History Detectives – Hamline Midway History http://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 05:02:45 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/hamline-midway-history-icon-150x150.jpg History Detectives – Hamline Midway History http://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/ 32 32 Susie Mowbray cleared of the murder of her husband Bill https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/susie-mowbray-cleared-of-the-murder-of-her-husband-bill/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 00:00:14 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/susie-mowbray-cleared-of-the-murder-of-her-husband-bill/ Brownsville, Texas is known as a peaceful place. But on the night of September 16, 1987, the serenity was shattered by the explosion of a gun and the call to 911 from a prominent resident. Susie Mowbray has appealed for help to report that her husband, Bill Mowbray, a respected Cadillac dealer, had committed suicide. […]]]>

Brownsville, Texas is known as a peaceful place. But on the night of September 16, 1987, the serenity was shattered by the explosion of a gun and the call to 911 from a prominent resident.

Susie Mowbray has appealed for help to report that her husband, Bill Mowbray, a respected Cadillac dealer, had committed suicide.

Upon arrival, paramedics found Bill in bed and a bloody scene. He had been shot in the head. The weapon lay in blood beside him.

“It was a very, very powerful handgun, and there were splatter marks on the ceiling and on the ceiling fan,” said former assistant Bill Hagen. District Atty., Cameron County, said “Accident, suicide or murder” broadcast on Oxygen. “Mr. Mowbray, although fatally injured, was still alive and still breathing.”

Despite efforts to save him, Bill was pronounced dead in hospital.

Investigators built a portrait of the Mowbray, who had married and had children before getting married.

“Susie gave the impression that Bill had always had emotional issues, mental issues, issues that never got resolved,” said Cary Zayas, former KRGV-TV reporter.

“Bill loved spending money, there was no doubt about it,” Susie’s friend Sarah Bush told producers. His expenses may have exceeded his income.

Close associates and others in Brownsville were aware of at least one previous suicide attempt by Bill, sources told the producers. Investigators’ initial view of Bill’s death was that it was suicide.

In light of this, Hagen said, “the crime scene was not properly secured.” Susie was allowed to stay in the house.

Investigators returned the day after the shooting to collect evidence. Bill’s daughter was also present. They discovered that Susie and her friends had covered up the evidence, presumably to erase the signs of the tragedy.

While the play was not banned, Susie’s actions prompted investigators to dig deeper. Bill had a sore back, so the couple slept with “a wall” of pillows between them to help solve their problem. After hearing the gunshot, Susie ran to call Bill’s assistant. He asked her to immediately call the police. Why hadn’t she called 911 first?

Authorities also questioned whether Susie’s account of how her husband got off was counted. Susie’s sheets, pillows and nightgown were collected for analysis.

While awaiting the results of the crime lab, Dr. Lawrence Dahm performed an autopsy and came out convinced the death was not suicide. Bill’s death was considered a homicide. Susie was the main suspect.

Detectives investigated the Mowbray marriage. They found out that Bill was having various affairs and that Susie knew about it. Her infidelities had prompted Susie to move with her children to Austin. Susie eventually returned to Brownsville. By one count, Bill begged his wife to come back. In another version, the couple had indeed mentioned divorce and the division of property.

“Bill had a life insurance policy, and a few months before his death she had, for the first time, looked at life insurance policies to see what the amounts were and who the beneficiary was,” Hagen said. .

Susie was the beneficiary of the over a million dollar policy. Susie had been informed that Bill was going to change the beneficiary to be his daughter, but he died before he could.

The revelation that Susie had inquired about the insurance payment and the autopsy results suggested to investigators that they were pursuing a murder. The motive: money.

On November 3, 1987, seven weeks after Bill’s death, Texas blood spatter expert Sgt. Dusty Hesskew, has completed his analysis of Susie’s nightgown and reported his findings. Luminol analysis of the nightgown showed tiny spots of what was believed to be blood.

Investigators concluded that Susie was riding Bill and shot him, which may have explained the evidence of blood spatter and the evidence on his nightgown. Susie was arrested for the death of her husband.

Susie’s children were in shock. Bill’s family believed in the detectives’ theory of their father’s death, according to “Accident, Suicide or Murder.”

Susie’s trial began six months after her indictment. Hesskew’s findings were central to the prosecution’s case. The Mowbray’s bloodstained mattress was presented in court for the jury to see.

Defense attorneys, meanwhile, pointed to Bill’s story of emotional issues and previous suicide threats.

On June 9, 1988, Susie was convicted. She was sentenced to life in prison without parole.

For eight years, Susie lived behind bars. Her son, Wade, enrolled in law school in the hope of proving his innocence, reported the Los Angeles Times in 1996.

He was struck by evidence regarding his mother’s nightgown. Except for what the blood expert found using Luminol, the white robe was immaculate – not a drop of blood anywhere.

It was revealed that another blood spatter expert had analyzed the evidence and could not confirm that the material on Susie’s nightgown was in fact blood.

“From a legal point of view, I think you might consider this a miscarriage of justice,” defense lawyer Eduardo R. Rodriguez told “Accident, suicide or murder”.

Susie “won a new trial in 1996 after an appeals court ruled prosecutors suppressed a blood expert report contradicting the homicide theory,” the Associated Press reported in 1998.

Susie’s second trial began in January 1998, a decade after Bill’s death.

The defense team focused on Bill’s suicidal tendencies and dire financial situation and the fact that the splatter on Susie’s nightgown was not actually confirmed to be blood. Hesskew conceded that his initial testimony at trial was scientifically invalid.

Prosecutors argued that Susie shot Bill from behind the pillow bar, which was why his nightgown was free of visible blood. And there was the heavy lifting of the insurance payment.

And during the defense team’s argument, Hagen said, there was a dramatic explosion. Susie Mowbray, then 49, shouted in court: “I didn’t!

On January 23, 1998, the jury returned with their verdict. Susie was acquitted of all charges.

The outcome of the trial has left a family divided – and questions lingering.

“There is only one person who knows what happened to Bill Mowbray,” lawyer and crime writer Manning Wolfe told producers. “And that’s Susie Mowbray.”

To learn more about the case, watch “Accident, suicide or murder” broadcast on Oxygen, or streaming episodes here.


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A bitter new trial in the murder of Susi Larsen: chronicle of Steve Duin https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/a-bitter-new-trial-in-the-murder-of-susi-larsen-chronicle-of-steve-duin/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 14:08:25 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/a-bitter-new-trial-in-the-murder-of-susi-larsen-chronicle-of-steve-duin/ On the first Saturday in September, Mindy and Craig Bush held a wedding ceremony in the expansive backyard of their Aloha home. Mindy’s son, Tim Traut, and his wife had run away three years ago, and after two COVID-19 winters, it was finally time to celebrate the union with their vaccinated friends. The family has […]]]>

On the first Saturday in September, Mindy and Craig Bush held a wedding ceremony in the expansive backyard of their Aloha home. Mindy’s son, Tim Traut, and his wife had run away three years ago, and after two COVID-19 winters, it was finally time to celebrate the union with their vaccinated friends.

The family has set up a long table in the courtyard. On a tablecloth hand crocheted by the bride’s grandmother, Mindy placed photographs of loved ones who were not there.

A range of grandparents. Tim’s father, Mike, struck and killed by a New York subway train.

And, pictured in a field of tulips, Susi Larsen, Mindy’s younger sister, who was brutally raped and murdered 25 years ago, and buried on what would have been her wedding day in 1996.

Even as she was preparing for the Labor Day weekend celebration, Mindy was preparing to testify at the late August retrial of Billy Lee Oatney Jr., who was convicted of the murder of Susi in 1998 and passed away. 17 years on death row in Oregon.

In 2015, the Oregon Court of Appeal ordered a new trial in what may be the most sloppy and confrontational capital case in the history of the state. Mindy was subpoenaed to testify about Susi and the floating gold heart pendant she gave her sister in 1979.

Police found a floating heart of gold and Susi’s blood in Tigard’s apartment in Oatney a month after the murder.

Susi Larsen in 1994, wearing the floating heart pendant in gold

But a July 29 ruling by Washington County Judge Beth Roberts significantly limited the testimony she would allow to Willford Nathaniel Johnston, the co-accused in the aggravated murder case.

Johnston said in the 1998 trial that he and Oatney tied up and raped Larsen before Oatney wrapped a plastic bag around his head. Johnston is serving a life sentence without the possibility of parole.

Roberts has ruled that if Oatney tries to attribute the murder to Johnston at the retrial, the state can call Johnston as a witness. But if Oatney’s defense attorney Rich Wolf only suggests in his introduction that Johnston committed the crime, that won’t open the door for prosecutors to put Johnston on the stand.

Oregon Attorney General Ellen Rosenblum appealed Roberts’ decision to the Oregon Supreme Court. High Court deliberations could delay Oatney’s retrial by months.

“We all know there is a very good possibility that he will get away with it, because a lot of the evidence is suppressed,” said Mindy Bush. “My very first instinct is fear. Because I got up during the sentencing phase and told him to his face that he could rot in hell.

Two weeks after Larsen went missing in August 1996, his naked, decomposed body was found trapped under a log in Champoeg State Park.

Oatney quickly became a suspect because Larsen told friends she was going to see him about the earrings he had offered to make for her wedding. When Johnston was arrested on a parole violation charge, Tualatin Police were informed by roommates’ phone conversations from prison that Oatney may have been involved in Larsen’s disappearance.

But neither of the two roommates said all that until October 23, 1996, when Scott Upham, the Washington County District Attorney, interviewed Oatney and casually offered him immunity. “Anything you say in this interview… (and) any information we get from what you tell us,” Upham promised, “can never be used against you.”

This offer was never put in writing. Upham did not note, as usual, that the offer of immunity would be invalidated if Oatney did not tell the whole truth.

Oatney insisted that Johnston single-handedly killed Larsen after Oatney left his apartment to drink and shoot pool at the Wichita pub in Tualatin.

A bitter new trial in the murder of Susi Larsen: chronicle of Steve Duin

Billy Lee Oatney maintained his innocence in a 2006 letter to former Register Guard reporter Mark Baker

When detectives played the recording of this conversation to Johnston, according to court records, “Johnston’s face turned beet red, and he clenched and clenched his fists.” Over the next two days, he set the record straight, telling the story that secured him a true life sentence and put Oatney on death row.

The new trial? I am only surprised that it took 17 years for the Court of Appeal to find fault in Oatney’s conviction. Judge Timothy Sercombe argued, convincingly, that because Johnston’s angry rebuttal was a direct result of Oatney’s immune statements, Johnston’s testimony should not have been allowed in the 1998 trial.

Rosenblum’s office and Bracken McKey, the Washington County Assistant District Attorney, have no arguments with this. As McKey told Roberts in a July 27 hearing, he knows he can’t use Johnston’s tainted testimony in Oatney’s new trial.

But McKey added that he could call Johnston as a witness in 2021 if “the defense opens the door to that by trying to push this (murder) on Willford Johnston … If that makes him say,” I want to tell you what really happened ”, he should have the ability to do so. It does not violate the decision of the Court of Appeal and it does not violate the 1996 immunity agreement. “

“Of course it does,” Roberts replied.

Until the Supreme Court rules, Mindy Bush will have to deal with fear, exhaustion and emotions that she finds it hard to define. “Anger is definitely a part of it,” she says, “but that’s not what drives me. I don’t know what the word is. Frustration? Sadness?

“Sadness is the greatest. Not having my sister in my life. This photo? Susi in the tulip fields? It was so much her.

–Steve Duin

stephen.b.duin@gmail.com


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Lumberton site offers monoclonal antibody therapy for COVID-19 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/lumberton-site-offers-monoclonal-antibody-therapy-for-covid-19/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 23:12:21 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/lumberton-site-offers-monoclonal-antibody-therapy-for-covid-19/ RALEIGH – Lumberton is one of four new sites in North Carolina where people can receive free treatment for COVID-19, the state’s main health agency said on Friday. All four sites, which opened on Friday, offer monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), and treatment will be managed by local organizations in partnership with the Federal Emergency Management Agency. […]]]>

RALEIGH – Lumberton is one of four new sites in North Carolina where people can receive free treatment for COVID-19, the state’s main health agency said on Friday.

All four sites, which opened on Friday, offer monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), and treatment will be managed by local organizations in partnership with the Federal Emergency Management Agency. With the new sites, there are now more than 200 sites in North Carolina offering the treatment that can reduce the likelihood of hospitalization from COVID-19 if caught early.

The Lumberton site is located at Southeastern Health Park, located at 4901 Dawn Drive. Referrals from a primary health care provider based on a positive COVID-19 test are required for this location.

“Although vaccines offer the best protection against COVID-19, treatment options such as monoclonal antibodies are available for people at high risk of serious illness if you have had symptoms of COVID-19 for 10 days or less or if you have been exposed to COVID-19. “said Dr Elizabeth Tilson, NCDHHS State Health Director and Chief Medical Officer.” Expanding access to this potentially life-saving treatment can, if taken early, reduce the risk of serious illness, hospitalization and death. ”

Below are the other three new sites and information on how people can make appointments, which are needed:

– Wilkes County: The North Wilkesboro Health Foundation. Call 336-528-1637.

– Johnston County: Smithfield Hospital campus in Smithfield. Call 919-268-1621.

– Harnett County: Harnett Health Sciences Center at Central Carolina Community College in Lillington. Call 910-893-0653.

The state health agency, local partners and FEMA selected the new locations based on a combination of geographic gaps in access to treatment and the regional number of COVID-19 cases. Appointments are required, but patients eligible for treatment do not need to be referred by a health care provider to sites other than Lumberton if they meet medical screening criteria when taking appointment. Identification is not required to receive treatment at FEMA supported sites.

The federal government provides free monoclonal antibody therapy to patients, according to the NCDHHS. However, healthcare providers may charge an administration fee for the treatment. Medicare and many commercial insurance companies cover all costs for patients.

People who believe they are eligible for treatment should ask their health care provider for information about monoclonal antibodies or call the Combat COVID Monoclonal Antibodies call center at 1-877-332-6585 (English) or 1- 877-366-0310 (Spanish). The call center can help people who do not have a health care provider. More information, including answers to frequently asked questions about monoclonal antibody treatments, is available at covid19.ncdhhs.gov/treatment.

Monoclonal antibodies are proteins made in the lab to fight infections – in this case, the virus that causes COVID-19 – and are given to patients directly with an IV drip or injection. Some early evidence suggests that this treatment may reduce the amount of virus, or viral load, that causes COVID-19 in a person’s body. A lower viral load can reduce the severity of symptoms and the likelihood of hospitalization.

According to the NCDHHS, vaccination remains the best protection against serious illness, hospitalization and death from COVID-19. All unvaccinated North Carolinians aged 12 and over should receive a COVID-19 vaccine now to protect themselves, their community and those who cannot be vaccinated. Rigorous clinical trials involving thousands of people aged 12 and over have proven that vaccines are safe and effective. Nearly 200 million Americans have been safely vaccinated.

Free COVID-19 vaccines are widely available statewide for anyone 12 years of age and older. To get a vaccine, visit MySpot.nc.gov or call 888-675-4567. Anyone interested in getting the vaccine can text a postcode to 438829 to find nearby vaccine locations.


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Judge jails suspected victim of domestic violence for potty use https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/judge-jails-suspected-victim-of-domestic-violence-for-potty-use/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 11:04:53 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/judge-jails-suspected-victim-of-domestic-violence-for-potty-use/ The 2019 General Assembly appointed James P. Fisher, former chief prosecutor for Fauquier, for an eight-year term on the circuit court. By Ned OliverVirginia Mercury A Loudoun County judge interrupted the testimony of the alleged victim in a domestic violence felony trial last week to question her drug use, sentencing her to 10 days in […]]]>

The 2019 General Assembly appointed James P. Fisher, former chief prosecutor for Fauquier, for an eight-year term on the circuit court.

By Ned Oliver
Virginia Mercury

A Loudoun County judge interrupted the testimony of the alleged victim in a domestic violence felony trial last week to question her drug use, sentencing her to 10 days in jail for contempt of court after saying she smoked of marijuana earlier in the day.

She was then “physically removed from the witness stand by several MPs,” according to a brief filed by the Commonwealth Prosecutor’s Office, which supports the woman’s motion to quash the contempt charge filed by the judge. Circuit Court James P. Fisher, former chief prosecutor of Fauquier. .

The woman, who prosecutors said did not appear to be intoxicated, served two days in jail before being released on $ 1,000 bail, court records show.

“In the midst of a difficult (cross-examination), she was detained, questioned, arrested and removed from the courtroom,” wrote Deputy Commonwealth Prosecutor Elena Ventura, who argued that the woman no. ‘had “not been treated with the respect, sensitivity or dignity required by law.”

Marijuana is now legal in Virginia and prosecutors wrote in their brief that their witness was just anxious and nervous for about an hour and a half of testifying against her partner, who was twice convicted of abusing her. . They said Judge Fisher’s investigation followed “an intense and assertive (defense) questioning focused on drug addiction and infidelity.”

Prosecutors also wrote that Judge Fisher refused to hear from detectives who interacted with her before the trial, who they said testified that “her behaviors were consistent with all previous interactions and that she exhibited no sign of intoxication before his testimony ”.

But the biggest problem, the Commonwealth Lawyers ‘Office said, was that Judge Fisher’s actions “may create a chilling effect on victims’ willingness to testify in domestic violence cases, an area of ​​law already filled with victims. retracting and / or refusing to cooperate, due to the many traumas suffered by victims of domestic violence through the cycle of power and control, especially in cases where victims have mental health issues, such as… in the present case.

Judge Fisher, the former Commonwealth of Fauquier lawyer and former chairman of the Republican County Committee, was appointed by the General Assembly for an eight-year term in 2019. Efforts to take office have failed and the judges de Virginie rarely comment on the proceedings.

This isn’t the first time Judge Fisher has jailed someone in his courtroom for contempt – a move that legal observers say is unusual in Virginia.

Judge Fisher had divorce lawyer Rachel Virk jailed overnight in January 2020 after finding her in contempt of court during a hearing in which she urged him to clarify a decision. The Virginia Court of Appeals dismissed her appeal from the prosecution on a technical point, ruling that because the jail order was signed by the court clerk rather than the judge, there was no jurisdiction. to challenge it. Ms Virk has since filed a lawsuit against the court clerk and the sheriff, which is still pending.

Under Virginia’s summary contempt law, a judge can immediately fine someone up to $ 250 and jail them for up to 10 days for misconduct, violence, threats of violence. or “vile, contemptuous or insulting language” in court.

In last week’s domestic violence trial, the witness’s attorneys said her actions fell short of that standard. The Mercury does not identify her as she is an alleged victim of domestic violence and has not given permission to use her name.

“She did not admit to having any illegal activity and did not admit to being under the influence in the courtroom,” said Tom Plofchan, an attorney for Loudoun who represents her with Ryan Campbell. “There was no smudge in her words, nothing to indicate that she had taken some kind of intoxicant that was affecting her speech or muscle movement.”

Mr Plofchan also questioned the timing, noting that it was an afternoon trial and that there had been no investigation into when in the morning she had consumed the drug. marijuana and how much she had taken.

Both parties also took issue with Judge Fisher’s questioning of the witness, noting that she was never made aware of her constitutional rights and of Miranda and that the “independent investigation” he conducted in the questioning about his drug use was prohibited by the judicial canon.

A hearing on the motion to quash the contempt charge is scheduled for next week.

The case has not gone unnoticed by lawmakers across the region, who have called Judge Fisher’s decision to jail a victim of domestic violence disturbing.

“In general, when it comes to victims of domestic violence, there is a history of not treating the victim with respect and dignity and we are supposed to protect them first,” said Senator Jennifer Boysko, a Democrat. which represents parts of Loudoun.

Senator Scott Surovell (D-Fairfax), a lawyer, asked if the witness would have been treated the same if she said she had instead drunk a beer that morning.

“When we passed the marijuana legalization law, one of the things we tried to do was make sure that marijuana was treated the same as alcohol,” said Senator Surovell. “I think it’s important in the future for everyone to remember that possession and use of marijuana is now legal.”

The case has also caught the attention of marijuana reform advocates, who have called the case an emblem of the stigma that cannabis users continue to face.

“In 2020, Virginia ended the practice of imprisoning individuals for using cannabis, and in 2021 made this use explicitly legal for people 21 years of age and older,” said Jenn Michelle Pedini, executive director of Virginia NORML, the state branch of the National Organization to Reform the Marijuana Laws. “Yet these code changes do not facilitate an immediate end to the stigma faced by those who choose to use cannabis, many of whom will continue to be discriminated against by those who are still attached to long-held stereotypes.”


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Suspect in murder of PJ Evans released from prison after previous weapons charges – NBC4 Washington https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/suspect-in-murder-of-pj-evans-released-from-prison-after-previous-weapons-charges-nbc4-washington/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 23:02:51 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/suspect-in-murder-of-pj-evans-released-from-prison-after-previous-weapons-charges-nbc4-washington/ One of three men arrested in the murder of 8-year-old Peyton “PJ” Evans, in Prince George County, has a history of gun violence and has been released from prison on bail in two pending cases, the Minister said. state attorney for the county. News4 said. The suspects, Desmond Nkwocha, 21, Mark Nkwocha, 23, and George […]]]>

One of three men arrested in the murder of 8-year-old Peyton “PJ” Evans, in Prince George County, has a history of gun violence and has been released from prison on bail in two pending cases, the Minister said. state attorney for the county. News4 said.

The suspects, Desmond Nkwocha, 21, Mark Nkwocha, 23, and George Shamman, 23, all face charges of attempted first degree murder, second degree murder and weapons-related charges, a indicated the police.

Desmond Nkwocha has been charged with firearms in two separate cases, including one this year, state prosecutor Aisha Braveboy said. He was not behind bars, although he had already violated his probation.

Eight-year-old Peyton “PJ” Evans was shot and killed while at a friend’s house after shooters opened fire outside on a group of people on August 24.

Braveboy said the state requested that Desmond Nkwocha be held without bail in two separate bail reviews. In both cases, the court released him on bail, she said.

“However, we intend to fully prosecute both cases on pending trial dates,” Braveboy said in a statement.

Eight-year-old Peyton “PJ” Evans was killed on August 24 after being shot while in a relative’s apartment in Landover, Md., Playing a video game and playing a video game. eating tacos, his family said.

“These suspects attempted to steal the future of an innocent child, but we know his legacy will live on and his light will never be able to go out,” Prince George County Police Chief Malik said Thursday. Aziz.

News4’s Darcy Spencer reports on the tribute that took place for the little boy who was killed by a stray bullet in Landover, Maryland.

The three suspects are being held without bail.

PJ was preparing to enter third grade and had already gone to buy new shoes for the school year, his family said. His mother, Tiffani Evans, described him as a mathematician and said he had a bright future.

“It’s all I had. It’s all I’ve lived for.… I’ve sacrificed so much in my life for this little boy, and now my son has gone to some cowardly dudes who wanted to do it. loose things instead of being a man, ”she said. .

At a press conference Thursday, Evans said police solved the case in 21 days, his son’s favorite number.

“Long live PJ, long live 21,” she said. “Twenty-one is our angel number. ”

Evans also spoke to the parents.

“Hold your babies everyday and tell them they love them because they are our future,” she said.

“Every kid in this field has me forever,” Evans continued.

Chief Aziz said they couldn’t tell who pulled the trigger and killed the boy. Detectives are still investigating the provenance of the guns involved in the crime, Aziz said.

If anyone has more information about this fatal shooting, they are asked to call detectives at 301-516-2512 or anonymously at 1-866-411-TIPS (8477) and refer to the number File # 21-0038549.


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9/11: Revisiting Everett’s Role in American History https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/9-11-revisiting-everetts-role-in-american-history/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 09:50:04 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/9-11-revisiting-everetts-role-in-american-history/ EVERETT, Wash. – When the sergeant. Mike Atwood of the Everett Police Department returned home from a shift at the Snohomish County Jail Cemetery on September 11, 2001, the last thing he expected was to be woken up by his family informing him of the attacks on the World Trade Center. Sgt. Mike Atwood He […]]]>

EVERETT, Wash. – When the sergeant. Mike Atwood of the Everett Police Department returned home from a shift at the Snohomish County Jail Cemetery on September 11, 2001, the last thing he expected was to be woken up by his family informing him of the attacks on the World Trade Center.

Sgt. Mike Atwood

He watched the towers fall on television, speechless, and thought to himself, “The world will never be the same again. On that day, he could never have predicted that in 15 years, he would honor the Americans who responded and fell, ultimately contributing to American history as a whole.

A year after the September 11 attacks, Mike Atwood joined the Everett Police Department, and in 2016, while working for the Major Crime Unit, his partner James Massingale was called to the captain’s office on an urgent matter. Atwood got worried after a while, wondering if a serious issue was within reach. When Massingale finally emerged, his face was filled with musing. Atwood began to joke with him that he was in trouble, asking him what the meeting was about, but Massingale kept repeating that he couldn’t talk about it.

Soon after, Massingale approached Atwood with a special case. An American flag had been handed over to the department which had possible links to September 11.

Thomas E. Franklin iconic photo of three New York firefighters erecting an American flag on a piece of the destroyed World Trade Center instantly became, and remains to this day, one of the most famous and identifiable images caught that fateful day. But just five hours after this photo was taken, the flag disappeared.

Brien Browne, former Marine Corps collector and collector of American historical artifacts, was watching the History Channel in his Everett home when his jaw dropped. The Lost History episode revealed that the famous American flag in Franklin’s photo – the flag hoisted and celebrated from Yankee Stadium to the Arabian Sea – was not the flag they thought it was. The program asked, if the flag sent around the world was the wrong flag, where was the real flag? Browne knew the answer; it was up in his collection.

Brad Meltzer’s Lost Story: What Happened to the Ground Zero Flag? | Story

Years earlier, an anonymous New York man married a woman Everett and returned to New York where the man had been hired as a first responder. The man answered the call from the World Trade Center site on September 11, cut off an American flag after Franklin photographed it, folded it, and placed it in his pocket. He would eventually die of health problems directly related to the response to the terrorist attacks. Alone and devastated, the man’s widow decided to return to her hometown of Everett to be closer to her family, taking with her her husband’s possessions and with them, the flag.

When she was finally able to relieve the affairs of her late husband, the woman presented the flag to Browne’s friend, who later presented it to Browne at a barbecue, noting his interest in historical American relics.

The doorbell rang at Everett Fire Department Station 1 on Rucker Ave and 36th Street shortly after Browne realized what he had in his possession. Knowing that unexpected announcements such as these typically include medical emergencies, Everett firefighters responded to the call urgently only to see a man, who appeared healthy and safe, standing outside. from the station. The man handed a Joanne Fabric and Craft plastic bag to the confused firefighters and told them he had a piece of American history. The man was Browne.

Firefighters removed the flag, noticing it was wrapped in ropes and insulating tape, removed them to make the flag look better, and put it back in the bag to hand it over to administration.

During a discussion of the history of flags between Deputy Chief Everett PD and the Everett Fire Department Deputy Fire Marshal, the Fire Marshal revealed that a flag had been flown the day before by a citizen, claiming to be the famous flag featured in Franklin’s iconic photo. Astonished, the deputy chief demanded to see the artifact, which was in the Fire Marshal’s office, and immediately handed it over to the evidence room, assigning Massingale the task of verifying whether this mind-boggling claim was true.

“Detective Massingale is a former ranger and an incredibly patriotic man. It was really appropriate to be handed this matter over to him, ”Atwood told the Lynnwood Times.

When Atwood and Massingale received the flag, they treated it as evidence of a crime scene and were unable to reassemble the flag the way it was handed over. They took a picture of him, handled him with gloves and began their investigation which would last for the next two years. Atwood told the Lynnwood Times that visually it looked like a match, down to the number of wraps of electrical tape around the string. The original flag in Franklin’s photo was taken from the Star of America yacht moored in the Hudson River and erected on a 20-foot pole found in debris from the attacks with electrical tape and rope.

The two-year investigation was kept very secure with only a total of about four people knowing what was going on to prevent issues such as theft or tampering.

Detective Steve Paxton of the Washington State Criminal Lab was brought in to perform the forensic analysis for authentication. When Atwood and Massingale approached Paxton’s supervisor about the matter, a member of their office stumbled upon a computer desk which activated the monitor displaying Franklin’s photo as a background image. It was then that the importance of this case was felt.

Analyzed by Bill Schkeck of the Spokane Washington State Patrol Crime Lab, the flag rendered by Browne was determined to be America’s missing flag. In his forensic report, the DNA of the FDNY firefighters who detained him on September 11 as well as the debris of the fallen World Trade Center towers were conclusive.

When the two Everett detectives held a meeting to discuss this discovery, they invited another Everett police officer, Edward Golden, who served with the NYPD during the 9/11 attacks and was one from first responders to attacks. Golden walked over to the flag, grabbed it, brought it to his face and said, “That’s the smell I remember; I will never forget that smell.

“[Golden is] Probably the nicest person I have ever met. His name is Golden and he pretty much is, ”Atwood told the Lynnwood Times.

When the 9/11 flag was last folded in Everett, before the History Channel and Chub Insurance brought it back to New York City, Golden was chosen to do the honors.

“Every American, and even non-Americans, has a belief, a feeling and a thought when they see an American flag. Everyone’s perception of this flag is different; everyone has had different experiences in this country. . . and that’s what I think every time I see an American flag, ”Atwood told the Lynnwood Times.

To this day, the 9/11 flag is on display at the September 11 Museum in New York.

“Flags are symbols – symbols of hope, symbols of strength, symbols of us. But on this trip, I also realized that flags are mirrors, this flag in particular. And when you watch it, you’ll see what you need, and you’ll see something about yourself, ”said Brad Melter, History Channel and host of Lost History.


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Ready for a new real crime documentary to watch? Here are 6 not to be missed | https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/ready-for-a-new-real-crime-documentary-to-watch-here-are-6-not-to-be-missed/ Sun, 12 Sep 2021 01:29:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/ready-for-a-new-real-crime-documentary-to-watch-here-are-6-not-to-be-missed/ TV critic Lorraine Ali is one of the biggest true crime aficionados on the Los Angeles Times TV crew, having covered everything from Netflix’s “Crime Scene: The Vanishing at the Cecil Hotel” to “I’ll Be Gone in the Dark ”from HBO. And nothing marks the changing of the seasons like coming in the summer sun […]]]>

TV critic Lorraine Ali is one of the biggest true crime aficionados on the Los Angeles Times TV crew, having covered everything from Netflix’s “Crime Scene: The Vanishing at the Cecil Hotel” to “I’ll Be Gone in the Dark ”from HBO. And nothing marks the changing of the seasons like coming in the summer sun and snuggling inside all fall watching documentaries about the dastardly deeds of humans.

Here, she offers a sample of movies and series to watch this fall if you can’t live without real crime.

“Cold Justice” (Oxygen, currently airing)

Now in its sixth season, Oxygen’s top-rated series continues to travel to small towns across the country to tackle unsolved homicide cases that have dragged on for years with no answers or justice for victims and their families. Veteran District Attorney Kelly Siegler and his rotating team of seasoned detectives – Steve Spingola, Tonya Rider and Abbey Abbondandolo – are teaming up with local authorities to compile and uncover enough compelling evidence for an arrest and conviction. To date, the team has successfully contributed to 49 arrests and 21 convictions. The real crime series produced by Dick Wolf never fails to reveal astonishing oversights in cases where police departments are small and murder victims are economically depressed. A staple of the true crime genre.

“Reasonable doubt” (ID Channel, currently airing)

She is a criminal defense lawyer. He’s a retired homicide inspector. Together, Fatima Silva and Chris Anderson form the team behind “Reasonable Doubt,” ID’s half-hour weekly forensic investigation series that seeks to uncover the truth behind the contested convictions. The duo are using their collective expertise and many outside resources to reexamine murder cases at the behest of families and advocates who believe the wrong person is behind bars.

The series, which ends its fourth season on September 20 and will be available to stream on Discovery + on September 21, often focuses on cases of convicts who do not have the resources to employ their own private or non-court-appointed investigators. . defense lawyers to clear their names. Silva and Anderson review the evidence with law enforcement and witnesses familiar with the case, and consult with outside forensic teams and experts before drawing their own conclusions. Is there a realistic chance of appealing, or do supporters of incarceration face the overwhelming truth that their loved one may have been rightfully convicted of murder? The duo help emotionally stranded families of convicts move on, one way or another.

“Monsters Within: The 24 Faces of Billy Milligan” (Netflix, September 22)

In 1978, Billy Milligan became the first person in US history to cite multiple personality disorder in a defense of insanity. But were his multiple personalities really in control of his actions, or were they just the pretext of a dangerous narcissistic sociopath? Netflix’s four-part investigative series revisits these questions and the crimes of the rapist who terrorized Ohio State University prior to his arrest and later claimed he had no recollection of the assaults. French director Olivier Megaton (“Taken 2” and “3”) applies a cinematic lens to the docuseries format as he follows the Milligan family, friends, doctors and law enforcement agencies who are still trying to figure it out. state of mind of Milligan at the time of his alleged crimes and at trial.

A litany of psychiatrists diagnosed Milligan, who was in his twenties when he was charged, with “multiple personality disorder” (now known as dissociative identity disorder). They determined that he had as many as 24 distinct “multiples,” which led a jury to find Milligan innocent by reason of insanity. The historic verdict rocked the criminal justice system, and its repercussions are still debated today.

‘Buried’ (Showtime, October 10)

How reliable is human memory? Reliable enough to convict someone of murder decades after a crime? “Buried” follows the gripping story of Eileen Franklin, who, while playing with her young daughter, suddenly remembered witnessing the 1969 rape and murder of her childhood best friend, Susan Nason. , 8 years old, in their hometown of Foster. City, California. This led to the reopening of the 20-year-old Cold Case, and in a shocking twist, Franklin remembered that the culprit was his own father, George Franklin.

Armed with Eileen’s story, San Mateo County prosecutors secured a conviction in 1990, sentencing George to life in prison. It was a first. Never before has the recovered memory been used in a criminal prosecution. The docuseries follow the aftermath of this fateful decision via first-person testimonies from family, neighbors, memory experts, law enforcement and mental health professionals, exploring the questions it sparked. on the accuracy and reliability of “repressed memory”, especially when applied to traumatic events. The impact of Eileen Franklin’s memory on the legal and mental health communities is a drama in itself and even eclipses the gruesome crime that precipitated this decades-old family / courtroom saga.

“Frontline: American Reckoning” (PBS, November to be confirmed)

The 1967 murder of NAACP leader Wharlest Jackson Sr. in Natchez, Mississippi, and a family’s search for answers are at the heart of this Frontline’s Un (re) solved documentary, a project that investigates the cold case of the civil rights era. murders. From acclaimed directors Brad Lichtenstein and Yoruba Richen, the film chronicles the journey of Jackson’s family as they search for the truth about what happened to Jackson, combining real footage, interviews, in-depth reporting and documents from unpublished archives. His death in a car bomb is one of more than 150 murders investigated under the Emmett Till Unsolved Civil Rights Crime Act, enacted in 2008 to solve the murders of those who did not ‘have never been done justice. The FBI interviewed several hundred people in its investigation into Jackson’s death, but no one was ever prosecuted and the case was ultimately closed.

Now, working with Concordia Sentinel reporter Stanley Nelson, the filmmakers are interviewing experts and witnesses and examining allegations of involvement of a branch of the Ku Klux Klan, the Silver Dollar Group. The film gives context to today’s racial calculation and how far we must go to heal the wounds – and right the wrongs – of America’s violent past.

“The Slow Hustle” (HBO, TBD)

Veteran Baltimore Police Detective Sean Suiter is found shot dead while on duty. Was it a murder, a suicide, or an ordered coup in his own department? Directed by “The Wire” star Sonja Sohn, who also delivered the captivating 2017 doc “Baltimore Rising”, “The Slow Hustle” explores the shady circumstances surrounding Suiter’s death and uncovers a scandal filled with corrupt cops, multiple cover-ups and failure. Political system.

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© 2021 Los Angeles Times. Visit latimes.com. Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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Family of four including two boys, 6 and 9, who died in the Lake Avon massacre; Authorities suspect murder-suicide https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/family-of-four-including-two-boys-6-and-9-who-died-in-the-lake-avon-massacre-authorities-suspect-murder-suicide/ Thu, 09 Sep 2021 01:57:08 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/family-of-four-including-two-boys-6-and-9-who-died-in-the-lake-avon-massacre-authorities-suspect-murder-suicide/ Avon Lake Police have identified family members of four who were found dead at their residence Tuesday in a suspected murder-suicide in northeast Ohio. Authorities said Jeffrey Hull, 50; Heidi Hull, 46 years old; Garrett Hull, 9; and Grant Hull, 6; were found bloodied and dead from gunshot wounds at a house on English Turn […]]]>

Avon Lake Police have identified family members of four who were found dead at their residence Tuesday in a suspected murder-suicide in northeast Ohio.

Authorities said Jeffrey Hull, 50; Heidi Hull, 46 years old; Garrett Hull, 9; and Grant Hull, 6; were found bloodied and dead from gunshot wounds at a house on English Turn near Avon Belden Road on Tuesday, Cleveland.com reported.

Heidi Hull’s employer FM Global called police and asked for a welfare check after the matriarch, now their senior vice president of operations, missed a conference call at work.

The company had deployed staff to monitor its staff, but no one answered the front door to Hull’s home, prompting them to seek police assistance.

Police said the front door to the house was locked when they arrived at around 1:18 p.m., but spotted the killed victims when they inspected the house through its back windows.

Preliminary inquiries show that Jeffrey may have shot his wife and two children before he finally pulled the trigger. Detectives said the fatal shootings remained under investigation, but noted they had no other history of calls for home welfare checks.

The family dog ​​was also taken to the Avon Lake veterinary clinic after being found with gunshot wounds. According to Texas News Today, the animal succumbed to its injuries as a result of this appalling incident.

On Tuesday, schools in Avon Lake City released a statement mourning the loss of youngsters Grant and Garrett. The superintendent said a team of counselors are at the school to help students, staff and families affected by the news, Fox8 Noted.

“Please observe your child closely over the next few days and weeks to watch for signs of distress, which may indicate a need for additional support and guidance,” the statement said.

“Be understanding and tolerant of common grieving reactions, including: decreased appetite, difficulty sleeping, reduced ability to concentrate, increased sadness and social withdrawal,” he said. he continued, urging parents to express their feelings in a calm and appropriate manner to help them. encourage students to open up.

Preliminary inquiries show that Jeffrey may have shot his wife and two children before he finally pulled the trigger. Detectives say the fatal shootings remain under investigation, but noted that they had no other history of calls for home welfare checks. This is a representative image. Unsplash


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Labor Day in America and how it became a federal holiday https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/labor-day-in-america-and-how-it-became-a-federal-holiday/ Thu, 02 Sep 2021 04:07:52 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/labor-day-in-america-and-how-it-became-a-federal-holiday/ Labor Day in America and how it became a federal holiday As we celebrate Labor Day, getting ready for family and friends around the pool or barbecue, have you ever thought about why Labor Day has started? Today, many Americans enjoy paid time off on Labor Day, but on September 5, 1882, the first time […]]]>

Labor Day in America and how it became a federal holiday



As we celebrate Labor Day, getting ready for family and friends around the pool or barbecue, have you ever thought about why Labor Day has started? Today, many Americans enjoy paid time off on Labor Day, but on September 5, 1882, the first time Labor Day was celebrated, it was very different.

Defended by Peter J. McGuire of the Carpenters Union and Mathew McGuire of the Machinists Union, 10,000 workers took unpaid leave to march from City Hall to Union Square in New York City to protest the conditions of the time. The typical workday was 12 hours, six or seven days a week, with weekly wages ranging from $ 0.55 to $ 1.20 in the mid to late 1800s. Yes, it’s weekly – not hourly. Adjusted for inflation, this stands at around $ 36 per week today. In short: long hours of work in dangerous conditions for a salary that does not support a family.

Our industrial history is full of accidents causing tens or hundreds of deaths per incident. On December 6, 1907, in Monongah, West Virginia, an underground mine explosion killed 362 of the 380 men and boys working that day. On January 10, 1860, in Lawrence, Massachusetts, the Pemberton Mill factory collapsed without warning, killing 145 workers and injuring 166.

One of the most infamous incidents, which helped organize the work and initiate reform around safety and building codes, was the Triangle Shirtwaist fire. On March 25, 1911, a Saturday afternoon in New York City, 600 workers, mostly young women, were working when a fire broke out in a trash can on the 8th floor. Workers attempted to put out the blaze, but found rotten pipes and rusty valves. The fire could not be brought under control and quickly spread. The elevator broke after only four trips. Exits were locked to prevent unauthorized ruptures, and firefighting ladders could only reach seven stories. The only way to escape the suffocation or the sharp burn was to jump.

“In 18 minutes, it was all over. Forty-nine workers were burned alive or suffocated by smoke, 36 died in the elevator shaft and 58 died jumping on the sidewalks. With two more dead later from their injuries, a total of 146 people were killed by the blaze. “- Histoire.com

During the industrial revolution of the late 1800s and early 1900s, if you went to work, there was a good chance you wouldn’t go home. Allegheny County, Pennsylvania issued a “Industry death calendarWhich placed a red “x” for every person who died in the county every day from July 1906 to June 1907. An “x” was missing within 70 days and 526 workers died that year in a single county. If you went home, you would likely be treating injuries, broken bones, amputations, or worse.

Lewis Hine’s photograph provides insight into the working men, women, girls and boys and the working conditions they face. Hine, investigative photographer for the National Child Labor Committee, traveled the country photographing child labor conditions in all industries, including children in coal mines, meat packing factories, textile factories and canneries. Often times he worked his way into factories to get past managers who didn’t want public scrutiny. Discover his fascinating work at the National Archives.

While today’s workplaces are not free from danger, injury or death, we’ve come a long way. But the way we got here was hard won, sometimes resulting in violence. Take into account Haymarket Riot of 1886, when police clashed with union protesters in Chicago, or the Pullman strike in May 1894 which pitted railway workers fighting for safer conditions and better hours against federal troops and an army of private detectives.

While most of us celebrate Labor Day on the first Monday in September with the day off, it’s easy to forget that Labor Day history is filled with struggle, courage, challenge, injury and death.

Take a moment to remind yourself of how we got the eight hour workday, overtime, machine guards, air quality monitoring, respirators, lockout / tagout procedures, equipment fall protection, workers’ compensation insurance and standards that provide all of us with a safe and healthy workplace. And don’t forget the thousands of retail, hospitality, food service, emergency and healthcare workers who work on Labor Day. To you, we offer you a big “thank you”.

So on this Labor Day remember that it is not just a holiday, it is a holiday for work. Without the lives and members of the workers who came before us, and the unions and leaders who spoke out, there’s a good chance more of us will be spending that first Monday in September in a hospital – or, worse yet. , a morgue.

For a more in-depth discussion of the origins of Labor Day and the working conditions of the Industrial Revolution, check out the latest MEMIC Safety Experts Podcast – How Workplace Safety Influenced Labor Day – Celebrating the American Worker.

By Peter Koch

Courtesy of MEMIC Safety Net Blog



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Disclaimer: WorkersCompensation.com publishes independently generated writing by various stakeholders in the workers’ compensation industry. Opinions expressed are solely those of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of WorkersCompensation.com.


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Police arrest two men and seize gun from inside vehicle near Queen Victoria Market https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/police-arrest-two-men-and-seize-gun-from-inside-vehicle-near-queen-victoria-market/ Thu, 26 Aug 2021 05:24:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/police-arrest-two-men-and-seize-gun-from-inside-vehicle-near-queen-victoria-market/ Police broke into Melbourne’s Queen Victoria Market where detectives search a car and a man remains handcuffed on the ground. Photo: NCA NewsWire / Sarah Matray Police seized a gun after stealing from a vehicle near Melbourne’s Queen Victoria Market and arresting two men. Officers stopped the Holden Astra on Franklin Street on Thursday at […]]]>
Police broke into Melbourne’s Queen Victoria Market where detectives search a car and a man remains handcuffed on the ground. Photo: NCA NewsWire / Sarah Matray

Police seized a gun after stealing from a vehicle near Melbourne’s Queen Victoria Market and arresting two men.

Officers stopped the Holden Astra on Franklin Street on Thursday at around 1:45 p.m. and arrested two men, while non-uniform detectives searched the vehicle.

Detectives search a car in Queen Victoria's markets.  Photo: NCA NewsWire / Sarah Matray
Detectives search a car in Queen Victoria’s markets. Photo: NCA NewsWire / Sarah Matray
The police emptied the car of its contents.  Photo: NCA NewsWire / Sarah Matray
The police emptied the car of its contents. Photo: NCA NewsWire / Sarah Matray

They stripped the car of its contents and found a gun in the market parking lot in North Melbourne.

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The police also lifted the hood of the car and looked at the engine inside.

Police handcuffed a man as they searched his vehicle on Franklin Street.  Photo: NCA NewsWire / Sarah Matray
Police handcuffed a man as they searched his vehicle on Franklin Street. Photo: NCA NewsWire / Sarah Matray

There were approximately six uniformed officers and two detectives at the scene.

Victoria Police have confirmed the incident and said a 34-year-old man from Melton South and a 21-year-old man from Robinvale have been arrested.

They assist investigators in their investigations.

anthony.piovesan@news.com.au

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