History Corps – Hamline Midway History http://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 17:50:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/hamline-midway-history-icon-150x150.jpg History Corps – Hamline Midway History http://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/ 32 32 Who is a blacksmith in Daredevil? The Story of the Real Identity and the Punisher Explained https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/who-is-a-blacksmith-in-daredevil-the-story-of-the-real-identity-and-the-punisher-explained/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 17:50:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/who-is-a-blacksmith-in-daredevil-the-story-of-the-real-identity-and-the-punisher-explained/ Ray Schoonover, aka the Blacksmith, has a fascinating history within the MCU, being intrinsically tied to both Daredevil and the Punisher. The blacksmith was one of daredevil main antagonists of Season 2, and his origin is closely tied to that of the Punisher. daredevil season 2 introduced the Punisher to the MCU, casting him as […]]]>

Ray Schoonover, aka the Blacksmith, has a fascinating history within the MCU, being intrinsically tied to both Daredevil and the Punisher.

The blacksmith was one of daredevil main antagonists of Season 2, and his origin is closely tied to that of the Punisher. daredevil season 2 introduced the Punisher to the MCU, casting him as something of a villain to Matt Murdock before the show gradually revealed that the real villain behind Frank Castle’s season-long story was the blacksmith, aka Ray Schoonover . Although the Schoonover story ended in daredevil, its connections to Frank Castle’s origin story were developed in The Punisher. With appearances in both daredevil season 2 and The Punisher season 1, Blacksmith has a fascinating history within the MCU, combining traits from several Marvel comic book characters.

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The MCU launched a series of TV shows on networks like ABC and streaming services like Netflix and Hulu during Phase 2 of the franchise. Although Kevin Feige was not involved in the production of the MCU Netflix shows, they were created to be the canon of the franchise. The stories and characters of Netflix MCU shows only occasionally mention material from the movies, but they fit nicely into the MCU timeline nonetheless. With Marvel Studios and Kevin Feige now managing the MCU TV shows, which air exclusively on Disney+, the canonical status of the original MCU TV shows was questioned by many viewers.


Related: How Blade Could Have Appeared In The MCU Earlier (If Marvel Had Allowed It)

This changed with the release of Hawk Eye and Spider-Man: No Coming Home, which featured appearances from The Kingpin and Matt Murdock, Not only did their appearances (especially Kingpin’s) reinforce that daredevil was a canonical part of the MCU, but they also renewed their interest in Netflix MCU shows. Ray Schoonover, in both his civilian identity and his villainous alter ego, the blacksmith, provides the connective tissue between daredevil and The Punisher, being partially responsible for Frank Castle’s anti-hero origin and pitting him against Matt Murdock in a clash of philosophies as much as fists and bullets. The MCU’s Blacksmith takes his name from several Marvel Comics characters while adapting Ray Schoonover’s comic continuity version.


Who is Ray Schoonover? Real identity of the blacksmith


Roy Schoonover Blacksmith

Ray Schoonover is introduced as a former commanding officer and mentor to Frank Castle during their service in the US Marine Corps. However, Schoonover was secretly a drug lord, who operated anonymously using the alias Blacksmith. As revealed in The Punisher season 1, Schoonover and his blacksmith identity were part of Operation Cerberus, a CIA assassination program that lacked congressional approval or any other form of oversight, necessitating Schoonover’s heroin operation to finance it. As squad leader of the U.S. Marines, Schoonover co-led Squad Cerberus alongside his colleagues Punisher the villainous William Rawlins, a member of the CIA. Schoonover lost an arm during one of Cerberus Squad’s missions, but he and the rest of the unit were saved by Castle, leading Schoonover to speak favorably of him as a character witness during the trial of Castle.


After the failure of Operation Cerberus, Schoonover continued his anonymous work as a blacksmith, filling a void left in the New York underworld when Wilson Fisk was incarcerated at the end of daredevil season 1. Tasked with covering up his involvement in Rawlins’ torture and unlawful killings of Cerberus, Schoonover became one of the criminals responsible for Frank Castle’s Punisher origin. Schoonover arranged a meeting between several criminal organizations in Central Park, where Castle and his family were spending time together. The Blacksmith caused a shootout between the gangs, intending for Castle and his family to die in the crossfire, but Frank survived and later became the Punisher.


Daredevil’s Blacksmith’s Connection To The Punisher Explained


Blacksmith Roy Schoonover

Punisher serves as both opponent and foil to Matt Murdock in daredevil season 2. As Daredevil, Murdock does not kill or permanently harm criminals, while the Punisher was on a mission to avenge his family, killing all criminals associated with the gangs who killed his family in Central Park. This led to a conflict between the two vigilantes, with Daredevil eventually capturing Punisher. Schoonover, meanwhile, took the opportunity to frame Castle for his crimes as a blacksmith, but the Punisher escaped captivity and learned that his former mentor had organized the gang fight that killed his family. Punisher killed Schoonover but learned his family’s death was far more important than he thought.

Related: What If The Originally Planned Phase 1 Avengers Had Battled Thanos?

The base of The Punisher season 1 was Frank Castle’s denouement of the Schoonover plot, showing the blacksmith’s continued presence, even after his death. It turns out Castle wasn’t the only person targeted for murder by Rawlins. While the CIA member instructed Schoonover to kill Frank Castle, he instructed a corrupt member of Homeland Security to assassinate NSA analyst David Lieberman. Both attempts failed, and the two gradually undid Schoonover and Rawlins’ illegal work, resulting in Rawlins’ death. Although Punisher exacted revenge on those responsible for his family’s death, his combat training and vigilante activities were due to Schoonover.


Is Blacksmith in Marvel Comics?


Death of blacksmith Roy Schoonover

The MCU’s Blacksmith is based on several Marvel Comics characters, with Ray Schoonover (who doesn’t use the alias Blacksmith) being the most significant inspiration. Schoonover was, similarly, Frank Castle’s commanding officer, though he and Castle fought in Vietnam instead of Afghanistan like they did in the MCU. Given Marvel Comics’ use of a sliding timescale, the Vietnam setting would likely be updated in a modern retelling of its original appearances. Like his MCU counterpart, Schoonover was secretly a drug lord who later had members of his unit murdered to maintain secrecy. Schoonover committed suicide after the Punisher forced him to reveal the truth about his illegal activities.

Unlike his MCU counterpart, Schoonover has nothing to do with the death of Frank Castle’s family, and subsequently his origin as the Punisher. In the comics, Castle’s family members witnessed a mob hit and were later killed by law enforcement. The MCU’s Schoonover used the nickname Blacksmith to hide his identity, but that title was never used by his comic counterpart. Instead, the name “Blacksmith” has been used by several minor villains in the comics, including a wrestler and a Skrull. The MCU’s version of Ray Schoonover and his alias the blacksmith made a very important villain for the Punisher and Matt Murdock, as shown daredevil season 2.


Next: The Best Marvel TV And Film News Reveals Of 2021

  • Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness (2022)Release date: May 06, 2022
  • Thor: Love and Thunder (2022)Release Date: Jul 08, 2022
  • Marvels/Captain Marvel 2 (2023)Release date: February 17, 2023
  • Black Panther: Wakanda Forever/Black Panther 2 (2022)Release date: November 11, 2022
  • Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 (2023)Release date: May 05, 2023
  • Ant-Man and the Wasp: Quantumania (2023)Release date: July 28, 2023

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New Street Names in Arts and Design District Aim to Reduce Confusion and Honor Legacies • Current Edition https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/new-street-names-in-arts-and-design-district-aim-to-reduce-confusion-and-honor-legacies-current-edition/ Thu, 20 Jan 2022 22:20:01 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/new-street-names-in-arts-and-design-district-aim-to-reduce-confusion-and-honor-legacies-current-edition/ Several numbered streets in the Carmel Arts and Design District will have new names starting next week that pay homage to the area’s history. The city has worked with the Carmel Clay Historical Society to create many new street names, each honoring a local historical figure, business, or organization. They range from Stubbs Way, named […]]]>

Several numbered streets in the Carmel Arts and Design District will have new names starting next week that pay homage to the area’s history.

The city has worked with the Carmel Clay Historical Society to create many new street names, each honoring a local historical figure, business, or organization. They range from Stubbs Way, named after a track star at Carmel High School in the late 1940s, to Supply Street, named after Carmel Supply Co. which operated in the 1920s through 1940s.

The name changes, which are expected to take place on February 1, are intended to eliminate confusion, as the current system of streets and avenues centered around Main Street and Range Line Road lead to multiple addresses with slight differences in different neighborhoods.

“We have four 1st Streets and 1st Avenues within two blocks of Main Street and Range Line Road,” Carmel Mayor Jim Brainard said. “It’s confusing for the post office. It’s confusing for people moving here. It’s really confusing for visitors, even with GPS.

He thinks the numbered system raises security issues.

“Our employees are well trained (on street names), not to say people don’t make mistakes,” he said. “I’m more concerned about someone who visits a home and doesn’t understand the quadrant system and can’t convey it properly to the 911 operator.”

The city alerted affected homeowners and business owners to the pending change through a letter listing more than two dozen organizations, such as the Bureau of Motor Vehicles and insurance companies. , to contact with updated address information.

Rochelle Swensson, who moved to 3rd Avenue NE (a street with a name change still pending) six years ago, said she struggled to interpret the address system when she moved to the first time in the region. It doesn’t cause much of a problem now, although she does occasionally end up with mail intended for someone else at a similar address.

“I love living here,” she said. “Whatever my address is, tell me, and I hope it won’t be difficult (to change it).”

Dina Kancs, Swensson’s neighbor, does not support the change. She said she had not experienced any confusion with the existing system in her six years in the neighborhood and affected landlords had not been consulted about the change.

“I feel like it’s a waste of time and resources. There are other things we could do with the resources that are allocated to that,” Kancs said. “The little grid helps define our neighborhood as a whole.”

The following information from the CCHS and the City of Carmel shares the history of many of the new street names.

Minnie Doan

Minnie Doane joined the Women’s Army Auxiliary Corps in 1942. She served at General Douglas MacArthur’s United States Army Headquarters in Australia, New Guinea and the Philippines. Her three years abroad were the only time in her life that she lived outside Carmel.

Doane returned home and worked for the telephone company for 43 years. She was elected to Carmel’s first city council in 1976. Over the years, Doane has been recognized by many organizations for her volunteer work and community service. Carmel Mayor Jane Reiman presented her with a key to the city and she was named Sagamore of the Wabash, among other accolades.

Bill Stubbs

Bill Stubbs was a track star at Carmel High School from 1947 to 1950. Sportswriters tried several nicknames for him, the Carmel Meteor, Blazing Bill, Bullet Bill and Carmel’s One-Man Track Team, but the one that stuck was the Carmel Comet. .

Stubbs was a star and crowds showed up wherever he raced hoping to see him break a record. By the time he graduated, he held the school and Hamilton County records in the 100 and 220 yard sprints as well as the long jump. He also held the section record for the 220-yard dash and the regional record for the two dashes. He posted the state’s best time in both sprints in his sophomore year, junior and senior, and earned national recognition for running the nation’s second-fastest 100-yard sprint in 1949.

Stubbs raced for three trainers in four years, none of whom had experience in the sport, and trained on grass because Carmel had no track.

The little family

The Smalls were a pioneer family in Carmel. In 1871, Eli Small purchased a warehouse at the northeast corner of Main Street and Range Line Road from Stewart Warren. Small’s son, Levi, soon after left his medical practice and ran the store for his father. Small’s Pharmacy carried a full line of general merchandise and many groceries. He then opened a photography studio on the second floor which produced pewter types.

Levi Small became a town elder and was active in politics. He served on city council in the 1880s and built a town hall on land east of his store in 1887. In 1889 he published and edited Carmel’s first newspaper, The Carmel Signal. He served as a justice of the peace for the township of Delaware in the late 1890s and as a city clerk from 1901 to 1906. The LJ Small Drugstore was a staple in town until Levi Small’s death in 1926.

George Ketchum

George Ketchum was a member of the Lenape tribe. His family settled along Cool Creek around 1810. During the War of 1812, the U.S. government moved the tribe to Piqua, Ohio. Ketchum and several other Lenape were selected to be scouts for William Henry Harrison’s frontier army during the war. Ketchum fought in the Battle of the Thames in which Harrison’s army defeated the British and took control of the Northwest Territories.

After the war, Ketchum cleared land and built a cabin near the intersection of Smoky Row Road and Range Line Road. In 1832 he sold his land and traveled west to join the tribe in Kansas. Ketchum died in Oklahoma at the age of 100.

Barbara Burget

Barbara Burget was a young girl when her family moved from Virginia to a fortified outpost in Kentucky called Ruddle’s Station at the start of the Revolutionary War. In 1780, an army of 150 British and Canadian soldiers and nearly 1,000 Native American warriors surrounded the fort and took everyone captive. Burget was adopted by a Lenape woman and lived with the tribe for the rest of her life. His daughter married George Ketchum, a member of a prominent Lenape family. Burget moved with the Ketchums from Ohio to what is now Carmel around 1810.

After Burget’s husband died in 1811 or 1812, she established a trading post on the west bank of the White River north of 96th Street near a river ford between two Lenape villages. She became wealthy in the fur trade. In 1832, she sold her land and traveled west to join the tribe in Kansas.

John Phelps

John Phelps purchased the southwest corner of Main Street and Range Line Road in 1835. He was one of the founders of the town of Bethlehem and contributed two lots to the original dish in 1837. Phelps’ cabin was the first house built in the city.

earth-rich

In 1830, Quakers living on the north side of Delaware Township and the south side of Washington Township established a church at the intersection of Smoky Row Road and Range Line Road. That year they organized the first official school in Clay Township. In 1833, they named their church Richland Meeting. The name was suggested by Benjamin Mendenhall, the first Quaker to settle in present-day Carmel. The Richland Friends built a new brick schoolhouse in 1868 and leased it to the township, which ran a public high school in the building. This was the origin of Carmel High School.

Carmel Supply Co.

The Carmel Supply Co. was a major supplier of coal, cement, tiles, harness and other products to Carmel from the 1920s through the 1940s. Vic Almond operated the store for many years, as did Oscar Applegate.

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California Volunteers and California Institutions of Higher Education Announce Historic University Service Program – YubaNet https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/california-volunteers-and-california-institutions-of-higher-education-announce-historic-university-service-program-yubanet/ Wed, 19 Jan 2022 01:24:51 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/california-volunteers-and-california-institutions-of-higher-education-announce-historic-university-service-program-yubanet/ CALIFORNIA, January 18, 2022 – Today Governor Gavin Newsom and leaders of California’s college and university systems joined Director of Services Josh Fryday to launch the largest statewide investment in a university services program of California history. California Volunteers announced the 45 colleges and universities selected as inaugural partners for the service-based college opportunity program. […]]]>

CALIFORNIA, January 18, 2022 – Today Governor Gavin Newsom and leaders of California’s college and university systems joined Director of Services Josh Fryday to launch the largest statewide investment in a university services program of California history. California Volunteers announced the 45 colleges and universities selected as inaugural partners for the service-based college opportunity program.

“California is a world leader in both higher education and services,” Governor Newsom said. “The #CaliforniansForAll College Corps advances these priorities by connecting Californians from diverse backgrounds with rewarding service opportunities across the state while making college more affordable for our state’s future leaders. We hope the Corps will be replicated across the country.

#CaliforniansForAll College Corps will provide up to 6,500 college students over two college years with service opportunities in critical areas like climate action, K-12 education, and COVID-19 recovery. Students who complete a year of service will receive $10,000 while gaining valuable experience serving their communities. This program will bring together young Californians from all backgrounds in service and, for the first time, specifically create state-funded opportunities for AB 540-eligible Dreamers to serve their communities.

A total of 45 campuses representing the University of California, California State University, community colleges, and private university systems were selected as program participants through a competitive grant application process. The full list of schools is available here.

“Today is a historic day in California. The Governor, alongside leaders from the world’s top higher education systems, offered a monumental proposition to the next generation of Californians: If you pledge to serve your community, we help you pay for your college education,” said Josh Fryday, California Services Director and California Volunteer Manager.

Nearly four million Californians owe $147 billion in student debt, with black and Latino Californians facing the highest default and delinquency rates. Governor Newsom has prioritized the #CaliforniansForAll College Corps as part of an effort to lead the nation down service-centric paths, easing the debt burden of our recent graduates while moving the state forward with service-oriented careers.

“The University of California is pleased to partner with Governor Newsom on this innovative program, which will help thousands of students pay for their education while giving back to their communities,” said Michael V. Drake, president of the University of California. “Providing more pathways to a debt-free degree while allowing students to pursue service-oriented career paths is a reflection of our shared commitment to access, affordability and public service.”

“California State University students who have participated in the pilot program over the past year have taken their world-class CSU training and translated it into hands-on tutoring and mentoring in their communities,” said Chancellor of California State University, Joseph I. Castro. “This program is an invaluable opportunity for our students to not only give back to their communities, but also help prepare the next generation of CSU students for success. We look forward to even greater opportunities for students selected in the Corps’ inaugural year.

“The #CaliforniansForAll College Corps creates service opportunities for community college graduates that support our communities while creating career paths for our graduates,” said Chancellor of California Community Colleges, Eloy Ortiz Oakley. “Community college partnerships selected in this first group of recipients include deploying our students to feed those who depend on our food banks. I am heartened to see that the Governor’s initiative recognizes the value of investing in community college students, who have tremendous gifts to offer through their service and future leadership.

“California’s private, nonprofit colleges and universities have prioritized student aid in recent years as costs for students have soared nationwide. Our colleges and universities have also historically prioritized service to the communities in which their students live and learn. The #CaliforniansForAll College Corps espouses these goals transparently and helps fill the financial aid gaps faced by many of our low-income students while pursuing the goal of serving our state in areas that need it. most needed. We are proud to have participated in the pilot program over the past year and are honored to continue with our members as campus partners and direct beneficiaries of this inaugural year,” said Kristen Soares, President of the Association of Independent Colleges and Universities.

Led by Josh Fryday, Director of California Services,California Volunteers, Office of the Governorempowers Californians to take action to improve their communities. #CaliforniansForAll is a California Volunteers service initiative launched in response to COVID-19 to establish a volunteer corps to support the state’s response to emergencies and disasters.

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Smith, vet, pilot, NAACP leader and ‘hidden’ figure in Bloomington history | Story https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/smith-vet-pilot-naacp-leader-and-hidden-figure-in-bloomington-history-story/ Mon, 17 Jan 2022 06:09:31 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/smith-vet-pilot-naacp-leader-and-hidden-figure-in-bloomington-history-story/ The McLean County History Museum Archives serves as the repository for the Bloomington-Normal Black History Project. The project houses a diverse collection of materials that tell the rich stories of black residents who lived and worked and contributed to the well-being of their community – many of whom, over time, have become “hidden” characters. One […]]]>

The McLean County History Museum Archives serves as the repository for the Bloomington-Normal Black History Project. The project houses a diverse collection of materials that tell the rich stories of black residents who lived and worked and contributed to the well-being of their community – many of whom, over time, have become “hidden” characters. One such individual is the late Navy veteran, pilot, flight instructor, and civil rights activist Joseph Mack Smith.

The McLean County History Museum, 200 N. Main St. in Bloomington, is a treasure trove of local history, from farming and civil rights to home and work life. Here are some things that caught our attention at the museum.



Born in Litchfield on April 11, 1911, Smith arrived in Bloomington in 1929. He attended Illinois State Normal University for three years and studied football. He also attended Wilberforce University in Ohio. Smith married Cora Keene of Alton in 1936. The 1937 Bloomington City Directory lists her occupation as “Chauffeur, Murray and Carmody Funeral Home”. This type of work was typical of blacks, as other job opportunities were rarely granted at the time.






This July 9, 1943 photo shows Chief Steward Joseph Smith, who was at home in Bloomington on leave while serving in the Navy during World War II.


MCLEAN COUNTY HISTORY MUSEUM


McLean County has a long history of volunteering for military service. Smith was one of them, enlisting in the Navy to fight in World War II. He followed a family tradition as his father, Floyd Smith, served in the Navy in World War I and re-enlisted in World War II, serving in the South Atlantic. Joseph’s brother, Theodore, also served in the navy and was stationed on a ship in the Pacific.

While on home leave in July 1943 to see his wife, Cora, at their home at 708 S. Oak St. in Bloomington, Chief Steward Joseph Smith spoke with Pantagraph reporter Harold Liston.

In the interview, Smith shared that he carried the scars of torpedo fragments with him. He was injured when two torpedoes hit the ship in the North Atlantic. The order was given to abandon ship and Smith found himself on a life raft adrift at sea for three days before being picked up by a British corvette.

He had a close friend who was killed in the attack and swore to avenge his death. Smith received gunnery training at Naval Station Great Lakes on Lake Michigan and became a gunnery crew captain.

Returning from the war, Smith turned his head towards the sky and obtained his pilot’s license at Bloomington airport in 1945. He did not stop there. He then earned an instructor rating in 1948. Smith taught flying at Lakeside Airport in East St. Louis and was able to return to Bloomington as a flight instructor in 1958 at Bloomington Airport.

Additionally, as a flight instructor for Capital Aviation in Springfield, Smith served as an accident prevention advisor. He became the second person outside the Federal Aviation Administration to receive such a designation.

Unbeknownst to most, in December 1967, Richard Knoedler of Streator, owner of Norbi Air, the operator of Bloomington Airport, announced that Smith would be the airport’s new manager. However, shortly thereafter Clark Aviation took over as operator of the airport and appointed Smith chief instructor for its pre-flight ground school in March 1968.

In March 1969, Smith was cleared by the FAA to conduct multi-engine land flight tests as a check pilot, flying the Beechcraft 95-55 and the Cessna 310. It was quite an achievement indeed.

As Smith pursued his aspirations in the sky, he was also busy on the ground, immersed in the fight for equal rights. Further research into his life reveals that he served as president of the local NAACP and was outspoken on equality issues as early as 1955.

He wrote a letter to the editor of the Pantagraph titled “Believes the law is the only path to racial equality.” The letter was a rebuttal of a Pantagraph editorial which suggested progress was being made on “the rapid and effective elimination of racial barriers without a Fair Employment Practices Commission (FEPC)”.

In response to these assumptions, Smith said: “Yet the examples of progress cited in the editorial are those in which such progress has been achieved through the enactment of a law, either through legislation, or by court decisions establishing a precedent.” Smith went on to say, “Although the Pantagraph opposes the FEPC, it provides contradictory evidence of the erasure of racial barriers by the very process it condemns, that of progress coming from new laws emanating from the legislatures and courts.”

The letter was signed, “JOSEPH M. SMITH President, Bloomington-Normal NAACP.”

Interestingly, this kind of local public debate took place the same year the Reverend Martin Luther King Jr. graduated from Boston College seminary.

Indeed, Smith was very communal. He and his wife, Cora, were well-connected in black and white communities. He served as a porter for notable members of the black community, along with Girard Covington (Dr. Eugene Covington’s son), Paul Ward and Reginald Whitaker.

Smith ran for Bloomington City Council in 1953, and he was a charter member of the Bloomington Corn Belt Kennel Club for more than 25 years, judging dog shows, giving talks in the community, and serving as vice president. and treasurer of the organization.

In 1966, an elderly citizen left Smith $1,500 in her estate “for years of loyal service.” He continued to be active in the community and was appointed to Bloomington’s Citizens’ Community Improvement Committee in 1970.

On June 2, 1971, in a letter to the FAA District Office of Illinois, Smith voluntarily relinquished his Pilot Examiner designation certificate, as he did not have a current medical certificate.

Smith died on March 31, 1975, while on his way to St. Joseph’s Hospital. Just before his death, he was playing the organ with other music students at the Unitarian Church at 1613 E. Emerson St. in Bloomington.

He served as Illinois State Director for the International Negro Airmen, an organization dedicated to promoting African American involvement in aviation along with other minorities and had recently been elected chairman of their board. administration.

Smith was a member of St. Mary’s Catholic Church where services were celebrated by Father Alphonse.

Today, the Bloomington-Normal Black History Project continues to collect stories from members of the community, illuminating “hidden” figures in history and preserving their stories for future generations.

Pieces From Our Past is a weekly column from the McLean County Museum of History. Candace Summers is the museum’s Director of Community Education.

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Do you know this man? Living John Doe found wandering in Michigan https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/do-you-know-this-man-living-john-doe-found-wandering-in-michigan/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 16:45:27 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/do-you-know-this-man-living-john-doe-found-wandering-in-michigan/ This man was found near Houghton, Michigan. He doesn’t remember who he is and may have been a veteran. The Houghton County Veterans Services office is asking the public to help identify the man pictured above. He was found wandering near Lake Perrault in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula in the summer of 2021. According to the […]]]>

This man was found near Houghton, Michigan. He doesn’t remember who he is and may have been a veteran.

The Houghton County Veterans Services office is asking the public to help identify the man pictured above. He was found wandering near Lake Perrault in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula in the summer of 2021.

According to the Houghton County Veteran Service Office (HCVSO), the only clues the unidentified man has are that he thinks his name might be Lincoln Maxfield, that he may have been born in 1963, and that he may have – to be served in the army.

This John Doe’s only possessions included a cell phone that had no contact number stored in memory. HCVSO contacted the mobile carrier, but no name was associated with the account. The only information they could provide was that the phone was activated near ZIP code 28012, located in North Carolina.

The fingerprints were taken by the Houghton County Sheriff‘s Office, but no matches have been found to date.

A Good Samaritan provided “Lincoln” with accommodation, but this arrangement was only temporary. The Good Samaritan had a trailer ‘Lincoln’ could stay in, but the harsh winter cold made the lifestyle too difficult to pursue.

Unfortunately, the HCVSO says it is unable to provide assistance to “Lincoln” until he is able to prove his veteran status.

As hard as it is to believe that someone would forget who they are, it’s not unheard of. There are many medical conditions and traumatic injuries that could prevent a person from remembering who they are.

HCVSO says Lincoln is extremely frustrated, hopeless and embarrassed by his situation. He says he’s ready to do anything to find out who he is.

Anyone with information about the identity of this living John Doe is asked to contact the Houghton County Veterans Services Office via a private message on their social media page. You can follow the post below on the HCVSO social media page. Just click on it, login to your account and you can send a direct message.

Click here to see more mysteries

WATCH: 100 years of American military history

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Two-year study could provide answers on why Waverly flooded https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/two-year-study-could-provide-answers-on-why-waverly-flooded/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 22:28:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/two-year-study-could-provide-answers-on-why-waverly-flooded/ WAVERLY, Tenn. (WTVF) – The federal government is committing thousands of dollars to investigate how and why Trace Creek in Waverly gets so flooded during heavy rains. Although the 2021 flood was by far the worst in the city’s history, it wasn’t the first time Trace Creek had flooded. This is why community leaders have […]]]>

WAVERLY, Tenn. (WTVF) – The federal government is committing thousands of dollars to investigate how and why Trace Creek in Waverly gets so flooded during heavy rains.

Although the 2021 flood was by far the worst in the city’s history, it wasn’t the first time Trace Creek had flooded.

This is why community leaders have commissioned various floodplain studies over the past few years. Now the US Army Corps. of Engineers is on the case.

“You’re going to have a detailed flood assessment of the entire Trace Creek watershed, which has never been done before. So it’s going to take into account the entire basin,” said Thomas Herbert, chief of the Nashville District Plan Formulation Section for the U.S. Army. Body. of Engineers.

Starting next week, Herbert’s team will begin tracing and measuring every bend in Trace Creek, including where it typically floods.

“In the upstream areas where most of the heaviest water fell during the flood, then passed through the city, all the way down Trace Creek to the mouth,” Herbert said.

“There will definitely be many pages in the report,” said Ashley Fuentes, project manager for the Nashville District Project Planning Branch.

But the final report will not only contain raw data, it will also offer potential solutions.

“It would be the technical data that would help people know where some of the best investments might be to reduce the risk of future floods,” Herbert said.

They will look at questions like – should the bridges over Trace Creek be rebuilt? Should the creek be diverted at certain sections?

But such complicated questions will take time to answer. The study can last up to two years.

“They will look at things like waterway chokes, bridge flow chokes and things like that,” Herbert said.

But Thomas hopes that if the study is done well, it can prevent history from repeating itself.

“It was a very big flood that happened and hopefully we can play a part in part of the solution,” he said.

Waverly Mayor Buddy Frazier told NewsChannel 5 that this study will help them better understand why Waverly is flooding and will ultimately make the community safer.

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Stay in Seattle: Sounders Academy alumnus Dylan Teves joins club as local player https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/stay-in-seattle-sounders-academy-alumnus-dylan-teves-joins-club-as-local-player/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 00:39:41 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/stay-in-seattle-sounders-academy-alumnus-dylan-teves-joins-club-as-local-player/ Dylan Teves stays at home. The Seattle Sounders announced the signing of local player Dylan Teves from the University of Washington on Tuesday. Teves, 21, spent four years at Sounders Academy before joining the Huskies program. Notable in Rave Green’s youth system, Teves made 12 appearances for Sounders 2 in the USL Championship, including several […]]]>

Dylan Teves stays at home.

The Seattle Sounders announced the signing of local player Dylan Teves from the University of Washington on Tuesday. Teves, 21, spent four years at Sounders Academy before joining the Huskies program. Notable in Rave Green’s youth system, Teves made 12 appearances for Sounders 2 in the USL Championship, including several starts, before making his way to college.

A native of Hawaii, Teves becomes the second Academy graduate to sign with the club’s territory first team. He joins a rich lineage of Hawaiian players throughout the history of the organization.

“We have been very fortunate to have such a close bond with Hawaii for a long time,” Sounders FC general manager and president of football Garth Lagerwey told MLSsoccer.com during the league’s live stream for the SuperDraft. MLS 2022. “Two famous players that most people who listen to this are likely to know are Brian Ching and Zach Scott… I’m happy to report that we’ve signed Dylan Teves, so we have our newest Hawaiian joining the Sounders for the season 2022. “

Building on his excellent USSDA and USL performances with the Sounders, Teves made his debut at Washington University as a freshman in 2018. In four years, he scored 25 goals and 23 assists in 69 games, winning back-to-back wins. berths on the first team All Pac-12 in its last two seasons.

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Evaluating Ibrahim and the Reward for Hard Work – Blueprint Newspapers Limited https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/evaluating-ibrahim-and-the-reward-for-hard-work-blueprint-newspapers-limited/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 05:11:01 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/evaluating-ibrahim-and-the-reward-for-hard-work-blueprint-newspapers-limited/ “The price of success is hard work, dedication to the job at hand, and the determination that whether we win or lose, we applied our best to the task at hand. »Vince Lombardi. The above quote aptly describes the exploits of Major General Shuiabu Ibrahim, CEO of the National Youth Service Corps (NYSC). A lot […]]]>

“The price of success is hard work, dedication to the job at hand, and the determination that whether we win or lose, we applied our best to the task at hand. »Vince Lombardi.

The above quote aptly describes the exploits of Major General Shuiabu Ibrahim, CEO of the National Youth Service Corps (NYSC). A lot could have been said about recent innovations at NYSC. However, not enough credit was given to this man, who has shown an unwavering commitment to the service of the country.

He was an example of hard work and dedication. He brought his experiences as an academic and administrator to good use, so it’s no wonder he was able to implement policies that positioned the NYSC in this viable institution to fulfill his mandate.
I remember when he took charge of the project, not many people knew much about him, and they thought it was going to be business as usual. But they had no idea that the NYSC was poised for a rapid transformation into this hub for the fulfillment of the dreams of our teeming youth.

Under the leadership of Major General Shuaibu Ibrahim, the NYSC was able to introduce a mechanism that significantly reduced the problems of false results. We all know that the problem of students with false results was almost a pandemic. It was so widespread that it brought phenomenal embarrassment to the country. We feasted on stories of our supposed corporation members who couldn’t compose an appropriate grammatical sentence. Some did not even know the meaning of the NYSC. It was so bad.
Today, that is ancient history, as strict measures were instituted to ensure that people with false or unqualified results were not enrolled in the NYSC program. Instead, we are sprinkled with innovations from corporate members towards nation building.

Another critical aspect of Major General Shuaibu Ibrahim’s leadership, among others that I would like to highlight, is the role of corps members in electoral processes in Nigeria. A striking example was the recent governorate elections in Anambra State. It is recorded that the CEO was physically present in the state and visited almost all areas of the local government to inspect the conduct of the members of the corps.
He not only inspected their activities, you could see a link between the corps members and the CEO. This bond looks like a father-son / daughter relationship. That’s the vibe at NYSC today, where members of the body see the CEO not as the CEO but as a role model. His penchant for work resonates with every member of the company, which has increased the productivity level of company members in their various major duty stations.

Plan staff are not left out either. They would gladly tell you that it is a new dawn in the NYSC since the arrival of Major General Shuaibu Ibrahim. Some have attributed this to the fact that he had a previous stint as a military assistant to a former DG as a young officer. And it was easy for him to understand the issues that needed to be resolved in order to reposition the NYSC.

My summary of Major General Shuiabu Ibrahim is when intelligence meets hard work. Some might not realize that in addition to wearing the rank of Major General, the CEO is also a professor of military history. At one point in his distinguished career, he headed the Department of History and War Studies at the Nigerian Defense Academy. He was also the first registrar of the Nigerian Army University in Bui, Borno State, where he laid a solid foundation for the university to take off. And to this day, his records at the Nigerian Defense Academy and the University of the Nigerian Army stand tall.

Major General Shuaibu Ibrahim also testifies that the country recognizes and rewards hard work with his recent rise to the rank of Major General. It is instructive to mention that he was a brigadier general when he resumed his duties at the NYSC. And the rise to prestigious rank has come as no surprise to many who know his style as a quintessential scholar and administrator, and one who sees what others don’t and thinks outside the box to solve problems.
A good example is the NYSC trust fund project which recently passed first reading in the Federal House of Representatives.

By silencing the idea of ​​the NYSC Trust Fund, it was found that the goal was to ensure that members of the company have the necessary funds to translate their business ideas into reality.
In my opinion, the NYSC Trust Fund is not about members of society; it is about the teeming youth of the country. From all indications, the NYSC Trust Fund is proving to be a key vehicle in tackling youth unemployment in the country.

Admittedly, youth unemployment remains a problem that requires the attention it deserves. And here we have a man who has looked beyond what the NYSC has for the hundreds of thousands of young people who go through the program each year to think about how to harness their potential even after completing their year of college. service.

People like Major General Shuiabu Ibrahim are exemplary in their conduct, hence the carnival atmosphere when news leaked that the CEO was awarded the rank of Major General. The atmosphere was electrifying in the various NYSC offices across the country. The staff and corps were cheerful and sang his praises to Heaven. The display of love by everyone is a sign that merit and hard work indeed have no religion or tribe. He is everyone’s friend.

For Major General Shuiabu Ibrahim, the price of success is hard work, dedication to the job, and the determination that, whether we win or lose, we applied our best to the task at hand. I salute this exceptional Nigerian who redefined leadership. Congratulations, Major General Sir! may this new grade bring you more work.

Akintunde is a public affairs analyst based in Ado-Ekiti, Ekiti State.
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Marine Corps veteran talks about his “baptism by fire” in Vietnam https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/marine-corps-veteran-talks-about-his-baptism-by-fire-in-vietnam/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 14:01:42 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/marine-corps-veteran-talks-about-his-baptism-by-fire-in-vietnam/ Ask any Marine if he remembers the first day he became a Marine and you’ll likely be told it was training camp graduation day. Whether it’s Parris Island or San Diego, it wasn’t until the senior graduation program officer proclaimed the graduates “Marines” that the title applied. For officers, it would be a similar graduation […]]]>

Ask any Marine if he remembers the first day he became a Marine and you’ll likely be told it was training camp graduation day. Whether it’s Parris Island or San Diego, it wasn’t until the senior graduation program officer proclaimed the graduates “Marines” that the title applied. For officers, it would be a similar graduation from Officer Candidate School when their second lieutenant butter bars were pinned to their uniforms.

The designation could not come at any time before that, and no matter how successful the recruits or officer candidates were in the various stages of training leading up to graduation day, if they did not get their diplomas weren’t Marines.

But as many Marines will also tell you, there are other defining moments on the journey to becoming a veteran of the Marines that overshadow the training camp experience. These include baptism of fire, when Marines first enter combat and learn how they will react when the enemy shoots directly at them.

Ron Winter inside a clog in Quang Tri, South Vietnam, four months and over 100 missions in his tour. Photo courtesy of the author.

For me, that moment came on June 1, 1968, during a first assault as we sent troops to an area south of Khe Sanh where the North Vietnamese Army (NVA) was building a road under cover of a triple canopy jungle. I responded appropriately and survived, but even though it was a personal step, something was missing. Even though I couldn’t articulate it, I could feel it.

Two more months would pass before I filled this gap, even if those two months included my first medical evacuations, reconnaissance team insertions and emergency extractions, and night flights in hot areas – the range of missions helicopter crews face in wartime.

During the summer of 1968, the 1st, 3rd, 4th and 9th Marine Regiments operated in the northernmost I Corps and along the demilitarized zone between northern and southern Vietnam, and opened new fire bases south of Khe Sanh near the Laotian border, including the Torch, Robin and Loon landing zones. By mid-August, I had completed nearly 100 missions as a door gunner aboard CH-46 Sea Knight helicopters from HMM-161 Squadron (Military Helicopter Transport Squadron), including several in this region.

Although my baptism of fire had taken place two months earlier in this same region, and it is now August, that day was different. While the initial assault in June was the responsibility of the 4th Marine Regiment, later in the summer elements of the 1st and 3rd Regiments also operated in the area. I could only tell which regiment we were carrying if the Marines had written their unit’s identification on their bags, which they often did.

The welcome we received upon entering a hot zone was a failure, as the ANV was underhand and often changed tactics. Sometimes they would open fire on the lead plane – “birds” as we called them – and at other times they would wait for late arrivals which might be made to think the area was free from the enemy. and that they could possibly be caught off guard. guard by a flurry of hostile fire.

Ron Winter standing next to a .50 caliber machine gun on a CH-46D helicopter during the Vietnam War.
Ron Winter stands beside a .50 caliber machine gun inside a CH-46D Marine helicopter between missions in June 1968. Photo courtesy of the author.

That day, they chose to open fire right away. I piloted the starboard gunner (right) in the fourth plane of the flight, and had a brief but still appreciative advance warning of what to come. Crews from previous flights had located enemy positions in a ravine flanked by two ridges on the north side of the area.

As soon as the target section came into view, I opened with my .50 caliber Browning M-2 (Ma Deuce) machine gun. We usually flew with 100 round ammo boxes attached to the side of the machine gun with an elastic cord. At a rate of 500 strokes per minute, I cleared the first box in just over 12 seconds.

I must point out here that in the years after Vietnam, when I encountered grunts at veterans events, they often said that they hated being forced to sit in a helicopter waiting for land, unable to join them, as the enemy, artillerymen and the chief crew fired. It was strange for us too, as we rarely saw those growls again or heard what they encountered on the ground, or if our shot had been effective in giving them enough time to take cover and turn their fire on the enemy. .

No matter which unit we were working with, any assault was nerve-racking for those who wanted to fight but, for safety reasons, had to sit quietly until we landed and lowered the ramp. This probably explains the actions of a growl sitting right next to my machine gun that day in August.

When I ran out of ammo in the box of 100 rounds, instead of loading another box of 100 rounds, I reached a much larger box under the gun holder, grabbing one end of an ammo belt from 500 cartridges.

As I recharged, I noticed the growl stood upright and turned towards me. I cocked the .50 and started firing – all of this happened in just seconds – as it grabbed the ammo belt and started feeding the machine gun with a smoothness that instantly spoke to ‘long experience. Out of the corner of my left eye, I also saw the team leader grab his M-14 rifle, put it into fully automatic mode, and start firing on the hatch on the starboard side of the plane, a few feet in before my station.

Operation Dewey Canyon, Vietnam War
Marines from Echo Company, 2nd Battalion, 9th Marine Regiment captured five on the Ho Chi Minh Trail in northern Laos in February 1969 as part of Operation Dewey Canyon. Photo courtesy of the author.

The crew chief and I were about the same height – about five feet seven inches, less than 150 pounds – and the M-14’s recoil made it take a few steps back each time it fired. But he loaded up to the hatch and opened again, oblivious to the force of the recoil. Looking back, it was pretty funny, but no one was laughing then. We kept firing and I used about 200 more rounds. I stopped shooting as we settled into the area and the team leader opened the rear ramp using his remote.

I watched the grunts charge to take their assigned positions in what was a rapidly expanding perimeter. But just as he had to turn in the direction of the battle, the growl that fueled my machine gun stopped, looked back for a moment, and gave me a “thumbs up” accompanied by the biggest smile I ever had. could have imagined. Then he was gone.

At that moment, for the first time, I really felt like a member of the Navy air-ground team. I didn’t know the Marine sitting next to my position, but he reacted immediately and we each did our part in the brief but intense firefight. And he was obviously grateful to be part of the action rather than standing still, enduring what we called the “wrinkle factor.” Much later, I realized that a similar scenario could have happened with a myriad of other participants, but that moment was our moment in the limelight.

Fire Base Lightning, Vietnam War
A CH-46 helicopter from the HMM-161 flew over Lightning Fire Support Base, a forward artillery base made up of ROV troops, in February 1969. The fire support base a was carved out of the wild to support US Navy operations in the A Shau Valley adjacent to the Laotian border. Photo courtesy of the author.

I’ve heard that the whole course of our life can change in an instant, and the decisions we make at that time can affect everything we do afterwards. The time spent in this exchange of fire was two minutes – the maximum – but it caused a drastic change in my feelings about my role in the war we were waging.

I am not speaking here of philosophical questions or serious concerns about the rationale for America’s involvement in Vietnam. I’m talking about the simplest factor: two Marines, side by side, helping each other stay alive for the foreseeable future, which could take less than a minute. Almost a year and finally more than 300 missions after this exchange of gunfire, I returned home, I went back to school and tried to get back into society. But the America I returned to, and I hope that growl did too, was not welcoming, and I endured my fair share of physical and emotional abuse.

In the first half of a 20 year journalistic career, I was laughed at and denied promotions, advancements and salary increases by people who had never served their country. and despised those of us who had. Not everyone, of course, but enough to make an impact on my life.

Ron Winter aboard the USS Princeton
Cpl. Ronald Winter aboard USS Princeton, LPH-5, in May 1968, en route to Quang Tri, South Vietnam, with Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron 161. Photo courtesy of the author.

But regardless of what I faced in the years after Vietnam, I have never forgotten that moment when two Marines led the fight against the enemy transparently – a team that was created out of up but worked like we’ve always been training – and got the job done that was necessary. I often passed this moment on to acquaintances who needed a boost and needed to remember what it was like at “The Nam”.

During my career as a journalist, I developed a reputation for calm under the pressure of deadlines, and sometimes when asked about it I would just say, “No one is shooting me. “

The success and teamwork of that moment helped me to be successful in my subsequent endeavors, and the payoff was far better than any medal because from that moment on I knew without a doubt that I was I had really joined the Brotherhood of Marines and the broader Brotherhood of Veterans of All Services. And for the first time, I fully understood – not by definition, not superficially, but deep within myself – the meaning of Semper Fidelis: Always Faithful.

Ronald Winter is a veteran and author of Marine Corps Vietnam, whose recent Victory Betrayed: Operation Dewey Canyon. He joined the Marine Corps in January 1966 and served four years in active service, including 13 months in Vietnam, completing over 300 missions as an air gunner. He received 15 air medals, combat crew wings, the Vietnamese Cross of Bravery and many other decorations. Winter went on to earn degrees in electrical engineering and English literature, and spent 20 years as a print journalist, winning numerous awards for investigative reporting, as well as a Pulitzer Prize nomination.


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Today in Military History: Marines launch Operation Deckhouse V https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/today-in-military-history-marines-launch-operation-deckhouse-v/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 15:34:04 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/today-in-military-history-marines-launch-operation-deckhouse-v/ On January 6, 1967, Operation Deckhouse V was launched in the Mekong Delta during the Vietnam War. The ten-day sweep was a coordinated joint operation between the United States Marine Corps and the Republic of Vietnam Marine Corps. It was a combined amphibious operation with the objective of securing communist munitions depots, ordinance and engineering […]]]>

On January 6, 1967, Operation Deckhouse V was launched in the Mekong Delta during the Vietnam War.

The ten-day sweep was a coordinated joint operation between the United States Marine Corps and the Republic of Vietnam Marine Corps. It was a combined amphibious operation with the objective of securing communist munitions depots, ordinance and engineering workshops, hospitals and other strategic centers.

The amphibious assets were supported by a mixed force of UH-34 and CH-46 helicopters operating from the USS Iwo Jima. Running through January 15, Deckhouse V was a complex logistics campaign that produced disappointing results. Twenty-one Viet Cong were killed, two small arms workshops were destroyed and forty-four weapons were confiscated, but seven US Marines and one Vietnamese Navy died.

There were a number of complications which contributed to the poor results of the mission. Some participants blamed the information leaks, including a possible Filipino radio station broadcasting sea departures from Subic Bay. Others blamed the execution or the rough seas. The nature of the joint operations also complicated the mission; while amphibious doctrine requires Navy and Marine Corps aircraft, the location of Deckhouse V required all air support to come from the Seventh Air Force, adding to the logistical constraint.

Feature Image: US and South Vietnamese combat troops land during “Operation Deckhouse V” in the Mekong Delta. Two US Marine Corps amphibious tractors move along the beach in the foreground, with a UH-1 helicopter approaching from the right. The USS Washtenaw County (LST-1166) is in the background. (Image from the Ministry of Defense)


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