anthropologist (Alan Davies) and his eccentric mother (Sian Phillips), living in a dilapidated mansion à la Gray Gardens… Ali Catterall

Tutankhamun: Secrets of the Tomb

8 p.m., Channel 4

This year marks a century since the treasure-filled tomb of King Tut was discovered in Egypt, and the legend of the ‘curse of the pharaoh’ still lingers on. Why did the people who entered the tomb meet mysterious endings? And what does their death have to do with another supposedly cursed shrine in Krakow, Poland? Paleoanthropologist Ella Al-Shamahi investigates. Ellen E. Jones

The Outlaws

9 p.m., BBC One

As overwhelmed drug dealers Christian and Rani recruit Bristol schoolboys as drug dealers, Stephen Merchant’s community service comedy begins to look like Bristol’s answer to the Wire. But after the stressful opening of the second series, even zingers can’t shake a growing sense of dread. GV

The cruise

9 p.m., Channel 5

Sheridan Smith narrates this new spectacle by following Virgin Voyages cruise ship staff and guests. It begins in Miami on an anxious day for the flagship Scarlet Lady. As the captain assesses the weather, host Ryan leads a “grog ride” of the fanciest bars on board. GV

Choice of movies

Philomene, 10:30 p.m., BBC One

Judi Dench and Steve Coogan in Philomene. Photography: BBC Films/Allstar

A devastating true story spawned this terrifyingly moving drama, starring Steve Coogan as co-writer and co-star. He plays former BBC journalist and spin doctor Martin Sixsmith, who escapes labor troubles by taking over the case of Philomena Lee (Judi Dench). Fifty years earlier, she was a single teenage mother stuck in the laundry of a Catholic convent in Ireland when her son was sold for adoption – against his will. She still hasn’t found him, so Martin agrees to join her search. The revelations that follow are expertly dripped by director Stephen Frears, as the two leads are a wonderful study in contrasts, debating faith, loss and forgiveness with a bit of pain but plenty of humor. . Simon Wardel

The Electric Life of Louis Wain, 12:05 p.m., 8 p.m., Sky Cinema Premiere

In his TV dramas Flowers and Landscapers, writer-director Will Sharpe has listened carefully to loners and eccentrics. His stylish and sometimes trippy new film adds another to the canon: the Edwardian illustrator known for his pictures of big-eyed anthropomorphic cats. Benedict Cumberbatch is sad and endearing as Louis, who keeps his mental health issues — and his extreme defense of felines — roughly in the realms of social acceptability, while supporting his mother, five sisters, and family. wife Emily (Claire Foy). SW

Moana, 4 p.m., BBC One

Moana.
Moana. Photography: Walt Disney Pictures/Allstar

Animation by Ron Clements and John Musker weaves the art, music and myths of Polynesia into an entertaining coming-of-age/eco-parable/origin story drama for the region’s sailors. Moana (Auli’i Cravalho), daughter of an island chief, is prohibited from exploring beyond the reef, but when she learns that the theft of a goddess’ heart stone of nature by the demigod Maui (Dwayne Johnson) results in a climate catastrophe, she sets sail to return it to its owner. A homage to Mad Max: Fury Road and a foolish rooster are just two highlights of this accomplished Disney movie. SW


The Seekers, 6:30 p.m., TCM Movies

As with Citizen Kane, just because John Ford’s 1956 western is still touted as one of the greatest movies of all time doesn’t mean it isn’t. It’s also John Wayne’s finest hour – he plays Ethan Edwards, a war-brutalized Confederate veteran who rediscovers his humanity and sense of community in his obsessive search for a niece kidnapped by Comanche raiders. Ford surrounds Ethan with vivid characters and epic Monument Valley landscapes in a film that’s deeper than he lets on. SW

Like father, like son, 1h30, Film4

The acute end to the nature versus nurture debate hits two families hard in Hirokazu Kore-eda’s poignant 2013 drama. Masaharu Fukuyama’s Ryota is an urban architect whose drive to succeed at work means he neglects his wife Midori (Machiko Ono ) and his young son Keita. Then they find out that Keita was switched at birth with Ryusei, eldest son of small town shopkeepers Yudai (Lily Franky) and Yukari (Yōko Maki). The difference between the easy-going, playful Yudai and the insistent, emotionally repressed Ryota is clear as the four parents negotiate their new reality – some more compassionate than others. SW

Live sports

One-Day International Cricket: Netherlands v England, 10:00am, Sky Sports Main Event The second ODI of the series at the VRA Cricket Ground in Amstelveen. The third day is Wednesday at 10 a.m.

F1 Canadian Grand Prix, 6:55 p.m., Sky Sports main event Round nine at Circuit Gilles-Villeneuve in Montreal.

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NYPD Detectives Union backs Scarcella in dismissed pivot case https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/nypd-detectives-union-backs-scarcella-in-dismissed-pivot-case/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 17:51:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/nypd-detectives-union-backs-scarcella-in-dismissed-pivot-case/ The city’s detective union has vouched for the work of the disgraced former NYPD detective. Louis Scarcella on Friday, blasting the overturning of a murder conviction against a notorious 1980s crack dealer due to the cop’s tactics. Detectives’ Endowment Association President Paul DiGiacomo sent a letter Friday to Brooklyn District Attorney Eric Gonzalez calling on […]]]>

The city’s detective union has vouched for the work of the disgraced former NYPD detective. Louis Scarcella on Friday, blasting the overturning of a murder conviction against a notorious 1980s crack dealer due to the cop’s tactics.

Detectives’ Endowment Association President Paul DiGiacomo sent a letter Friday to Brooklyn District Attorney Eric Gonzalez calling on the prosecutor to appeal Judge Vincent Del Giudice’s Wednesday decision to overturn Sam’s conviction. “Baby Sam” Edmonson, whose drug-dealing crew filled the streets with millions of crack cocaine in the mid-1980s.

Scarcella was accused by a recanting witness of concocting testimony that the witness was at the scene of a murder Edmonson allegedly ordered his own drug-dealing partner, Kenneth Rankin, in 1987 The judge believed the witness – and also said Scarcella’s testimony at a hearing last year was “incredible”.

Edmonson was convicted in 1990 along with two senior associates of murdering Rankin, along with another member of the organization, Willie Maye, in 1988. He was serving a 75-year sentence in the case until Wednesday’s decision .

“The DEA supports the work of Det. Louis Scarcella,” the union said in the letter. “This ridiculous attempt to smear the names and reputations of our members and exonerate the horribly guilty is particularly troubling at this difficult time in our city’s history.

“We implore you to immediately appeal the recent decision … overturning the 1990 murder conviction,” DiGacomo wrote to Gonzalez.

The notorious crack dealer is still charged in that indictment, though it’s unclear whether the Brooklyn prosecutor will appeal the judge’s ruling, try the case again or let Edmonson go free.

The conviction, which relied on dozens of trial witnesses who detailed how the drug organization operated, fell apart after a key eyewitness to Rankin’s murder, Keith Christmas, recanted , claiming that Scarcella and his partner, Detective William Morris, urged him to catch up. testimony. Christmas now claims he was not present at the murder, contradicting his testimony at trial. Christmas says Scarcella and her partner fed him meals and even took him to two women’s homes for sex as they concocted the false story of Rankin’s murder.

Since 2013, more than a dozen cases Scarcella has worked on have been thrown out by Brooklyn judges, resulting in tens of millions in payouts in lawsuits against people wrongfully convicted by the city.

A spokesperson for the Brooklyn district attorney’s office said they are still reviewing Del Giudice’s decision.

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Murder and Justice in Wine Country: Retired Judge Ray Guadagni Releases “Napa Valley Case Files” | Books https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/murder-and-justice-in-wine-country-retired-judge-ray-guadagni-releases-napa-valley-case-files-books/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/murder-and-justice-in-wine-country-retired-judge-ray-guadagni-releases-napa-valley-case-files-books/ From the 1850 massacre of the Wappo people in Napa County to the 2000 trial of a man whose reckless and furious conduct killed two New Zealand visitors, retired Napa Judge Raymond A. Guadagni examines eight murder stories locals in his latest book, “Napa Valley Case Files: Justice in Wine Country” from History Press. A […]]]>

From the 1850 massacre of the Wappo people in Napa County to the 2000 trial of a man whose reckless and furious conduct killed two New Zealand visitors, retired Napa Judge Raymond A. Guadagni examines eight murder stories locals in his latest book, “Napa Valley Case Files: Justice in Wine Country” from History Press.

A young man convicted of bludgeoning his parents to death with a baseball bat; a college student whose disappearance and death led to the arrest and trial of one of Napa County’s few black residents; a woman who shot her abusive husband; a homosexual priest leading a secret life; an 84-year-old man who “loved his wife to death”; and a man who got away with murder, for nine years – Guadagni recounts the events and ensuing investigations and trials in meticulous and fascinating detail.

It’s a style he established in his previous book, “The Napa Murder of Anita Fagiani Andrews: A Cold Case That Caught a Serial Killer,” which chronicles how a murderer was ultimately convicted 37 years after stabbing the woman. Napa to death. in 1974.

People also read…

Guadagni was the presiding judge in the trial of Roy Melanson, who was serving another sentence in Colorado and was identified by DNA methods not available in the 1970s. His in-depth and gripping account brought the bench perspective to a story that had haunted Napa law enforcement offices — and the wider community — for decades.

Guadagni brings this same global point of view to the stories he tells in “Case Files”, each of which provides a reflection of the time in which they occurred.

It begins with “The Napa County Indian Massacre”, subtitled “The First Case Heard in the Supreme Court of California”.

People v Smith et al was a native of Napa County, and when he stood trial in 1851, one of the witnesses called was George Yount, who testified about the group of Lake County men who arrived at his ranch determined to get unleash with fire, murder and terror.

That the men were arrested and tried in these “uncertain and chaotic times” was a surprise, “given the prevailing attitudes of the people of that time”, writes Guadagni, noting: “In 1851, California passed a law compensating the groups for expenses incurred on Indians. – hunting trips.

Guadagni said he chose cases he could research in depth to recreate for readers, but this one was a challenge, given the scarcity of documentation from that era. Nonetheless, due to its significance as the first case heard by the fledgling Supreme Court in a new state, he decided it was worth seeking out.

A troubling question of race arises in its second story, the case of Lynda Kanes, a student at Pacific Union College in Angwin, who disappeared on her way to work in 1971.

A week later his body was found, buried on Howell Mountain, and circumstantial evidence led to the arrest of Walter Williams, “Willie the Lumberjack” who, Guadagni writes, “had lived in the community since 1949, was amiable, popular and healthy”. -loved and so useful as a carrier/handyman for everyone.”

Williams was also one of the few black men living in Napa County, which led to issues of racial bias and the decision to close Williams’ preliminary hearing and seal the hearing transcripts.

All of this, plus the timing of the murder, when the Zodiac serial murders included two PUC students, sparked intense public and media interest in the trial, Guidagni said.

Retired judge Raymond Guadagni has released an account of the 1974 murder of Anita Fagiani Andrews in Napa, the 37-year-old effort to find her killer, and her 2011 trial in which Guadagni was a judge.

In this story as in others, Guadagni does what few TV detective series can: he takes readers behind the scenes to witness the myriad decisions that go into investigations, arrests and trials, making these stories of “wine country justice,” filled with familiar names from Napa’s history, absorbing reads that illuminate a dark side of the valley.

The detectives’ methods are particularly fascinating in the case he calls “Lying in Wait,” in which William “Billy” Duvall Jr. called the police to report that his parents’ home had been ransacked and they were dead.

It is apparent from Guadagni’s description of the painstaking manner in which the police gathered evidence that Duvall was someone interested in the double murders – obvious, it seems, to everyone except Duvall, who had devised an alibi designed to deflect suspicion.

While fiction usually ends with the inspired capture of a criminal by detectives, Guadagni takes the reader deeper into the cases, through the trial and its aftermath, and offers an insider’s view of the methods, obstacles and the decisions that legal teams and judges have to make. . The result is both realistic and thoughtful, a compelling page-turner.

Guadagni, a Napa native, studied at UC Berkeley and UC Hastings College of Law before returning to his hometown in 1975. His law firm became a contract public defender in 1978, and in 1995, he was appointed Commissioner of the Superior Court.

He became a Napa Superior Court judge in 2000 after the retirement of Judge Philip Champlin, who wrote the preview of “Napa Valley Case Files.” Champlin was also the presiding judge in one of the most difficult cases described by Guadagni, that of Bob Edwards, who at 84 killed his beloved wife of 56 years. She had suffered strokes, was not recovering from them and was immobilized in a bed because she kept withdrawing her IV drips. He had promised her that he would never let her be sent to a care facility. After suffocating her, he called the police to report her death.

Was he guilty of murder? Guadagni walks readers through the steps the police and lawyers took in deciding whether to present the evidence to Judge Champlain, rather than presenting it to a trial jury.

“It was very unusual,” Guadagni said. “Literators rarely want to leave (a case) to a judge alone.” It only takes one dissident jurist to result in a suspended trial followed by a new trial, he explained.

“But in this case,” Guadagni said, “they had to be convinced that Judge Champlin would make a compassionate and humane decision. And he did.”

Champlin, in turn, describes Guadagni as “the forensic historian of the Napa course”.

Guadagni will discuss “Napa Valley Case Files” at an event with Napa Bookmine at the Napa Main Library on July 5, beginning at 6 p.m. Register on Eventbrite (https://www.eventbrite.com/e/napa-valley-case-dossiers-justice-au-pays-du-vin-avec-raymond-guadagni-tickets-315036441477). The event is for 60 people in person. If more than 60 registered, a Zoom link will be added.

Guadagni said his next project is a story he had planned to include in “Napa Valley Case Files” but, on the publisher’s recommendation, is turning into a separate book. It’s a 1980s Ponzi scheme called LandVest that defrauded many Napa Valley residents.

“There are people today who are still feeling the effects,” he said.

Gaudagni said he welcomes comments from victims, witnesses or anyone who might “want to set the record straight”. Comments can be sent to spaulsen@napanews.com for forwarding.

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We own this town tackle the problems The wire is barely touched https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/we-own-this-town-tackle-the-problems-the-wire-is-barely-touched/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 00:45:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/we-own-this-town-tackle-the-problems-the-wire-is-barely-touched/ We Own This City and The Wire are both David Simon series, but HBO’s new crime drama focuses on police corruption like its predecessor never did. We own this town invites comparison Thread for countless reasons, and it’s impossible to watch the first without thinking about the second. Both HBO series focus on systemic issues […]]]>

We Own This City and The Wire are both David Simon series, but HBO’s new crime drama focuses on police corruption like its predecessor never did.

We own this town invites comparison Thread for countless reasons, and it’s impossible to watch the first without thinking about the second. Both HBO series focus on systemic issues within Baltimore’s criminal justice system. Both are products of designer David Simon. Both take such a complex approach to their subject matter. The We own this town The trailer even has a similar tone, so it’s only natural to consider the shows together.

But there is one point on which the two series are just as clearly opposed. Where Thread offered deep insight into the entire ecosystem that created Baltimore’s problems, We own this town focuses specifically on issues of police corruption and brutality. He focuses on the issue in a way that Thread has never done so, as it only focuses on one unit rather than the entire police force or the entire community.

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Thread has earned a reputation over the years as one of the greatest television series in history because it stands apart from mass media crime dramas like the Law and order franchise. With a cast of characters drawn from every level of Baltimore’s infrastructure, the story centered its crime drama in a complex web of interactions. Rather than a black-and-white tale of cops and robbers, viewers immersed themselves in the lives of stevedores, lawyers, detectives, commissioners, mayors and countless others who have permeated the story of realism.


We own this town takes that same realism and uses it with a narrower focus. Instead of also fleshing out the criminals and the police as separate entities, We own this town merges them to focus on one central question: what happens when the cops are the criminals? Based on the book of the same name by Justin Fenton from Baltimore Sun, the miniseries follows rampant corruption within the city’s gun trail task force. Tracing the task force’s corruption and explaining the environment in which it spread, the show maintains Thread’s commitments of realism and complexity while following a problem much more methodically.


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Thread was no stranger to the problem of police corruption, but even over the course of five seasons he didn’t delve into the problem as specifically as We own this town. Corruption issues Thread addressed were wide-ranging and manifold, ranging from elected officials making deals and greasing their hands for a campaign, to jurisdictional challenges that have turned the police into a bureaucratic bramble bush. There was also sheer incompetence on the part of beat cops and superiors.

But We own this town treats the Gun Trace Task Force as an isolated representative of the police in the United States. The immensity of its corruption or how its members have come to justify their actions slowly rears its head as the miniseries builds its momentum for maximum effect. And yet, from its earliest days, it shows incredible power and efficiency when it not only looks at the full picture of a city, but examines it under a microscope.


We Own This City is streaming now on HBO Max.

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Social media shooting threats against elite schools are spreading fear https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/social-media-shooting-threats-against-elite-schools-are-spreading-fear/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 15:20:15 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/social-media-shooting-threats-against-elite-schools-are-spreading-fear/ A 14-year-old freshman at Murrow High School in Brooklyn was sitting in history class one morning in April when she received a series of chilling texts from a friend. A threat to shoot the school had been posted on the chat site Omegle – and it included a list of around a dozen students who […]]]>

A 14-year-old freshman at Murrow High School in Brooklyn was sitting in history class one morning in April when she received a series of chilling texts from a friend. A threat to shoot the school had been posted on the chat site Omegle – and it included a list of around a dozen students who would be killed. One of them was the 14 year old girl.

“Seeing your child’s name on a literal list was really the most completely devastating thing,” said Jessica Heyman, the girl’s mother.

But the girl, whose name is not disclosed, knew immediately that the threat was a hoax: a few days earlier, another threat had targeted students from another New York high school, the Clinton School, in using precisely the same language.

The incidents in Murrow and Clinton were two in a series of nearly identical prank threats targeting more than a dozen New York City schools over the past four months, and at least nine other schools nationwide, including those in Long Beach, Calif., and Hicksville, NY, on Long Island, according to parents, students and two senior law enforcement officials.

Schools in New York include many of the city’s most prestigious public and private schools, including Brooklyn Friends School, Brooklyn Technical High School, and Berkeley Carroll School in Brooklyn, as well as Beacon High School, LaGuardia High School and the United Nations International School in Manhattan. . Just this week, police said a threat was made against New Utrecht High School in Brooklyn.

John Miller, assistant commissioner of the police department’s intelligence division, said the department is investigating seven of those threats in New York and is coordinating with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, which investigates threats nationwide.

“These are not credible threats,” Miller said. “They are meant to cause disruption.”

Authorities believe the threats are being made by someone – possibly overseas, Mr Miller said – who finds the names of students at a school by searching Instagram for children with public accounts using skills rudimentary in social media. Often they pose as a student at the school they are threatening, Miller added.

The threat actor is targeting high-profile schools for attention but does not appear to have any intention of following through, according to a senior law enforcement official, who spoke anonymously because he was not allowed to discuss threats.

“We take every security incident seriously to ensure the continued safety of our students and staff and are working closely with the NYPD on their investigation of these threats,” said Jenna Lyle, spokesperson for the ministry. education.

For decades, American schools have had to deal with false fire alarms, bomb threats and threats to carry out school shootings. But these hoaxes reflect a disconcerting new reality for a country already reeling from an epidemic of mass violence: Social media has made it increasingly easy to create eerily specific threats of violence that obstruct one of the few ways available to the police to control them.

“If the system is overwhelmed with false alarms, some might go through,” said Ron Avi Astor, a social welfare professor who studies school violence at the University of California, Los Angeles. “It takes away a big tool.”

The site where the hoax threats were made, Omegle, was also occasionally used by the shooter who killed 21 people at an elementary school in Uvalde, Texas. Hoax threats posted on Omegle about New York schools mentioned the type of assault rifle that would be used in a shoot and the music that would play: Abba.

The prevalence of school shooting threats — and a slight increase following a particularly notorious or deadly mass shooting — is not uncommon. For most of this school year, the city averaged about two school shooting threats a day, the top law enforcement official said. In the week following the Uvalde shooting, the number soared to around six a day.

“Only a small percentage of these threats are serious. Others will make threats as a prank or in an effort to be disruptive, much like previous generations who would sound a fire alarm or make a prank phone call,” said Dewey G. Cornell, professor of psychology at the University. from Virginia who studies youth and violence. “The stakes are higher now with social media and the huge anxiety generated by the threat of a school shooting.”

Despite the hoax threats, targeted school shootings are rarer in big city schools. A 2020 federal report found that while urban schools had more shootings overall, those shootings typically stemmed from conflict and occurred outside of the school building.

Department of Education spokeswoman Ms Lyle said school officials at each school are trained in emergency response protocols and that “following a threat, schools typically introduce additional security measures, including scanning and deploying additional NYPD School Security Officers.”

After the hoax directed at Berkeley Carroll, a private school in Park Slope, Brooklyn, circulated in early February, the school tightened security and allowed students to attend remotely for several days. But he did not close or lock down the school, telling parents he was following police recommendations.

A disturbing feature of the threats is that they also name the student who is supposed to carry out the attack. Weeks before the Murrow High School threat, Chelsea Altman was awakened at her Brooklyn home by a call from a detective in Long Beach, California.

His 14-year-old son, the detective told him, was named as the person who would shoot a school there. She woke up her son. It turns out he already knew he had been falsely identified as a potential threat – but not at this school. He had learned the day before that he was named as the potential aggressor in the threat against the Clinton school in Manhattan.

“It took me a few minutes to unpack what really happened and realize there is someone doing this to scare everyone,” Ms Altman said.

Long Beach police said the threat, made against Wilson High School on March 30, was similar to threats made against high schools in New York City and that detectives “determined there was no credible threat.” .

A month after the Clinton school threat, a friend of Ms. Altman’s son was named as the potential attacker in a mass shooting threat against LaGuardia High School of Music & Art and Performing Arts. The list of supposed victims included several of his friends. “They added all my mutual friends from Instagram and added them as names,” the 15-year-old said.

In the days that followed, he received hundreds of hate messages, including threats, from people who had seen the LaGuardia threat and assumed it was real.

“Nowadays there is no threat of ‘hoaxing’ or pranks because the fear and the stress and trauma that goes with it is very real,” said Justin Brannan, the city councilor who represents the city. district which includes New Utrecht. He compared the similarly worded threats to the childhood game “Mad Libs”.

Omegle, which allows people to video chat with strangers, claims to have several million daily users. After the Uvalde massacre, a 17-year-old girl came forward to say she had disturbing interactions on Omegle with the shooter, who showed her a gun, with blood visible on the floor, and claimed he was bleeding from the nose.

Threats made against Omegle against schools in New York and elsewhere follow a pattern, the top law enforcement official said: the person blocks their video feed, types the threat, then leaves the chat. Threats come to the attention of authorities after people who have seen them capture and share them.

The law enforcement official said authorities in New York had subpoenaed and received chat records from Omegle, including the IP addresses of people posting the threats, but they were constantly in dead ends, in part due to the encryption software used by the threat creator.

An Omegle spokesperson said the company “takes threats made by users on the platform very seriously” and “works closely with law enforcement investigating threats made by users.” on Omegle”.

For those who study school violence, the series of mass shooting warnings is just another chapter in a long history of false threats. The strategies change, they say, but the intent – to sow chaos and disruption – remains the same.

“We see it in the ebbs and flows,” Mr. Astor said. “It’s been a very long time since anyone called me about a false fire alarm.”

Téa Kvetenadze contributed reporting.

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Raleigh, France HR, M’s win 1st series in Houston since 2018 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/raleigh-france-hr-ms-win-1st-series-in-houston-since-2018/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 02:12:30 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/raleigh-france-hr-ms-win-1st-series-in-houston-since-2018/ HOUSTON (AP) — Cal Raleigh and Ty France both homered early and the Seattle Mariners beat the Astros 6-3 on Wednesday night to finally win a series in Houston. The Mariners took two of three from AL rival West Astros to win their fourth straight series overall and the first in Houston since September 2018. […]]]>

HOUSTON (AP) — Cal Raleigh and Ty France both homered early and the Seattle Mariners beat the Astros 6-3 on Wednesday night to finally win a series in Houston.

The Mariners took two of three from AL rival West Astros to win their fourth straight series overall and the first in Houston since September 2018.

Seattle has struggled at Minute Maid Park in recent years. The Mariners have won more games in this set than Houston in the 2019 and 2020 seasons combined when they were a meager 1-16.

The Mariners trailed by two with a goal and one out in the fourth when Raleigh homered for the second time in this series, a shot to right center by Jose Urquidy (5-3) to tie it at 3.


France connected with two outs in the inning for a solo practice that put Seattle ahead.

Logan Gilbert (6-2) allowed seven hits and three runs in six innings to win his second straight decision. He gave up all three early before settling to throw three scoreless frames. Diego Castillo hit the team in the ninth for his fourth save.

Urquidy had seven hits and five runs — four earned — while going a career-high four in 4 1/3 innings.

Yordan Alvarez had three hits and two RBIs for the Astros, who also dropped a streak against the Mariners last week in Seattle.

The Mariners got a brace from JP Crawford to start the fifth and he moved to third after a single from Eugenio Suarez and an error from shortstop Aledmys Díaz. A sacrificial fly from Adam Frazier chased Urquidy away.

Seattle rookie Julio Rodríguez was hit in the left arm on consecutive at-bats in the sixth and eighth innings. He took first base without incident both times, a stark contrast to the events of Monday night’s game when the benches cleared and multiple ejections came after France were pushed back by Héctor Neris.

Jesse Winker completed the lead with a single in the eighth.

Alvarez set up Houston early with an RBI single with two outs in the first.

Urquidy outed Winker with one out in the second and he advanced to second on a wild pitch by Urquidy with two outs. Rodríguez walked before Seattle tied it at 1 on a Crawford single.

Jose Altuve opened the second Houston with a double on a left-field practice line. Alex Bregman singled with one out and Altuve was ejected at the plate.

A brace from Alvarez drove Bregman in and put the Astros up 2-1. Kyle Tucker then scored another home run.

TRAINER’S ROOM

Mariners: OF Kyle Lewis, who has been out since suffering a concussion on May 28, still has symptoms and has yet to return to baseball activities. … RF Mitch Haniger (sprained right ankle) doesn’t run yet but hits the cage. There is no timetable for his return.

NEXT

Mariners: Seattle has a day off Thursday before hosting the Boston Red Sox on Friday night in Game 1 of 11 at home.

Astros: Houston also sits out Thursday before opening a three-game interleague series with Miami on Friday night.

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More AP MLB: https://apnews.com/hub/mlb and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports

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No charges for police officer in connection with Parkville shooting https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/no-charges-for-police-officer-in-connection-with-parkville-shooting/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 01:11:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/no-charges-for-police-officer-in-connection-with-parkville-shooting/ A Maryland National Capital Police officer from the Montgomery County Division will not be charged in a shooting in Parkville in May. Baltimore County Police Officer Adnan Hussain said. Police said on May 5 that Hussain was trying to buy a PlayStation 5 in the 1100 block of Deanwood Road. The sale was organized via […]]]>

A Maryland National Capital Police officer from the Montgomery County Division will not be charged in a shooting in Parkville in May. Baltimore County Police Officer Adnan Hussain said. Police said on May 5 that Hussain was trying to buy a PlayStation 5 in the 1100 block of Deanwood Road. The sale was organized via Facebook Marketplace. He was off duty at the time of the shooting. A few days earlier, police said they were made aware of a separate armed robbery which also originated from Facebook Marketplace on Deanwood Road. The victim in the case said he was robbed while trying to sell three pairs of tennis shoes, police said. and face robbery and weapons charges, police said.

A Maryland National Capital Police officer from the Montgomery County Division will not be charged in a shooting in Parkville in May.

Previous video above: Investigation underway into Parkville shooting involving off-duty park cop

A grand jury declined to press charges against Officer Adnan Hussain, Baltimore County Police said.

Police said on May 5 that Hussain was trying to buy a PlayStation 5 in the 1100 block of Deanwood Road. The sale was set up via Facebook Marketplace.

Police said Hussain reported shooting two suspects after the $440 he used to buy the game console was stolen. He was off duty at the time of the shooting.

A few days earlier, police said they were made aware of a separate armed robbery which also originated from Facebook Marketplace on Deanwood Road. The victim in the case said he was robbed while trying to sell three pairs of tennis shoes, police said.

Police said that while detectives were investigating the case, the non-fatal shooting involving Hussain occurred.

At present, three suspects have been identified and face theft and weapons charges, police said.

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