History Corps – Hamline Midway History http://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 13:28:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/hamline-midway-history-icon-150x150.jpg History Corps – Hamline Midway History http://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/ 32 32 San Francisco achieves another first in LGBTQ + history with transgender bishop https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/san-francisco-achieves-another-first-in-lgbtq-history-with-transgender-bishop/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 11:03:25 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/san-francisco-achieves-another-first-in-lgbtq-history-with-transgender-bishop/ For almost all transgender or gender nonconforming people, correcting a well-meaning person when they inadvertently use the wrong pronoun can be very difficult. Bring it in and you risk derailing a pleasant conversation. Let go and you’ll probably think about it all afternoon. But when you are the very first high-ranking trans cleric in a […]]]>

For almost all transgender or gender nonconforming people, correcting a well-meaning person when they inadvertently use the wrong pronoun can be very difficult. Bring it in and you risk derailing a pleasant conversation. Let go and you’ll probably think about it all afternoon.

But when you are the very first high-ranking trans cleric in a large Christian denomination, tasked with caring for people whose familiarity with trans issues might drop anywhere, it is much more difficult.

For Reverend Dr Megan Rohrer, who was installed on Sunday, September 12, as Bishop of the Sierra Pacific Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church of America (ELCA), and who uses the pronouns them / them, the progress meant a sort of learning what not to hear.

“No matter how people talk to me, as long as it was nice it was okay,” they say. “Anytime I was correcting pronouns when I tried to talk pastorally to people, I would turn the topic to them, and then they feel like they have to apologize publicly – which draws even more attention to that.”


Tact is one thing, but feeling the need to apologize for clearly speaking one’s pronouns is a form of internalized transphobia, argues the bishop. And they feel compelled to show how to right this wrong.

“I have a trans child, for whom, if ‘they’ isn’t used, will be in tears for days,” Rohrer says. “It gave me permission to be really public about it, ‘No, you’re going to use’ they ‘, because if you mess with me, I’m going to have grace on it. “Letting people know my pronouns and my name is awesome.

“Not on all stationery,” they add, “but enough that people can find it on Google.”

Reverend Megan Rohrer at a ceremony at Grace Cathedral in San Francisco.

Photograph by Gareth Gooch

In terms of identity and crossing barriers, it’s almost always difficult to navigate the scrutiny that comes with being the first to do anything. And this is not Rohrer’s first time. In 2017, they became the first transgender chaplain in the San Francisco Police Department, at a time when relations between the LGBTQ + community and the cops had strained over scandals involving officers sending homophobic texts and taking of growing awareness of racist police violence. Rohrer thought their (voluntary) position was well suited to create a more constructive atmosphere.

“I really assert the idea of ​​being in the strategic place to criticize all the systems of power, the ones that make the biggest decisions,” they say. “What I have learned from attending many different listening sessions, there is a wide variety of LGBTQ + people in the Bay Area, and I have seen this diversity of thinking about what people want in when it comes to policing, what people thought security was, what people thought was crime. ”

At the request of homeless LGBTQ + youth, Rohrer helped organize a potluck with LGBTQ + agents – some of whom had experienced homelessness themselves and who attended without uniforms. Rohrer expected “a cranky conversation,” but the police listened for three hours, and in the end some of the kids asked for information on how to become cops.

Summarizing this detente between the representatives of two groups which are often at odds, Rohrer declares: “The progress of the world depends on the fact that each new generation believes that it is so right that it makes the world move forward.

Such tensions are not as heightened as they were a year ago. But Rohrer’s installation as bishop comes as large swathes of Sierra Pacific Synod territory are on critical alert for destructive forest fires, which are generating their own spiritual crises. Rohrer sees conflagrations as a source of trauma requiring specialist pastoral care, especially for first responders.

“Every time a bell rings and they have to put on their uniform, they get that rush of adrenaline or cortisone to the brain, which happens when you give birth,” they say over coffee to Judahlicious in the Outer Sunset, three days before their official installation at Grace Cathedral on Nob Hill. “The normal person has 11 critical trauma incidents in their life. For first responders, it’s over 300.

Reverend Megan Rohrer at a ceremony at Grace Cathedral in San Francisco.

Reverend Megan Rohrer at a ceremony at Grace Cathedral in San Francisco.

Photography Gareth Gooch

Firefighters are much more likely than the general population to develop cancer, Rohrer says, and that’s before considering carcinogens workers may inhale while on the job. This was on the bishop’s mind a lot as they embarked on a listening tour of fire-ravaged northern California to visit the 188 Evangelical Lutheran congregations across the vast land. – all from the Oregon border to Visalia, and east to Elko, Nevada – that their synod covers. Creating a Lutheran chaplaincy corps to help with spiritual disaster relief is one of their priorities as bishop, alongside the homeless and LGBTQ + youth.

The tour, with 5,000 miles covered so far, has taken them to the more conservative quadrants of the state where one would expect a cooler reaction to a transgender progressive from San Francisco, but Rohrer has stated that they had not found this to be the case.

“My staff work very hard to make sure that when I visit places they have a non-sexist sign on the bathroom and that people use ‘they’ and ‘them’ [pronouns], says Rohrer. “I’m like ‘Don’t make people do this!’ But they’re like, ‘We don’t want you to die a death from a thousand clippings. We want you to not flinch when people are talking, so that you can be prepared for the tough things. We want you to be good at it.

Rohrer was elected to their post, not appointed, so the welcome reception makes sense to some extent. And as a denomination, ELCA has officially committed to studying gender violence and its impacts since 2018. But the surge of heat was always a surprise.

“In almost every congregation we go to, someone says, ‘I’m here because I love my grandson and I want my grandson to know that, so I’m going to love you a lot now!’ Says Rohrer. “And that’s the best. It’s what keeps people alive.

After growing up in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, they moved to Berkeley, and their understanding of their own gender identity went hand in hand with developing their call for service, Rohrer says. While the Northern Plains States are also not known for their commitment to leftist values, Rohrer’s upcoming return is the result of an official invitation.

“It turns out South Dakota is the sister synod of the Sierra Pacific Synod, so my first trip as bishop will be to spend a week there,” they say. “They make me a distinguished alum. I will be spending a week at my alma mater, Augustana, taking religion classes and helping with worship.

Reverend Megan Rohrer at a ceremony in San Francisco.

Reverend Megan Rohrer at a ceremony in San Francisco.

Photograph by Gareth Gooch

The connotations of the word “evangelical” notwithstanding, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America is among the most progressive and ecumenical dominant Protestant churches in the country, far more so than other Lutheran affiliations. Theologically, ELCA is also in full communion with the Episcopal Church, hence the ceremony at Grace Cathedral in the presence of many supporters and other members of the clergy.

Calling this fellowship “unity but not uniformity,” Reverend Elizabeth Eaton – herself the first female presiding bishop of all of ELCA – noted that Rohrer’s installation as bishop is one of the seven over the next month, which represents a new phase for the church in its call to help the most marginalized and disadvantaged.

“I have known them for many years,” said Marc Andrus, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of California, on Saturday, adding that he had always been “impressed by their commitment to justice on the ground. They radiate joy and welcome.

To this end, Rohrer’s theology seems almost disarmingly simple, with relatively few mile-steps.

“For me, the list comes down to Jesus’ list: love your neighbor, love yourself, love God and take care of your community. This does not mean that I have never had moments of doubt or existential crises, ”they say. “When I go to church, it is to remind me that God has appointed and claimed me, not to chastise me for what I did not accomplish that week. … We are all imperfect humans who mess up every now and then, but at our best times our Lutheran faith community is like cheerleaders: live your fabulousness to the fullest.

Wise words, but hard won. Rohrer admits to struggling with internalized transphobia when deliberating on what to wear to work. Would their hairstyle and non-standard uniform interfere or distract from their ability to do pastoral work outside of LGBTQ + populations? (At Judahlicious, they sport a black velvet jacket and a large cross with an amethyst set in the center, as Welsh tradition has it that amethyst brings careful judgment.)

“Whether I come with sneakers and a t-shirt that says ‘Bishop’ or the more formal French version of bishop’s clothes, people are more interested in me being there with them and being authentic.” , they said. to say.

Peter-Astrid Kane (they / them) is the communications manager for San Francisco Pride and a former editor-in-chief of SF Weekly.




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Third Annual Iwo Jima Flag Race at Palo Duro Canyon Honors Veterans Past and Present | KAMR https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/third-annual-iwo-jima-flag-race-at-palo-duro-canyon-honors-veterans-past-and-present-kamr/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 22:53:19 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/third-annual-iwo-jima-flag-race-at-palo-duro-canyon-honors-veterans-past-and-present-kamr/ AMARILLO, Texas (KAMR / KCIT) – Community members gathered for the third annual Iwo Jima Flag Race at Palo Duro Canyon on Saturday to honor the heroes and pay tribute to an influential moment in Marine Corps history . The Flag Run is a fun, challenging team race dedicated to veterans past and present. “Six […]]]>

AMARILLO, Texas (KAMR / KCIT) – Community members gathered for the third annual Iwo Jima Flag Race at Palo Duro Canyon on Saturday to honor the heroes and pay tribute to an influential moment in Marine Corps history .

The Flag Run is a fun, challenging team race dedicated to veterans past and present.

“Six Marines planted the flag on Iwo Jima, where we lost over 7,000 Marines, and 7,000 Marines were killed at Iwo Jima. So we recognize this battle and my dad who was a survivor of Iwo Jima, but we really do recognize all of the military, with a special focus on the 13 we just lost recently, ”said Johnny Cobb, Iwo Founder Jima Flag Run.

The event began on Saturday with a minute’s silence for the 13 members of the armed forces recently lost in Afghanistan.

Cobb said the idea came to him as a way to honor his father, who served Iwo Jima.

“As soon as they bombed Pearl Harbor, he went to enlist. He joined the Marine Corps and went through the bloodiest battle in Marine Corps history, traveling to Iwo Jima, and then had to occupy Japan after dropping the atomic bombs. He joined the marine reserves, just finished it all and started a business with my mom, and then he’s called back to Korea. So he made quite a trip, and it turned out that part of the radiation exposure he suffered during the occupation in Japan killed him a little later, when I was 13. years, ”said Cobb.

Cobb added that this Flag Run is not an easy task as it is supposed to simulate Mount Suribachi.

“It’s a tough old track going up. Old trail difficult to cross. I mean it’s a challenge and we wanted it to be a challenge. You’re supposed to run together as a team and finish together as a team, a bit of team cohesion, participating in a tough event, ”said Cobb.

All proceeds from Saturday’s event will go to our Brother-Sisters of Our Military Adventures, which help local veterans, first responders and Gold Star families.

When the teams completed the course, they received a jersey, a Palo Duro Canyon Iwo Jima challenge piece, and Schlotzsky’s sandwiches.


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Brooke Museum Continues WWII Education | News, Sports, Jobs https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/brooke-museum-continues-wwii-education-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 04:09:41 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/brooke-museum-continues-wwii-education-news-sports-jobs/ TITLES OF STORY – Jim Brockman, executive director of the American Defenders of Bataan and Corregidor Museum, Education and Research Center, and Chloe Cross, intern at the Franciscan University of Steubenville, examine some of the many newspapers and magazines in the Second World War I era donated by the family of the late Matt Camilletti. […]]]>

TITLES OF STORY – Jim Brockman, executive director of the American Defenders of Bataan and Corregidor Museum, Education and Research Center, and Chloe Cross, intern at the Franciscan University of Steubenville, examine some of the many newspapers and magazines in the Second World War I era donated by the family of the late Matt Camilletti. They are among the many artifacts that help the museum tell the story of the many veterans and others who lived during World War II. – Warren Scott

WELLSBURG – Located in the Brooke County Public Library, the American Defenders of Bataan and Corregidor Museum, Education and Research Center was established to remember the many American servicemen who fought the Japanese invaders of the Philippine Islands during the Second World War.

As part of the library building, the museum was closed for some time due to the pandemic, but it has reopened and welcomes visitors and contributions of items that can help it tell the story not only of these veterans, but other aspects of the war, said Jim Brockman, its executive director.

The museum began in 2002 as a large exhibit created by the late Ed Jackfert and his wife, Henrietta, to educate people about the atrocities suffered by tens of thousands of Allied soldiers held in Japanese POW camps. .

Among them were approximately 72,000 US servicemen and Filipino scouts who took part in Bataan’s infamous death march.

Captured following a three-month battle with the Japanese, troops were forced to march 65 miles in the grueling heat to a train station to be transported in suffocating wagons to POW camps.

But before that, more than 10,000 people had died of illness, starvation or dehydration or were killed when trying to fetch water or falling behind.

Although he did not participate in the death march, Jackfert, an Army Air Corps infantryman, was imprisoned in such a camp and said he was transported to a “Hell ship”.

He said the ships earned this name not only for their inhuman conditions, but also because they were not marked, as prescribed by the Geneva Convention, to deter fire from Allied forces.

Jackfert said the poor conditions experienced by prisoners of war were exacerbated by the fact that they were forced to work for Japanese companies which contributed to that nation’s war effort and benefited financially from their work. slave.

As the leader of the US defenders of Bataan and Corregidor, a national group of surviving prisoners of war, Jackfert campaigned for the Japanese government to issue an apology in 2009.

It was followed in 2015 by another from Mitsubishi Materials Corp., which also donated $ 50,000 to the museum.

Two years later, the Hubbard and Meriwether families collectively donated $ 500,000 for a museum and library expansion that allowed the museum to display several of the hundreds of artifacts that were donated by others. ADBC members and many other veterans and their descendants.

In recent years, the museum has expanded its collection to include other items reflecting the service and experiences of others during the war.

Brockman said his most recent addition is a large collection of newspapers and magazines published during the war and in the years leading up to it.

The periodicals were owned by Matt Camilletti, longtime owner of City Plumbing, Heating and Supply and an active member of the community, who died on March 7. They were donated by Margaret White on behalf of her family.

They relate the main developments of the war.

An October 17, 1941 issue of the Herald-Star reports that the torpedoing of the USS Kearney, an American destroyer responding to an attack by German forces on British and Canadian ships near Iceland, led Congress to demand the armament of Merchant ships.

The same issue reported on the efforts of Communist troops to repel a Nazi invasion of the Soviet Union.

The problem predates the United States’ entry into the war following the Japanese attacks on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941.

A December 22, 1941 issue of Life magazine rescued by Camilletti includes an article on “Defenders of the Philippines”, photos of soldiers killed at Pearl Harbor; and stories designed to prepare readers for war.

A special edition of the Herald-Star in Camilletti’s collection bears the title, “Continent invaded. Allied forces land in France.

Dated June 6, 1944, it announced the landing of thousands of soldiers in Normandy, the first step in the liberation of France occupied by the Nazis, during what many call D-Day.

Camilletti’s collection includes April 13, 1945, issues of the Wheeling Intelligencer and the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reporting the death of President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

“There was a huge funeral when FDR passed away. They spared neither time nor expenses ”, Brockman noted.

The April 4, 1945 issue of the Wheeling Intelligencer reported on the surrender of Germany in what seemed to many to be the end of the war.

But the battle against Japan will continue for several months until the Wellsburg Daily Herald can proclaim on August 15, 1945, “The world is at peace. Japan surrenders. The big guns are still here after 12 long years.

One story below is titled by “Town and county celebrate end of war with parades.”

“Each of these (problems) is important because it tells an important story in history”, Brockman said.

He and Chloe Cross, an intern at the Franciscan University of Steubenville, noted that other stories and magazine advertisements tell a lot about life in America at the time.

For example, an investigation of the 1930s Cosmopolitan issues reveals not only that women’s fashion has changed a lot, but also that the magazine was less about fashion and more of a showcase for fiction at the time.

In addition to Cross, Brockman is helped by two other interns: Brody Hynes, also from Franciscan, and Jonathan Wynn from West Liberty University.

“We have excellent students and others want to come here” Brockman said.

He explained that the students will help him create a digital record of the periodicals and place them in protective sleeves.

He noted that although many of them are in surprisingly good condition, having been stored with very little protection, their thin, yellowed pages nonetheless have brittle edges and would not stand up to frequent handling.

Brockman has said so often that such things are found in the attics and basements of their original owners by descendants who do not know what to do with them.

Among the items that bolster the museum’s efforts to educate about history, he said, “We’re very happy to have this stuff. We don’t want everything to rot. “

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EPA takes action to protect Bristol Bay in Alaska from massive mining project https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/epa-takes-action-to-protect-bristol-bay-in-alaska-from-massive-mining-project/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 15:55:16 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/epa-takes-action-to-protect-bristol-bay-in-alaska-from-massive-mining-project/ The word “Alaska” comes from the word “Alyeska”, an Aleutian term meaning “great land”. It is an apt term for such a majestic place. As great as it is, however, some people might argue that Alaska’s best feature isn’t its land, but rather its water. After all, the state is home to over 3 million […]]]>

The word “Alaska” comes from the word “Alyeska”, an Aleutian term meaning “great land”. It is an apt term for such a majestic place. As great as it is, however, some people might argue that Alaska’s best feature isn’t its land, but rather its water. After all, the state is home to over 3 million lakes, 12,000 rivers, over 6,600 miles of coastline, and over 47,000 miles of tidal shore.

All this water makes Alaska a paradise for anglers, who flock to the state’s marine resources in droves to enjoy its fish fruits. Sadly, one of their favorite places is also one of the most endangered in Alaska: the mineral-rich Bristol Bay, which is the planned site of the Pebble Mine, a gold and mining project. copper which could become the largest mine in North America.

That is, if it is built. Thanks to new measures taken this month by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), it seems less likely that this will be the case.

Plans for Pebble Mine have been publicly debated since the project was first launched almost 20 years ago. In 2014, the Obama administration proposed to block the project due to “unacceptable environmental effects,” citing an obscure provision in the Clean Water Act that allows the EPA to ban or restrict industrial activities that could have an impact. negative impact on environmental resources. The administration argued that the open pit design of the project could destroy 1,200 acres of wetlands, lakes and ponds that are fertile spawning grounds for sockeye, coho, chum and pink salmon. . In addition to a rich commercial fishing industry that supports thousands of jobs, these fish are essential to other species, including more than 20 species of fish, 190 species of birds and more than 40 species of land mammals. , including bears, moose and caribou. mention the natives of Alaska, whose subsistence-based way of life has included salmon fishing for over 4,000 years.

Former President Donald Trump’s EPA subsequently reversed the Obama administration’s stance in 2019 and allowed the mine developer to apply for a permit, which the US Army Corps of Engineers denied for the delighted by Republicans like Donald Trump Jr. and Fox News personality Tucker Carlson, who generally resist environmental regulations but publicly oppose Pebble Mine because they personally enjoy fishing in Bristol Bay.

Now, in another reversal of federal sentiment, President Joe Biden’s EPA is restoring the government’s position in Obama’s time: On September 9, it asked a federal court to allow the aforementioned Clean protections. Water Act for Bristol Bay. If the court agrees, the EPA could begin the process of instituting long-term protections for the Bristol Bay watershed.

“The Bristol Bay watershed is an Alaskan treasure that underscores the critical value of drinking water in America,” EPA administrator Michael Regan said in a statement. “Today’s announcement once again reinforces the EPA’s commitment to making science-based decisions to protect our natural environment. What is at stake is preventing pollution that would disproportionately impact Alaskan natives and protecting a sustainable future for North America’s most productive salmon fishery.

Central to the EPA’s strategy is Section 404 (c) of the Clean Water Act, which requires industry to apply for a permit from the US Army Corps of Engineers in order to dump dredged or fill material into some streams, wetlands, lakes and ponds. In making its clearance decisions, the Corps relies on environmental criteria created by the EPA, which under Section 404 (c) also has the authority to restrict or even block release activities when ‘he believes that they have a negative impact on the environment.

In the 50 years of the Clean Water Act, the EPA has exercised its authority under Section 404 (c) only 13 times. Alaska natives hope Bristol Bay will be No.14.

“[Section 404(c)] protections is something our tribes have been fighting for literally almost two decades now, ”Alannah Hurley, executive director of United Tribes of Bristol Bay, told the Washington Post in an interview, in which she called the latest EPA’s “monumental step in the right direction.”

Pebble Limited Partnership, the entity behind Pebble Mine, has championed its project, which it says will advance environmental goals by enabling a transition to clean energy.


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today in history | OMCP https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/today-in-history-omcp/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 04:18:30 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/today-in-history-omcp/ Today in History Today is Friday, September 17, the 260th day of 2021. There are 105 days left in… Today in history Today is Friday, September 17, the 260th day of 2021. There are 105 days left in the year. The highlight of today’s story: On September 17, 1787, the Constitution of the United States […]]]>

Today in History Today is Friday, September 17, the 260th day of 2021. There are 105 days left in…

Today in history

Today is Friday, September 17, the 260th day of 2021. There are 105 days left in the year.

The highlight of today’s story:

On September 17, 1787, the Constitution of the United States was completed and signed by a majority of delegates attending the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia.

To this date :

In 1862, over 3,600 men were killed in the Battle of Antietam (an-TEE’-tum) during the Civil War in Maryland.

In 1908, Lieutenant Thomas E. Selfridge of the US Army Signal Corps became the first person to die in the crash of a powered plane, the Wright Flyer, at Fort Myer, Virginia, just outside Washington, DC

In 1937, the image of President Abraham Lincoln’s head was dedicated to Mount Rushmore.

In 1939, the Soviet Union invaded Poland during World War II, more than two weeks after Nazi Germany launched its assault.

In 1944, during World War II, Allied paratroopers launched Operation Market Garden, landing behind German lines in the Netherlands. (After the initial success, the Allies were driven back by the Germans.)

In 1954, the novel “Lord of the Flies” by William Golding was first published by Faber & Faber of London.

In 1971, citing health reasons, Supreme Court Justice Hugo Black, 85, retired. (Black, who was replaced by Lewis F. Powell Jr., died eight days after making the announcement.)

In 1978, after meeting at Camp David, Israeli Prime Minister Menachem Begin (men-AH’-kem BAY’-gihn) and Egyptian President Anwar Sadat signed a framework for a peace treaty.

In 1980, former Nicaraguan President Anastasio Somoza (suh-MOH’-sah) was assassinated in Paraguay.

In 1987, the city of Philadelphia, cradle of the US Constitution, hosted a big party to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the historic document; In a speech at Independence Hall, President Ronald Reagan hailed the framing of the Constitution as a milestone “that would profoundly and forever change not just this United States, but the world.”

In 1994, Alabama’s Heather Whitestone was crowned the first Miss America Deaf.

In 2001, six days after September 11, stock prices plunged but came to a halt before collapsing in an emotional reopening and waving Wall Street flags; the Dow Jones industrial average ended the day lower from 684.81 to 8,920.70.

Ten Years Ago: A protest called Occupy Wall Street began in New York City, sparking similar protests in the United States and around the world. Charles H. Percy, 91, a Chicago businessman turned US senator and once widely regarded as one of the top presidential candidates, has died in Washington.

Five years ago: A bomb explosion rocked Manhattan’s Chelsea neighborhood, injuring 30 people. (An American citizen born in Afghanistan was convicted of the bombing and sentenced to life in prison.)

A year ago: During a drive-thru campaign event in Pennsylvania, Democrat Joe Biden denounced President Donald Trump’s handling of the pandemic as “close to the criminal”. Marking the 233rd anniversary of the signing of the Constitution, Trump downplayed the historic legacy of slavery in the United States and criticized efforts to combat systemic racism as a source of division. Firefighter Charles Morton, a member of an elite Hotshot team, died fighting a fire in the mountains east of Los Angeles; the fire was started when a couple used a device that purported to emit blue or pink smoke to reveal the gender of their baby. Rescuers on the Florida Gulf Coast and Alabama have used boats and vehicles on the high seas to reach those isolated by the floodwaters in the wake of Hurricane Sally.

Today’s Birthdays: Senator Charles E. Grassley, R-Iowa, turns 88. Retired Supreme Court Justice David H. Souter (SOO’-tur) is 82 years old. Singer LaMonte McLemore (The Fifth Dimension) is 86 years old. Anthony Zinni is 78 years old. Basketball Hall of Fame coach Phil Jackson is 76. Singer Fee Waybill is 73 years old. Actress Cassandra Peterson (“Elvira, Mistress of the Dark”) is 70 years old. Actress Rita Rudner is 68 years old. Director-actor Paul Feig is 59 years old. Director Baz Luhrmann is 59 years old. Singer BeBe Winans is 59 years old. TV personality / businessman Robert Herjavec (TV: “Shark Tank”) is 58 years old. Actor Kyle Chandler is 56 years old. Director-producer Bryan Singer is 56 years old. Rapper Doug E. Fresh is 55 years old. Actor Malik Yoba is 54 years old. Rock singer Anastacia is 53 years old. Actor Matthew Settle is 52 years old. Rapper Vin Rock (Naughty By Nature) is 51 years old. Actor-comedian Bobby Lee is 50 years old. Actor Felix Solis is 50 years old. R&B singer Marcus Sanders (Hi-Five) is 48 years old. Actor-singer Nona Gaye is 47 years old. The singer-actor Constantine Maroulis is 46 years old. NASCAR driver Jimmie Johnson is 46 years old. r Stephen Cochran is 42 years old. Rock musician Chuck Comeau (Simple Plan) is 42 years old. Actor Billy Miller is 42 years old. Rock musician Jon Walker is 36 years old. NHL forward Alex Ovechkin (oh-VECH’-kin) is 36 years old. Actress Danielle Brooks is 32 Gospel singer Jonathan McReynolds is 32. Actor-singer Denyse Tontz is 27 years old. NHL center Auston Matthews is 24.

Copyright © 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, written or redistributed.


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U.S. Senators Dianne Feinstein, Alex Padilla and Rep. Scott Peters introduce legislation to protect Marine Corps recruit depot in San Diego, California https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/u-s-senators-dianne-feinstein-alex-padilla-and-rep-scott-peters-introduce-legislation-to-protect-marine-corps-recruit-depot-in-san-diego-california/ Thu, 16 Sep 2021 12:55:58 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/u-s-senators-dianne-feinstein-alex-padilla-and-rep-scott-peters-introduce-legislation-to-protect-marine-corps-recruit-depot-in-san-diego-california/ Recruits with Alpha Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, march during a final drill assessment at Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego Dec. 22. Drill instructors call a cadence to their platoon to keep recruits in sync with each other while marching. Each year, more than 17,000 men recruited from the Western Recruiting Region are trained […]]]>

Recruits with Alpha Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, march during a final drill assessment at Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego Dec. 22.
Drill instructors call a cadence to their platoon to keep recruits in sync with each other while marching.
Each year, more than 17,000 men recruited from the Western Recruiting Region are trained at MCRD San ​​Diego.
Photo by Lance Cpl. Jesula Jeanlouis.

September 16, 2021 – Washington – Senators Dianne Feinstein and Alex Padilla and Rep. Scott Peters (all D-Calif.) Introduced a bill on Wednesday to ban the closure of the Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego.

Following the passage of National Defense authorization law for fiscal year 2020, the Marine Corps has begun reviewing its two recruit training sites in San Diego, Calif., and Parris Island, South Carolina, for possible relocation.

The San Diego Marine Corps Recruit Depot has served as the recruit training center for the western United States since 1923, training nearly 18,000 Marines each year. In May, the base reached a new historic milestone with its first batch of female graduates, demonstrating its ability to fully integrate genders during basic training. The training mission is part of a larger presence in the region; Seven military installations are located in San Diego, including three Marine Corps bases that house nearly one-third of all active-duty Marines.

“The Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego has trained new Marines since 1923. Over the years, more than one million Marines have graduated from the program. The base has been a strategically vital location for Marines since before the Second World War and should continue to serve as such ”, Senator Feinstein said. “San Diego is home to a strong military community with a rich history of service. There is no reason to relocate this important training center.

“The San Diego Marine Corps Recruiting Depot (MCRD) represents the past, present and future of our city’s rich military history and tradition,” said Representative Peters. “This bill will protect this facility and ensure that San Diego continues to provide world-class Marines ready to fight the battles of our country.” MCRD’s location, proximity to other Marine Corps and Navy facilities, and its connection to a vibrant defense industry in the region underscore why San Diego remains an ideal location to support initial Marine Corps training. . I am honored to join Senators Feinstein and Padilla in this effort.

“California has a long and rich military history with the Marine Corps stretching back almost a century,” Senator Alex Padilla said. “Each year, the San Diego Marine Corps Recruit Depot prepares over 18,000 Marines to serve our nation in uniform. It would be a huge disservice, not only to our Marines, but to the safety of our country, to shutting down this training camp which trains and develops all recruits west of the Mississippi. I am proud to adhere to this important legislation to keep open this essential training center in San Diego. “

The full text of the legislation is available here.

The San Diego Military Advisory Council, an organization that advocates for the San Diego military community, has expressed strong support for the legislation: “The SDMAC strongly supports the Marine Corps Recruit Depot San Diego Protection Act. While SDMAC also supports the ability of our department heads to plan for many possible events, we support efforts to maintain the Marine Corps Recruit Depot (MCRD) in San Diego. “ The full letter of support from the Military Advisory Board is available here.
Source: Senator Dianne Feinstein


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AP Top News at 2:21 a.m. EDT https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/ap-top-news-at-221-a-m-edt/ Thu, 09 Sep 2021 04:00:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/ap-top-news-at-221-a-m-edt/ Posted on Wednesday, September 8, 2021 | 9:00 p.m. Updated 17 minutes ago Buried Shots and Videos, Louisiana State Police Model MONROE, Louisiana (AP) – The most violent videos have been lying around for years, lost or ignored in a digital safe. Louisiana State Police soldiers and high ranking officers often looked the other way, […]]]>

Updated 17 minutes ago

Buried Shots and Videos, Louisiana State Police Model

MONROE, Louisiana (AP) – The most violent videos have been lying around for years, lost or ignored in a digital safe. Louisiana State Police soldiers and high ranking officers often looked the other way, although officers took to official messaging channels to joke about their brutality. In one video, white soldiers can be seen slamming a black man against a police car after finding marijuana in his car, throwing him to the ground and repeatedly hitting him – all while handcuffing him. In another, a white soldier hits a black man at a traffic stop 18 times with a flashlight, leaving him with a broken jaw, broken ribs and a gash on his head.

Ida’s deaths increase by 11 in New Orleans; Louisiana Toll Now 26

HOUMA, Louisiana (AP) – The death toll in Louisiana from Hurricane Ida rose to 26 on Wednesday, after health officials reported 11 more deaths in New Orleans, mostly of elderly people who perished in because of the heat. The announcement was grim news amid signs the city was returning to normal with power almost fully restored and a nighttime curfew lifted. As New Orleans generally recovered from the storm, hundreds of thousands of people outside the city remained without power and some of the hardest hit areas still had no water. In southeast Louisiana, 250,000 students were unable to return to class 10 days after Ida roared ashore in winds of 240 km / h.

Pentagon chief: al-Qaida could attempt a return to Afghanistan

KUWAIT CITY (AP) – US Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin said on Thursday that the extremist al-Qaida group that used Afghanistan as a transit base to attack the United States 20 years ago could attempt to s’ regenerate there following a US withdrawal that left the Taliban in power. “That’s the nature of the organization,” he told a small group of reporters in Kuwait City at the end of a four-day tour of the Persian Gulf states. He said the United States was ready to prevent a return of Al-Qaida to Afghanistan that would threaten the United States. The Taliban had provided al-Qaida with sanctuary while it ruled Afghanistan from 1996 to 2001.

From COVID elections, 9/11 plots cast a long shadow

Korey Rowe has toured Iraq and Afghanistan and returned to the United States in 2004 traumatized and disillusioned. His experiences abroad and his nagging questions about September 11, 2001 convinced him that America’s leaders were lying about what happened that day and the wars that followed. The result was “Loose Change,” a 2005 documentary produced by Rowe and written and directed by his childhood friend, Dylan Avery, which popularized the theory that the US government was behind 9/11. One of the early internet viral hits while still young, it encouraged millions of people to question what they were told. As the attacks united many Americans in grief and anger, “Loose Change” spoke to the discontented.

COVID-19 surge in United States: Summer of hope ends in gloom

WASHINGTON (AP) – The summer that was supposed to mark America’s independence from COVID-19 instead ends with the United States more firmly under the tyranny of the virus, with daily deaths rising at their March level. The delta variant is filling hospitals, sickening alarmingly high numbers of children and driving coronavirus deaths in some places to the highest levels in the entire pandemic. School systems that have reopened their classrooms are suddenly reverting to distance learning due to epidemics. Legal disputes, threats and violence have erupted over mask and vaccine requirements. The death toll in the United States stands at more than 650,000, with a major forecast model projecting it to exceed 750,000 by December.

Texas man gets execution delay over pastor’s contact request

HUNTSVILLE, Texas (AP) – A Texas death row inmate was granted a stay on Wednesday night after being executed for killing a convenience store worker in a 2004 robbery that brought in $ 1.25 after claiming that the state violated his religious freedom by not letting his pastor get hold of him at the time of his lethal injection. The United States Supreme Court blocked the execution of John Henry Ramirez about three hours after he could have been executed. He is convicted of fatally stabbing Pablo Castro, 46, who worked in a convenience store in Corpus Christi. Ramirez was in a small holding cell a few feet from the Texas Death Chamber at the Huntsville Unit Jail when he was advised of the stay by the Texas Department of Criminal Justice spokesperson, Jason Clark.

North Korea parades military equipment to celebrate founding

SEOUL, South Korea (AP) – North Korea marched troopers and military equipment through its capital overnight during a nation’s 73rd birthday celebration overseen by Leader Kim Jong Un, state media reported Thursday. State television did not broadcast images of the parade on Thursday morning and the full range of weapons displayed during the event was not immediately clear. But there were indications that the parade, which North Korea said involved paramilitary and public security forces, was toned down compared to previous military parades in January and October of last year, when the North took over. deployed some of its most provocative strategic weapons threatening its Asian rivals and the American homeland.

Biden and Democrats push Civilian Climate Corps to echo New Deal

WASHINGTON (AP) – Inspired by the Civilian Conservation Corps of the New Deal era, President Joe Biden and Congress Democrats are pushing for a modern counterpart: a Civilian Climate Corps that would create hundreds of thousands of jobs by building trails, restoring streams and helping to prevent forest fire disasters. Relying on Biden’s oft-repeated comment that when he thinks of climate change he thinks of jobs, the White House said the $ 10 billion program would meet both priorities, as young adults would find work. to install solar panels, plant trees, dig irrigation ditches and stimulate outdoor recreation. “We must seize this opportunity to build a great and bold path to critical careers, for a diverse generation of Americans ready to face this existential crisis we are facing,” said Ali Zaidi, deputy climate advisor at the White House.

Confederate Statue’s 1887 Time Capsule Should Be Removed

RICHMOND, Virginia (AP) – Now that an iconic statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee has been removed from its perch above Monument Avenue in Richmond, teams plan to remove a piece of history from its pedestal gigantic. An 1887 time capsule that state officials say is tucked inside the statue’s base is due to be removed Thursday. It will be replaced with a new time capsule that contains material reflecting the current era, including an expired vial of Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine, a Black Lives Matter sticker, and a photograph of a black ballerina with her fist raised near the statue of Lee after Racial justice protests erupted over the police murder of George Floyd in Minneapolis last year.

Crushed by pandemic, conventions mount a cautious return

In the pre-COVID era, business events __ from small college conferences to giant trade shows like CES __ regularly attracted over 1 billion attendees each year. The pandemic suddenly interrupted these global gatherings, emptying convention centers and closing hotels. Over a year later, face-to-face meetings are on the rise. At the end of August, 30,000 masked participants gathered in Las Vegas for ASD Market Week, a retail trade show. In Chicago, the Black Women’s Expo recently hosted the largest event in its history, with 432 vendors and thousands of masked attendees. “People are careful, but they are happy to be able to go out and network with other people,” said Dr.


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Green lantern: who is the most powerful black lantern? https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/green-lantern-who-is-the-most-powerful-black-lantern/ Sat, 04 Sep 2021 23:36:35 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/green-lantern-who-is-the-most-powerful-black-lantern/ The Green Lantern series featured the Black Lantern Corps, created to be antithetical to the various bodies of the emotional spectrum of Nekron, one of DC’s many personifications of death. The 2009 scenario, Blackest night, saw Nekron use menacing black rings to resurrect the dead across the DC Universe, amassing an army that has blackened […]]]>

The Green Lantern series featured the Black Lantern Corps, created to be antithetical to the various bodies of the emotional spectrum of Nekron, one of DC’s many personifications of death. The 2009 scenario, Blackest night, saw Nekron use menacing black rings to resurrect the dead across the DC Universe, amassing an army that has blackened the skies, killed beloved characters and forever changed the landscape of the DC Universe as it is. was then known.

Among the ranks of the Black Lantern were some of the most powerful beings in the stars, none more powerful than the Specter, the Anti-Monitor, and Nekron himself. But who among these titans could be considered the most powerful of the dark villains?


Spectrum

Of these three characters, the Specter is perhaps the oldest character in terms of publication history, as he first appeared in the 1940s. More fun comics # 52. Created by artist Bernard Bailey and writer Jerry Seigel, the Specter was a vengeful spirit, driven to seek justice for the murder of cop Jim Corrigan, who became his host. Over the years, this mission would expand for the Specter, being written in more modern interpretations as the embodiment of the wrath of God. As such, DC’s Spirit of Vengeance is a powerful and ultimately unpredictable figure.

Over the years, the Specter has faced many hosts, although at the time of this event he was residing in Crispus Allen, a Gotham City police officer. Having already been killed and resurrected, a black ring attaches to Allen as there were other characters who had already perished and then returned. This action effectively sealed the Specter within, but allowed the Black Lantern to use the vast power of the entity. This power allowed the Specter to resist the typical means of destroying a Black Lantern (two or more lantern lights focused on a host). In order to defeat this powerhouse, Hal Jordan once again allowed himself to be possessed by Parallax, snatching the Specter from his host Black Lantern. Even though he was very powerful, the Specter was defeated by Parallax, an entity that probably could not have resisted the power of either the Anti-Monitor or Nekron.

RELATED: Specter Vs. Ghost Rider: Which Spirit of Vengeance Is Most Powerful?

The Anti-Monitor

DC original Crisis on Infinite Earths (by Marv Wolfman and George Perez) watched the villainous Anti-Monitor, an ancient anti-matter being, consume countless worlds in his cloud of anti-matter. With the combined power of hundreds of heroes across the multiverse, this divine figure has finally been defeated. As a result of this conflict, the entire history of the DC Universe would be altered and the Anti-Monitor would appear in many events as a way to escalate the conflict, even becoming a yellow lantern during the “Sinestro Corps War” , although he was apparently killed by Superboy-Prime during this event.

Possessing enough power to collapse the multiverse, Nekron uses the Anti-Monitor as a power source for his Lantern Power Battery. While most Black Lanterns are silly envelopes who act solely on Nekron’s will, the Anti-Monitor is unique in that he is not a full-fledged Black Lantern. Following a confrontation with Guy Gardner and a number of lanterns from various corps, the Anti-Monitor is killed, though his corpse is sucked into the battery to be used as a power source again. Near the fence of Darkest night, The Anti-Monitor would receive a white ring, effectively freeing it from the battery pack, even though it would still be banned into the Anti-Matter Universe by Nekron.

RELATED: Green Lantern: Sinestro Corps War Barely Stopped Alan Moore’s Ragnarok

Nekron

Among the Black Lanterns, there are none whose potency matches that of the ancestor himself. Even though he has been seen most prominently in Blackest night, Nekron, lord of the undead, first appeared in Tales of the Green Lantern Corps # 2 (by Mike W. Barr, Len Wein and Joe Staton) in 1981 as a cosmic being who gave Krona the power to fight the Guardians. He rarely appeared after this story, mostly with plots to escape the Dimension of the Unliving and find his way into the main DC Universe, these appearances only indicating the true scope of his power.

Using the Black Rings, Nekron was able to work towards his goal of consuming all living things and ultimately destroying the White Entity, the embodiment of life. Making powerful beings like the Specter and the Anti-Monitor his puppets, Nekron almost sees this plan come to fruition, but Hal Jordan’s intervention and the destruction of the power bank sees the Lord of the Undead defeated and destroyed. . Free from the influence of the Black Lantern, the Anti-Monitor likely could have defeated Nekron, but without complete control of himself and with his death at the hands of the body, the Anti-Monitor was at Nekron’s mercy. With its power increasing second by second, it’s likely that nothing but white light could have stopped Nekron.

With a new Black Lantern recently returned to the DC Universe, it is very possible that the Dark Lord of the Undying will resurrect with a new plan to bring death to all life in the universe.

KEEP READING: Infinite Frontier Gives The Black Lantern Its Own Knightmare

The Winter Hulk from Jason Aaron's Avengers Race.

Avengers puts She-Hulk on a crash course with a mighty hero


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Bonner County History – September 2, 2021 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/bonner-county-history-september-2-2021/ Thu, 02 Sep 2021 08:02:04 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/bonner-county-history-september-2-2021/ From the archives of the Bonner County History Museum 611 S. Ella Ave., Sandpoint, Idaho, 83864 208-263-2344 50 years ago Sandpoint News Bulletin Sep 2, 1971 – FAIRS ON THE RISE An estimated 13,291 people attended the Bonner County Fair in its new neighborhoods last week, about 1,000 more than for the 1970 fair. Fair […]]]>


From the archives of the

Bonner County History Museum

611 S. Ella Ave., Sandpoint, Idaho, 83864

208-263-2344

50 years ago

Sandpoint News Bulletin

Sep 2, 1971 – FAIRS ON THE RISE

An estimated 13,291 people attended the Bonner County Fair in its new neighborhoods last week, about 1,000 more than for the 1970 fair. Fair secretary Raynold Davis said everyone Everyone seemed happy with the new fair buildings and that everything had gone well for a first year.

•••

SPECTACULAR ELECTRIC STORM TUESDAY

A dramatic electrical storm accompanied by torrential rains swept through the Sandpoint-Hope-Clark Fork area between 1 and 2 a.m. Tuesday, causing scattered damage. Harlan Walker’s home in Syringa Heights was directly struck by lightning. The bolt punctured a hole in a carpet, burnt a bathroom heater, shorted the electrical system, and damaged the telephone circuit. As the storm swept across the lake, residents of the Hope area were treated to a spectacular view of lightning plying the water over a large area. The flashes were almost constant for a period of 15 minutes with a brightness so strong that you could read in the light.

•••

GUS VERDAL NAMED TOP HELP

The promotion of Gustav Verdal, Forest Supervisor of the Coeur d’Alene National Forest, to the post of Deputy Forest Supervisor of the Kaniksu National Forest is announced. Born in Sandpoint, Verdal graduated from Sandpoint High School. He served in the US Army Air Corps from March 1943 to September 1945 and received his bachelor’s degree in forest management from the U of Idaho. He began his forestry career in 1952. Verdal, his wife Mary and their three children will move to Sandpoint this week.

100 years ago

Reviews on the Pend d’Oreille

September 2, 1921 – PATENTS OF THE CITY

To alleviate a threatened water shortage in Sandpoint, the Kootenai Mill and Rotunda pump water from Pend d’Oreille Lake, leaving the water stored in the Sand Creek Gorge reservoir for residences and homes in the area. business, where pure water is a demand. The water is extremely low in the reservoir at present but is still sufficient to meet demand, and no lake water has been pumped into the network, as has been maliciously reported.

•••

MINOR MEETS DEATH AT ARMSTEAD MINE

An employee of the Armstead mine in Talache was killed in a mine accident on Monday, when he fell nearly 300 feet from a point on the main raise near the 400 foot level to the woods at the level of 700 feet. It is the theory at the mine that he was hit in the head by a falling piece of stone and that he was dead before he fell.

•••

$ 10,000 LOSS OF FIRE AT SAMUELS POLE YARD

A fire of unknown origin but supposed to have been caused by a cigarette thrown negligently last Saturday destroyed 100,000 jobs in the sites of the company Sandpoint Lumber & Pole in Samuels, as well as a small quantity of wood and some poles. The total damage caused by the fire will be between $ 10,000 and $ 12,000 according to FC Culver of the Sandpoint company. A crew of 30 men was engaged in the fight against the flames. Thanks to their efforts, 56,000 jobs were saved, along with most of the posts and most of the lumber.

For more information, visit the museum online at bonnercountyhistory.org.


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The day – No one left behind should go looking for our Afghan allies too https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/the-day-no-one-left-behind-should-go-looking-for-our-afghan-allies-too/ Sun, 29 Aug 2021 04:06:27 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/the-day-no-one-left-behind-should-go-looking-for-our-afghan-allies-too/ Watching and reading the news recently has brought back memories of Vietnam for us – not of fighting, but of a look of despair and fear. We now see it on the faces of thousands of Afghan citizens as they rush to Kabul International Airport in the hope of being whisked away from their crumbling […]]]>

Watching and reading the news recently has brought back memories of Vietnam for us – not of fighting, but of a look of despair and fear. We now see it on the faces of thousands of Afghan citizens as they rush to Kabul International Airport in the hope of being whisked away from their crumbling country and into the arms of the kind of democratic nation they are. they have been fighting to build for two decades.

Where have we seen this look before?

In April 1975, one of us was 19 and was heading to Misawa Air Force Base in northern Japan to serve as a Mandarin Chinese translator for the US Army. The other was in his mid-twenties, married and living in Norwich and having already served three years in the Marine Corps in Vietnam where he received a Silver Star for “outstanding bravery” in combat.

That month, reports about the Saigon evacuation were everywhere on television, in newspapers and on the radio. Almost everyone remembers the photo of the CIA officer helping evacuees climb a ladder to board a waiting helicopter flying over 22 Gia Long Street, which was a hotel about half a mile from the United States Embassy. It was a heartbreaking scene.

Fewer people remember the story of Francis Terry McNamara, the consul general of the town of Can-Tho, about 160 kilometers from Saigon, who was ordered to evacuate 18 Americans but demanded that he also rescues hundreds of Vietnamese citizens loyal to America – which he was allowed to do, but only by sea, not by helicopter. McNamara requisitioned barges, descended a tributary of the Mekong Delta, survived rocket fire from the Viet Cong, and plunged into the ocean for a few hours before being picked up by a CIA-chartered freighter.

One of those saved by McNamara was 3-year-old Anne Pham. She then became an American foreign service officer.

“By saving me on that fateful day, they sowed the seeds of strength and hope that helped me realize my dream of working for the State Department,” Pham later told US officials. “Although I am the product of a painful chapter in history, I am also a product of America’s greatness, with its diverse society, democratic ideals and opportunities for all.

Now, in August 2021, psychologically, we and other military veterans are back on the roof of 22 Gia Long Street. We think a lot of America is too.

In 2009 – nearly a decade after the start of our war in Afghanistan – Congress created what is known as a “special immigrant visa” to provide refuge for Afghans who had worked with Americans as an immigrant. interpreters, translators and advisers. It was a way of recognizing the service of our allies in the country and helping to save those who might be targeted by the Taliban for helping the United States. Afghan security forces, government officials, journalists, judges, students, women’s rights defenders – they are all potential targets of retaliation.

These are the people who need our help. Of course, we need to get all US citizens back, and we think we will. But it’s a sad reality that the battlefields of war are filled with all kinds of rubbish and loss: minefields, shell casings, MRE packaging, bottled water, boots, keyless jeeps. And human beings. It happened in Saigon. It happened with the Kurds. And this is happening again right now in Afghanistan.

We cannot leave behind the human capital that has accompanied us. It is imperative that we change our long-standing national policy of leaving behind those who have helped us. We are not making a political statement about the 20 year war in Afghanistan and how it ends. We all have our own opinions, and this topic will be debated in many forums as we seek to share both praise and blame.

What we will say is that as Americans return home to a grateful country, many of the people who have helped us are fleeing their homes, leaving behind clothes, furniture, bank accounts, businesses, as well as their hopes and dreams for a better future in their home country, Afghanistan.

If the lessons of Vietnam and other wars have taught us anything, it is that we must save and welcome as many of these Afghan allies as possible. We must not leave behind the men and women who stood by our side and risked their lives and the lives of their families to serve America and our ideals of freedom, democracy and human rights. Somewhere in that crowd is another Anne Pham, another future American citizen who is waiting to do great things for the country she cherishes and befriended. Don’t let them down.

Cathy Osten, D-Sprague, is a United States Army veteran and the Democratic State Senator for the 19th Senate District. Harold Tucker Braddock of Norwich spent three years in Vietnam with the US Marine Corps.


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