Hamline Committee – Hamline Midway History http://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 21:59:53 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/hamline-midway-history-icon-150x150.jpg Hamline Committee – Hamline Midway History http://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/ 32 32 From admission to discipline and the choices we make between the two https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/from-admission-to-discipline-and-the-choices-we-make-between-the-two/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 21:47:25 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/from-admission-to-discipline-and-the-choices-we-make-between-the-two/ One of the biggest fears of 3Ls, in addition to failing the bar exam, is failing the character and fitness assessment for bar admission. This requirement may well be a reason why those in law school who have already graduated are reluctant to seek mental health services for fear of being rejected on these grounds. […]]]>

One of the biggest fears of 3Ls, in addition to failing the bar exam, is failing the character and fitness assessment for bar admission. This requirement may well be a reason why those in law school who have already graduated are reluctant to seek mental health services for fear of being rejected on these grounds. And if that’s the case, even for a law student or law school graduate, that’s one too many.

The Blog Legal Profession reports on two amendments considered by the Supreme Court of Ohio.

Currently, the fitness assessment consists of determining whether there is “evidence of mental or psychological disorder which in any way affects or, if left untreated, could affect the candidate’s ability to perform competently and professionally”. The proposed rule change would remove that from a long list of factors when considering character and suitability for admission. A good first step which hopefully other jurisdictions will follow. For too long, getting help for any reason at any time, mental health issues have been seen as a sign of weakness, both before bar admission and after admission. . Too many deaths by suicide, so many cases of depression and addiction, and other mental health issues may change that view, or at least spark a long overdue realization. Not a moment too soon.

Another change proposed by the Supreme Court of Ohio is to add as prohibited criteria to the consideration of fitness to practice “gender, sexual orientation and marital status”. Existing prohibited criteria already include age, race, color, national origin and religion. Good idea to expand the prohibitions since, since I didn’t know that any of the ones listed had anything to do with the ability to practice law.

Maybe, just maybe, our profession needs to open our eyes to the possibility that good lawyers, those who make a positive difference in society, can come from all kinds of backgrounds and not just the traditional go to college, go to law school, pass the bar, and start practicing wherever you can get a job. There are those who have been incarcerated, graduated from law school, passed the bar and are practicing.

Maureen Oyenlobi, who is serving a life sentence, begins this fall at Mitchell Hamline’s ABA-approved online law school. Convicted under Minnesota’s felony murder rule, her appeals have been repeatedly denied despite the shooter only being sentenced to 40 years and eligible for parole. Disparity of sentences according to sex? No, the criminal murder rule is apparently in play here. I would bet that Oyenlobi will have a better understanding of the Constitution than some others.

Did anyone watch the testimony of John Eastman, if you can call it that, before the House January 6 committee investigators? He invoked the Fifth Amendment dozens of times and apparently asked Rudy Giuliani to see if the incumbent president would consider him for a pardon. Excuse me. Eastman’s transformation from an exuberant “let’s go” rah-rah on Jan. 6, 2021, to a schlubby-looking dude sitting next to his attorney during his testimony was a study in contrasts. Perhaps he realized while testifying that he now had a lounge chair on the Titanic. Eastman was apparently taken down by our former prez. Don’t worry, you are not the first to be treated like this and probably not the last. Just ask other lawyers whom Trump has treated similarly over time. Does the name Rudy Giulani come to mind?

Has anyone ever told Eastman that a lawyer shouldn’t get involved in client mishigas? You defend the client’s position (if and only if it is based on the law or a reasonable extension of it and you are still concerned about the possibility of penalties under Rule 11). Where has Eastman been for ten years? Didn’t he know or shouldn’t he have assumed that the words the former prez saw were “what’s in it for me?”

I’m always amused, if that’s the right word (and I’m not sure it is), that people who think they can trash the Constitution when it serves their purposes are the first to claim rights (like the Fifth, and I’m looking at you, Eastman) when needed. It’s like the person who kills both his parents and asks the court for mercy because he is an orphan.

The California State Bar is investigating Eastman. With any luck, he’ll be listed in the State Bar’s bad boy gallery, along with Tom Girardi and Michael Avenatti. And please don’t tell me that’s SoCal water these guys drank. We do not have it.

Given the moving testimony of the disgusting and unwarranted harassment of the two Georgia election volunteers, there is no golden rule in Trumpland, nor would I expect there to be, and there is no shame in using the tactics available. on the theory that the end justifies the means. As bad as Girardi and Avenatti’s conduct was, I hope the State Bar will disbar Eastman for his conduct in trying to overturn the Constitution to accommodate one man’s rapacious needs. If not struck out, the oath we all took to uphold the Constitution will have been meaningless.


old lady lawyer elderly woman grandma grandma laptopJill Switzer has been an active member of the California State Bar for over 40 years. She remembers practicing law in a kinder, gentler time. She’s had a diverse legal career, including stints as an assistant district attorney, solo practice, and several high-profile in-house gigs. She’s now a full-time mediator, which gives her the opportunity to see dinosaurs, millennials, and those in between interact — it’s not always civil. You can reach her by email at oldladylawyer@gmail.com.

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LLC, Direct or Derivative Claims and Ad Hoc Litigation Committees: A Lively Debate | Farrell Fritz, PC https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/llc-direct-or-derivative-claims-and-ad-hoc-litigation-committees-a-lively-debate-farrell-fritz-pc/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 20:21:53 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/llc-direct-or-derivative-claims-and-ad-hoc-litigation-committees-a-lively-debate-farrell-fritz-pc/ The current problem of The business lawyer, a quarterly publication of the ABA’s Business Law Section that aptly bills itself as “the nation’s premier business law journal,” features a duel pair of articles of great interest to scholars. , practitioners and other students of the limited liability company. The authors of the articles, whom I […]]]>

The current problem of The business lawyer, a quarterly publication of the ABA’s Business Law Section that aptly bills itself as “the nation’s premier business law journal,” features a duel pair of articles of great interest to scholars. , practitioners and other students of the limited liability company. The authors of the articles, whom I had the good fortune to know during the annual meetings of the LLC Institute and who have guests posted on this blog (here and here) and spoke on my podcast (here), are among the nation’s leading authorities on closed business entities and, in particular, unincorporated entities, including partnerships and LLCs.

I’m talking about Donald J. Weidner (pictured left), Dean Emeritus and former Centennial Professor at Florida State University College of Law, and Daniel S. Kleinberger (pictured right), Professor Emeritus of Law at Mitchell Hamline School of Law. Law.

Among his many accomplishments outside of academia, Dean Weidner is co-author of The Revised Uniform Partnerships Act published by Thomson Reuters, was rapporteur for the Revised Uniform Partnerships Act (1994) and has written numerous articles on partnerships, limited liability companies and financial accounting (SSRN author page here).

Professor Kleinberger’s extracurricular contributions are no less impressive, including co-author of a leading treatise on limited liability companies published by Warren Gorham & Lamont, co-rapporteur and lead editor of legislative text and commentary officials on the Revised Limited Liability Companies Act (2006), and author of numerous articles in journals and law journals (SSRN author page here).

As any long-time reader of this blog knows, and as I wrote not long agoone of the most common issues debated early in corporate divorce litigation involving LLCs as well as private corporations are motions to dismiss direct claims by a minority member against executives who allegedly had to be carried in a derivative way under the law in force. Tools test of direct claims against derived claims. The two articles by Dean Weidner and Professor Kleinberger offer a lively debate between two schools of thought regarding the ability of LLC members to pursue and obtain effective remedies for wrongful claims against LLC officers, in the form of direct or derivative claims, and the ability (or not) of the conflicting LLC officers to gain control of those claims through the appointment of a substitute Special Litigation Committee (SLC) once the claims are qualified as direct (no SLC) or derived (yes SLC).

Article by Dean Weidner

Dean Weidner’s article, titled, The unfortunate role of special litigation committees in LLCs (available here), offers a scathing critique of what he calls “the imposition of derivative litigation complexities ‘derived from derivative public company law’ on limited liability companies [that] imposes significant transaction costs that cannot be allocated and are generally of no use.

Among other critics, acknowledging that the most common claims of manager misconduct lend themselves to characterization as derivative rather than direct, Dean Weidner takes aim at what he calls a misguided departure from the Revised Uniform LLC Act. 2006 to the partnership precepts of its 1996 ancestor by its importation of the direct derivative dichotomy and the ability for LLC managers to appoint Special Litigation Committees (SLCs) “to decide how to dispose of derivative claims “. This “dramatic reversal” from the original 1996 law – which he said created a set of default rules tailored to “small entrepreneurs” giving “easy access ‘to members’ remedies’ – in favor of the RULLCA’s adoption of the “large corporation model of derivative litigation”, has “severely restricted members’ rights to sue directly, while locking in their economic interests”.

His solution? Legislatures should amend their LLC statutes to allow LLCs to “join” the derivative litigation mechanism, rather than forcing them to “opt out,” or even exempting closely held LLCs from litigation restrictions If legislatures balk at such solutions, he writes, courts should move away from the “more lenient standard of review” of SLC decisions, including the decision of the New York Court of Appeals in Auerbach versus Bennett (1979) is paradigmatic, “essentially treating the SLC as exercising the business judgment of the entire board and deferring[ring] to that. Instead, he suggests, courts should follow Delaware’s lead in Zapata Corp. against Maldonado (Del. Sup. Ct. 1981) and In re Oracle Corp. Derivative dispute (Del Ch. 2003) by imposing a stricter and less deferential standard of review for SLC determinations and a “more onerous requirement of SLC independence that requires neutrality with respect to a wide variety of personal and social factors in addition to the factors economic”.

Reply from Professor Kleinberger

Professor Kleinberger’s counterpoint article, entitled The direct-derivative distinction, the special litigation commission and the uniform act: a response to Professor Weidner (available here), mounts a vigorous rebuttal of what he calls the “two key premises” underlying Dean Weidner’s arguments:. The first is that RULLCA “has deserted its appropriate target group”, a criticism which Professor Kleinberger writes, “misunderstands the evolution of uniform limited liability company laws”. The second is that RULLCA “destroyed a member’s easy access to legal remedies”, which Professor Kleinberger says understates both the remedies instituted by RULCCA regarding minority members, including the adding a judicial dissolution remedy for oppressive majority conduct, and erroneously postulates that the courts should put an inch heavier on the side of the scale for the aggrieved member of the minority. As Professor Kleinberger puts it, “some plaintiffs should win, and some certainly shouldn’t”.

After challenging the two assigned premises, Professor Kleinberger’s paper goes on to challenge what he classifies as Dean Weidner’s four main arguments:

  • First, Professor Kleinberger argues a number of “flaws” in Dean Weidner’s “direct derivative distinction attack”, including his disagreement with Dean Weidner’s arguments that the distinction “unduly channels claims of violation of the operating agreement” in the derived category and that the status of the LLC” as a separate entity from its owners is irrelevant to the existence hell no of the direct derived distinction.
  • Second, Professor Kleinberger takes issue with what he describes as “Dean Weidner’s attack on SLCs by linking SLCs to [the Uniform Law Commission’s] calamitous recognition of the direct derived distinction” in RULLCA (2006). Writes Professor Kleinberger, “The SLC reflects and results from basic governance principles applicable to any business entity defined as a legal person distinct from its owners”.
  • Third, Professor Kleinberger defends RULLCA’s endorsement of the standard for reviewing SLC decisions set out in Auerbach on the “minority point of view” expressed in Zapata, describing Delaware case law on the issue as “notoriously unstable and demanding.”[ing] ongoing study,” and doubting the persuasiveness of the empirical evidence cited by Dean Weidner suggesting that SLCs are biased in favor of management.
  • Fourth, Professor Kleinberger argues that RULLCA § 805 and its commentaries do not deserve criticism as setting a lax standard for the independence and disinterestedness of SLC members, and at odds with the fact that “disputed decision-makers should be irrefutably presumed incapable of appointing independent and disinterested persons”. surrogates, especially when the conflicting decision makers know that a court will scrutinize appointees for their independence and disinterestedness.

Let me be the first to admit that my summaries above barely scratch the surface of the scholarly professors’ carefully sculpted arguments and supporting documents cited for each. In this relatively short post I cannot do justice to their scholarship and for that I apologize to Dean Weidner and Professor Kleinberger. To my readers, all I can say is, read the articles, you will learn a lot.

The view from the trenches

I guess my own views on the subject of LLCs, Direct Derivative Distinction, and SLCs are heavily influenced by decades of litigation experience handling corporate divorce cases involving primarily businesses run by their member, owner-operated and family-owned, as opposed to large corporations. , capital-intensive, manager-run LLCs with both active owners and passive investors (the latter type is more like a Delaware LLC litigating in the Delaware Chancery Court). This is what I sometimes call the “Two worlds of SARLwhich, for better or worse, exist under the same set of default statutory rules.

Large, highly capitalized LLCs, more like the corporate model with different ownership classes and centralized management, also tend to have better access to sophisticated legal advice conducive to the conclusion of well-tailored and fully-fledged operating agreements. negotiated rules that can vary fail to suit the needs and desires of the company and its shareholders, including carefully crafted provisions for dispute resolution. Not so much in the world of smaller LLCs more like the partnership model in their management and less likely to benefit from a well-crafted operating agreement and therefore likely more dependent on statutory rules by default. Also, I almost never see the appointment of an SLC in such cases.

In other words, in my view, Dean Weidner’s views speak more pragmatically to the world of the smaller LLC, while Professor Kleinberger’s views speak more pragmatically to the world of the larger LLC. Is there an overlap between these two worlds? Sure.

Anyway, insofar as we have judges who understand the differences between these two worlds and the ramifications of these differences, I for one am not very concerned about the ability of our courts to reach fair decisions in cases involving disputes between LLC members of all kinds and sizes.

[View source.]

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‘A very seedy form of quid-pro-quo’: U of M regent slammed for seeking UMD chancellorship https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/a-very-seedy-form-of-quid-pro-quo-u-of-m-regent-slammed-for-seeking-umd-chancellorship/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 04:07:52 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/a-very-seedy-form-of-quid-pro-quo-u-of-m-regent-slammed-for-seeking-umd-chancellorship/ A regent on the University of Minnesota’s Board of Regents has resigned from the board to apply for a position as chancellor within the university system, 5 EYEWITNESS NEWS has learned. On Tuesday afternoon, Dave McMillan delivered a letter to Governor Tim Walz announcing his resignation from the Board of Regents with the intention of […]]]>

A regent on the University of Minnesota’s Board of Regents has resigned from the board to apply for a position as chancellor within the university system, 5 EYEWITNESS NEWS has learned.

On Tuesday afternoon, Dave McMillan delivered a letter to Governor Tim Walz announcing his resignation from the Board of Regents with the intention of applying for the interim position of chancellor at the University of Minnesota Duluth.

“My reason for resigning is to pursue another important and very consequential leadership opportunity on the University campus closest and dearest to me, UMD,” McMillan said. “I intend to formally apply for the position before the June 15 deadline.”

Last December, McMillan voted to approve a 30% pay raise for U of M president Joan Gabel, which included a base salary of around $700,000 and could pay up to 1.2 million dollars in the last year of his contract.

McMillan also voted last week to pass Gabel’s budget, which included a 3.5% tuition hike for students.

Gabel will appoint the next UMD Chancellor, who will then need to be approved by the Board of Regents. The UMD Chancellor’s current salary is approximately $310,000.

Former Minnesota Governor Arne Carlson told 5 EYEWITNESS NEWS that he was not in favor of McMillan’s nomination because it looked like a conflict of interest.

“I am stunned. Completely dumbfounded. I can’t believe anyone is part of this kind of arrangement,” Carlson said. “It seems like a very seedy form of quid-pro-quo. And it gave the university a black eye, and it needs to be investigated. It seems like a very severe.

Rep. Brian Daniels, R-Faribault, is a member of the House Higher Education Committee. He told KSTP that McMillan’s resignation and subsequent candidacy for the UMD position were worth considering.

“I was a little surprised. Shocked a bit. I don’t think there’s anything illegal about what they’re offering, but it doesn’t bode well for the University of Minnesota,” Daniels said. “Admittedly, the optics are bad. And I don’t like the optics at all. I don’t like the way it’s going.

Hamline University law professor David Schultz said McMillan’s appointment raises questions about fairness in the UMD’s search for a new chancellor.

“It creates the possibility of a conflict of interest because McMillan has a relationship with Chairman Gabel that other candidates might not have,” Schultz said. “And he also has a relationship with the Board of Regents which, put together, could give him an inside track on the job.”

KSTP has asked President Gabel for comment, but a U of M spokeswoman said she could not arrange an interview on Wednesday.

McMillan told KSTP that his resignation letter speaks for itself and that he declined an interview request. He said he had done nothing wrong and was just trying to help UMD because they were struggling to find a new leader, and he was ready to take the interim job. to help with research.

Editor’s note: The on-air version of this story stated that “State Legislature Approves Multibillion-Dollar US Funding”. This is an error; the Legislature approves funding for the University of Minnesota’s multi-billion dollar budget. We apologize for this error.

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Donna M. Moncrief Obituary – Sheboygan Press Media https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/donna-m-moncrief-obituary-sheboygan-press-media/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 14:15:13 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/donna-m-moncrief-obituary-sheboygan-press-media/ Donna M. Moncrief, loving wife, mother, grandmother and great-grandmother was called to be with her Heavenly Father on June 11, 2022. She was born on August 10, 1929 in St. Paul, MN, daughter of the late Albert and Margaret (Ringtone) Wann. On February 4, 1956, she married William C. Moncrief. They moved to Sheboygan in […]]]>

Donna M. Moncrief, loving wife, mother, grandmother and great-grandmother was called to be with her Heavenly Father on June 11, 2022. She was born on August 10, 1929 in St. Paul, MN, daughter of the late Albert and Margaret (Ringtone) Wann. On February 4, 1956, she married William C. Moncrief. They moved to Sheboygan in 1965. Donna went to school in St. Paul, MN. She graduated from Hamline University St. Paul, MN in 1952 with an RN, BSN with graduate studies at the University of Minnesota and Wisconsin. She has worked as an LTC instructor, registered nurse, head nurse, clinical coordinator, division supervisor, and assistant director of nursing at various hospitals in Minnesota and Wisconsin. His last job was Director of Education at Sheboygan Memorial Hospital. She has served on local and state level committees in nursing education. She has written and published teaching materials for nursing and patient education. She was a member of the Bethlehem Lutheran Church and participated in the choir, the Fellowship Club, the Mother’s Club and led home Bible classes. Donna’s interests and hobbies included calligraphy, dressmaking, tailoring, knitting, tatting and crocheting. She made rosemary on wood and textiles. She painted flowers, birds and animals on porcelain. She enjoyed collecting antique colored glass and loved to travel. She was a wealth of knowledge. Donna knew the answer to almost everything and enjoyed debating what she knew on any topic. Donna is survived by her four daughters, Mary (Bob) Irish of Sheboygan, Ruth Moncrief of Sheboygan, Judith (Thomas) James of Terra Haute, IN, and Beth Moncrief (fiancé Riley Sutton) of Plover, WI. Additionally, she was blessed with five grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. His grandchildren and great-grandchildren brought him great joy and were the spark of his life, Jonathan (Kelly) Irish, Eoin and Grady from Sheboygan, Sarah (Ryan) Bedroske, Nolan, Samuel and Lilliana from Germantown, WI, Melissa (Joshua) Virant, Jaxon, Griffin and Maverick from Sheboygan, Emily James from St. Paul, MN and Taylor James from Nashville, TN. She was predeceased by her parents, her husband William in 1992, her brother Russell (Janice) Wann and her sister Margaret (John) Ellavsky. A private celebration of his life will be held at Bethlehem Lutheran Church in Sheboygan. She will be buried in the Lutheran Cemetery. Memorials are appreciated for the Bethlehem Lutheran Church at the Grant-In-Aid Endowment Fund. The family would like to thank everyone who has provided loving care to Donna over the past few years.

Posted on June 15, 2022

Posted in The Sheboygan Press

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The real ‘political theatre’ was orchestrated by the former president himself – Twin Cities https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/the-real-political-theatre-was-orchestrated-by-the-former-president-himself-twin-cities/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 08:33:17 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/the-real-political-theatre-was-orchestrated-by-the-former-president-himself-twin-cities/ The real “political theater” As I watched the Commission’s first televised deliberations on January 6, I was vividly reminded of the chaos and lawless behavior that took place that day in our nation’s capital… “the people’s house”. Now, some members of the Republican Party are accusing the committee of staging “political theater” and using the […]]]>

The real “political theater”

As I watched the Commission’s first televised deliberations on January 6, I was vividly reminded of the chaos and lawless behavior that took place that day in our nation’s capital… “the people’s house”.

Now, some members of the Republican Party are accusing the committee of staging “political theater” and using the events that took place to create “political advantage”. What I saw during the presentation was evidence based on facts, not speculation or one individual’s opinion. I have seen video recordings of violence and destruction, and I have seen recordings of numerous members of the former president’s staff, cabinet and family trying unsuccessfully to reason with him and convince him that he had lost a fair and honest election, and imploring him to do what he could to end the attack on the capital.

In my opinion, the real “political theater” was orchestrated by the former president himself… a person who was not man enough to accept a net electoral loss (of 7 million votes), a person who exhausted all legal options available to him, seeing his more than 60 appeals dismissed by the courts, and a man who ended up using his vice president, Mike Pence, as a scapegoat, and who continues to this day his charade of a “stolen election”.

Mike Miller, Lakeland

An alternative to demolishing a historic library building

The recent announcement by the Saint Paul Public Library of its plan to demolish the historic Hamline Midway Library in favor of a brand new building represents another step backwards for the city of Saint Paul. If upheld, this decision will not only violate the city’s own comprehensive plan to preserve St. Paul’s historic building inventory, but will result in the release of embodied carbon into the atmosphere far beyond the benefits that will be obtained by a new sustainable building.

Fortunately, there is an alternative to this destructive path, one proposed by design firm LSE Architects who will preserve and renovate the current Hamline Midway Library building, achieving a rare ‘win-win’ for those who love our libraries and those who appreciate Saint-Paul’s built environment.

Protecting an iconic building that has helped anchor the surrounding neighborhood over the past 90 years is integral to maintaining the historic character of Hamline Midway. Public structures, like the old Henry Hale Memorial Library, are owned by the community, and demolition should never be on the table just because a building in good condition has been neglected and needs repairs and upgrades. typical.

A thoughtful renovation and expansion of the current library will not only properly address equity and access, but it is also the most sensible way to protect the environment, maintain the dwindling number of historic buildings in Saint-Paul and meet the needs of 21st century customers. and staff.

Tom Goldstein, Hamline-Midway
The author is a lawyer, former member of the Saint-Paul School Board and former candidate for mayor.

Let the states decide

I am pro-choice.

I feel like ending a pregnancy is very sad; however, I also believe there is a greater good served when a young woman avoids an unwanted pregnancy. The Supreme Court may soon think otherwise.

The real problem seems to revolve around the fact that the Roe vs. Wade decision of 50 years ago didn’t fix anything…it only made things worse. Why? Because 40% of the country is pro-choice, believing like me. Another 40% are pro-life, believing abortion to be murder. The remaining 20% ​​falls somewhere in between. As a result, almost 50% of people in the country feel they have no say in the abortion issue. Very sad indeed.

The US Constitution states that rights not listed in the document should be left to the states to decide. Knocking Roe down against Wade will do just that. The people of each state will decide whether abortion is allowed or not.

I believe this is the right decision for our country; this can finally settle things once and for all.

Douglas McMillan, Hudson

Best uses for this ammo factory land

Ramsey County is showing its true colors again with its latest rejection of plans by Arden Hills and a former munitions factory developer – Rice Creek Commons. The county is outright asking for more density while telling the city and its residents that they don’t want to negatively impact traffic or our suburban feel.

Commissioner Frethem suggests that if the town just increased density like a development in Rosemount is doing, then they would be happy. This suggestion is in direct contradiction to the previous statement about not wanting to push the negative effects. Commissioner Frethem is supposed to represent the wishes and desires of our district. What does a development in Dakota County have to do with us? Frethem says county taxpayers have already invested $40 million in this land and we deserve a return on our investment.

This is where the overall problem lies. A government entity is not a revenue-generating business and should never attempt to be one or play property developer.

The county is simply looking to maximize its tax base and that is why it wants more density. They don’t care about the negative impacts on traffic or the loss of the suburban feel of our neighborhoods. Why would they, they don’t have to live next door? Their focus on balance sheets and taxation is tedious and reflects how out of touch and uncooperative the county is against its citizens.

For my part, I hope that the earth will never be developed. We have the problem of wanting to build on every last square inch of land – and why? This is because government has become so expensive that without an endless and growing stream of taxation, it simply cannot afford to function.

Arden Hills should buy the land back from the county, better yet, the county should return the land to the farming families who were driven out at the start of World War II. Or in a better use of the land altogether, it should be turned into a new national cemetery for our fallen heroes. Fort Snelling and Little Falls National Cemeteries are nearly full. This is an appropriate use for an old munitions factory.

Hans Molenaar, Shoreview

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Renovating 1558 heartbroken by SPPL decision to demolish Hamline Midway Library https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/renovating-1558-heartbroken-by-sppl-decision-to-demolish-hamline-midway-library/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 22:06:24 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/renovating-1558-heartbroken-by-sppl-decision-to-demolish-hamline-midway-library/ by Jonathan Oppenheimer, Tom Goldstein and Bonnie Youngquist Renovate 1558 is heartbroken by the decision of the St. Paul Public Library (SPPL) to demolish the historic Hamline Midway Library, a choice that unnecessarily divides our neighborhood by demolishing a city-owned building in good condition. Although the Hamline Midway Coalition Board requested that this decision be […]]]>

by Jonathan Oppenheimer, Tom Goldstein and Bonnie Youngquist

Renovate 1558 is heartbroken by the decision of the St. Paul Public Library (SPPL) to demolish the historic Hamline Midway Library, a choice that unnecessarily divides our neighborhood by demolishing a city-owned building in good condition. Although the Hamline Midway Coalition Board requested that this decision be put on hold to allow for a robust community engagement process, the St. Paul Public Library administration and Mayor Carter’s office ignored these calls. and precipitated this decision. The district was led to believe that this was a fair, thorough and transparent process, but by all accounts it was not: SPPL made an initial CIB decision after a meeting in line ; then did no sensitization for 11 months; made a final decision 3 months into a 7-month engagement process in 2022, after only 2 in-person meetings that did not allow for debate and discussion in front of community members; while sending out a single, highly biased public survey that did not allow respondents to note a preference for preservation, and refusing to publish the more than 200 comments from that survey. Along the way, SPPL convened a hand-picked group of project ambassadors, refused to make their meetings public, and rejected several calls to seat a committee member who supported preservation. And almost every public statement from SPPL over the past 3 months has refused to acknowledge the huge support for preservation – as if we don’t exist.

Clearly the neighborhood never had a fair choice: SPPL clearly intended to demolish the library from day one, despite clear majority support for preservation, as evidenced by the city’s CIB survey l last year, when 69% of respondents said renovation was a high or very high priority; by CIB letters from the public in favor of preservation outweighing those for demolition four to one; by the thousands signing a change.org petition to preserve the library; and by no organized support for the demolition. Given SPPL’s ​​stated commitment to adhere to the IAP2 policies that SPPL would do what the people decide, this decision goes against the fair process that the community deserves and that SPPL has promised.

It is simply not true that demolition is the “sustainable” option: architects around the world agree that the greenest building is the one already built, given the carbon embodied in existing buildings. A singular focus on operational carbon ignores this important fact, which means that at a time when we face a global climate crisis, we are making the environmentally unfriendly decision. This choice signals a clear lack of leadership in environmental sustainability. Additionally, demolishing a historic building, which has been deemed eligible for National Historic Designation, is directly against the guidelines of the City’s Comprehensive Plan and our District Council’s Neighborhood Plan guidelines regarding preservation. All to obtain a building barely 30% larger than the current one.

One of the main arguments in favor of demolishing the library and building a new one is that it is a “fair” decision. Yet, SPPL has never defined the parameters they use to process equity; the current inequalities they see existing in our library; how a new building will address these inequalities; or what background work they did to come to these conclusions. It is unfair to everyone, especially the most marginalized members of our community, to simply use “equity” as a meaningless buzzword. It is true that currently people with reduced mobility cannot easily enter the current building through the front door, which is why LSE’s “Option A” design held such promise as a winner -winner for our neighborhood, as it offered a carefully designed ramp to allow for access for those who currently cannot enter from the front. We believe this option answered the only clearly defined question of fairness, as it relates to accessibility.

LSE Architects presented a clear win-win for the neighborhood with their renovation and expansion option, which provided more space and better accessibility for people with reduced mobility – but SPPL never wavered in its resolve. to demolish this building senseless, no matter how clear the opposition to this option. If the director of the SPPL library and the mayor’s office wanted a new building, they always had the choice to build new somewhere else, and they still have that option. This would allow a new buyer to come in and occupy a beautiful building that has been loved by community members for 90 years and would add a lot of character to the Hamline-Midway neighborhood. There is no evidence that SPPL ever took this option seriously, despite years of citizen engagement to come up with different versions of it, instead they rejected it at every turn stating that it was just too much. complicated or expensive. We will never know because it has never been explored with any seriousness.

We hope SPPL will listen to the thousands of neighbors who support preservation; to our District Council, who thoughtfully asked for a postponement of this decision; and to Historic St. Paul, East Side Freedom Library, and the Minnesota Chapter of the Society of Architectural Historians, all of which support the preservation of the library building. We hope that SPPL defers its final decision until at least August 16, when the National Register of Historic Places reviews its addition, as such a designation will cement this building’s place in history and make it eligible for building credits. tax that can be used to renovate it in the future. We hope SPPL reconsiders its decision in light of its commitment to let the people decide the fate of the building, a commitment that has been ignored at every turn over the past 15 months.

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Black and Latino parents weigh in https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/black-and-latino-parents-weigh-in/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 20:57:33 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/black-and-latino-parents-weigh-in/ After 19 students and two teachers were killed at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas on May 24, schools across the country sent condolences and messages about the safety measures they were taking in response to the shootout. One measure was to add police to school buildings in the days following the shooting, which some […]]]>

After 19 students and two teachers were killed at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas on May 24, schools across the country sent condolences and messages about the safety measures they were taking in response to the shootout.

One measure was to add police to school buildings in the days following the shooting, which some school leaders said would increase security. But for some parents of color, inviting law enforcement into school buildings in response to a shooting isn’t comforting, it’s worrisome.

Four black parents told Education Week that they were concerned about police presence in schools because they feared their children would at the very least be stressed and anxious around the police or, in the worst case scenario, criminalized by the police. ‘school. However, two Latino parents offered a different approach to increasing the police presence at school. They said they believed the officers would contribute to the overall safety of the students and that they were not worried about their children being targeted or profiled by the police.

All parents, however, agreed on one point: more mental health support for students would benefit their children and would be overall effective in helping to prevent school violence.

“I think the biggest problem with the police in schools is that it’s reactionary,” said Shane Paul Neil, a black parent of a 9-year-old boy and a 13-year-old girl from Montclair, NJ.

A day after Uvalde’s shooting, he discovered on social media that Gov. Phil Murphy had ordered law enforcement to increase police presence at all schools in New Jersey.

“So the idea of ​​the police being there is really to give a false sense of security to those who feel like they’re doing something for them,” Neil said.

Khulia Pringle, a black parent from Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota Region, works with several national organizations, including Dignity in Schools, to get rid of police in schools. A former teacher and current activist, she advocated for the removal of ORS from schools in Minneapolis and St. Paul (something districts did in 2020 after the police killing of George Floyd in that community sparked protests in across the country).

“For years, black and brown parents have been asking for police-free schools, and when we speak up, our voices go unheard,” she said. “But when other people speak, their voices are heard and their voices are raised, and the consequences are these knee-jerk reactionary policies that ultimately affect people who are already oppressed.”

Khulia Pringle

Parents have questions about effectiveness

It’s unclear whether adding police to schools that currently don’t have them or increasing the number of them to schools that do can prevent the shootings. In Uvalde, police were on campus when the shooter killed 21 people in two classrooms. Despite audible gunshots and multiple 911 calls, the shooter spent more than an hour inside the school while police stayed outside the room where he was barricaded, according to the New York Times.

In light of the Uvalde shooting, several national organizations working to remove police from public schools held a press conference this week to discuss the growing evidence that for students of color in particular, concerns related to the presence of police in schools outweigh the benefits.

“School police do not protect students. They don’t prevent or end school shootings,” Ashley Sawyer, senior counsel for the Advancement Project, a national civil rights organization, said at the press conference.

“We cannot keep going back to the knee-jerk reactionary response of more policing. So we have to go back to what works,” she continued. “And we know it creates a positive school climate and invests vigorously in the kinds of supports young people need to feel safe, whole, affirmed and supported in their school environment.”

The Uvalde shooting is not the first time that delayed action by law enforcement failed to stop an attacker from killing people in a school building. NPR reported that the Uvalde police response is reminiscent of that of law enforcement in past mass shootings, including the 1999 shootings at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colorado, and Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida , in 2018.

The broader conversation about the role of school resource officers – police officers assigned to schools – and their contribution to keeping schools safe has also been much debated across the country since the death of George Floyd in 2020. Two studies conducted last year by researchers from Hamline University and Minnesota Metropolitan State University and the University of Albany found that school resource officers did not necessarily prevent school shootings. The University of Albany study found that while ORS was effective in reducing some types of violence, its presence in schools also intensified suspensions, expulsions, referrals to police, and arrests of students and that black students were more than twice as likely to encounter these forms. discipline than white students.

“If I wasn’t a mother of color, and my kids didn’t have the stigma of being black, and they were the majority, I don’t think [police in schools] would make me uncomfortable,” said Passious Green, a black parent from Virginia Beach, Va. to deal with a possible school shooting.
Paul Neil, who grew up in New York’s Bronx neighborhood and went to a high school with metal detectors and police, found these security measures ineffective in his personal experience.

“Black people as a whole, we try not to interact with the police unless we absolutely have to and to be in a space like a school, it becomes inevitable that you have to interact with them to some degree,” said he declared. . “So that becomes the ultimate worry where a dismissal could become an arrest that would be on their record and it becomes something that they have to deal with, as they’re just trying to get to school.”

Police ‘don’t make black and brown kids feel safe’

Pringle, the Minnesota parent and activist, said adding police to schools in response to a shooting is a reaction meant to appease parents who aren’t concerned about racial profiling by police. She said she has heard from parents across the country who have expressed concerns about themselves or their children being profiled because of their race or immigration status. Pringle believes there is no need for school resource officers or any type of law enforcement to be present on school campuses in general.

“Cops have no place in schools. They are part of the school-to-prison pipeline when it comes to black and brown children. They don’t make black and brown kids feel safe,” she said. “A lot of the time, black and brown kids are criminalized for developmentally appropriate things, things that school can handle.”

Instead, schools should reach out to their communities and partner with local organizations to provide culturally appropriate services and give students more voice and solicit their opinions on school safety, Pringle said.

According to Yahaira Lopez, a black and Latino parent from Boston with a child with special needs, it is not appropriate to increase police presence in schools in response to a shooting. But removing them from schools entirely raises more questions than it answers, she said, because she doesn’t know what an alternative safety measure would entail.

“We don’t want to be overwatched, we don’t want the police targeting our black and brown kids and locking them up,” she said. “But what is the alternative? This is a conversation that we need to have as parents and community leaders, and say, what is the solution?”

According to Lopez, investing in mental health supports and guidance counselors is one answer, but she wonders what can be expected of these professionals in terms of identifying and preventing potentially dangerous student behaviors and what are the additional burdens that teachers will face in the absence of school resource officers. These are critical issues that need to be addressed before removing the police from schools altogether, she said.

“I just want my kids to be safe”

For some other parents of color, however, the police are still responsible and able to protect their children at school. Antonia Chávez, a parent from Tulsa, Okla., speaking through a translator, said she thinks school systems should increase police presence after a shooting because she thinks those responsible for the Law enforcement are better equipped than school employees to respond to emergencies, such as a school shooting.

A few months ago, her 9th grade son’s classmate pulled out a switchblade knife and held it to her son’s stomach at school, she said. Although no one was injured, the incident made Chavez want more security in and around his son’s school.

In theory, police should be able to control violence in schools compared to a security guard, teacher or parent because they are better trained and prepared for those situations, Lopez said. What happened at Uvalde was more of a situational failure than a systemic failure, she believes.

“We should feel frustrated, angry and helpless because all these staff were outside and waiting when they could have done something to prevent more deaths or maybe none of them did. ‘could have died,’ she said through an interpreter.

“I want more security but I understand that the police can’t do much and they haven’t done much from the outside,” she added. “Maybe something could have been done from within.”

carlos rivera

Carlos Rivera, a Latino parent from Columbus, Ohio, said he plans to go to his local school board meeting next year, when his children start middle school in Franklin County, to request a police presence. increased in schools, as well as more training. police officers to deal with classroom conflict and other issues that frequently arise in schools, such as fights between students.

Rivera said he is not concerned that his children will be discriminated against or negatively affected by the police presence on campus. “I think as long as the police engage with the community, I don’t think there’s room for discrimination,” he said. “I just want my kids to be somewhere safe, I think real police, who believe in safety, will protect anyone. It doesn’t matter what breed or where they come from.

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John Roemer, retired judge killed in attack, remembered for his dedication https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/john-roemer-retired-judge-killed-in-attack-remembered-for-his-dedication/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 11:08:52 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/john-roemer-retired-judge-killed-in-attack-remembered-for-his-dedication/ The retired Juneau County judge who was killed friday in what authorities said was an attack linked to the justice system “cared deeply” about doing its job well, was fair to all and treated everyone in its courtroom with respect, community members said . John Roemer, 68, was a “brilliant jurist who spent an incredible […]]]>

The retired Juneau County judge who was killed friday in what authorities said was an attack linked to the justice system “cared deeply” about doing its job well, was fair to all and treated everyone in its courtroom with respect, community members said .

John Roemer, 68, was a “brilliant jurist who spent an incredible amount of time doing the right thing,” said Scott Southworth, who served as the Juneau County prosecutor from 2005 to 2013.

“I learned a lot from him,” he said.

A 56-year-old man allegedly shot him at his home ‘based on some kind of court case or court cases,’ Wisconsin Attorney General Josh Kaul told a news conference on Friday. . The “targeted act” included other intended victims, Kaul said, although the attorney general did not identify them.

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St. Paul’s Library Board is torn over the fate of the Hamline-Midway branch https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/st-pauls-library-board-is-torn-over-the-fate-of-the-hamline-midway-branch/ Wed, 01 Jun 2022 22:32:34 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/st-pauls-library-board-is-torn-over-the-fate-of-the-hamline-midway-branch/ A St. Paul’s Library board meeting turned unusually contentious and emotional on Wednesday over the fate of the Hamline-Midway branch library, which is set for demolition. and an $8.1 million complete rebuild. As for a customer-focused public process, “we have been misled,” said council member Jane Prince, chair of the library’s board of trustees, while […]]]>

A St. Paul’s Library board meeting turned unusually contentious and emotional on Wednesday over the fate of the Hamline-Midway branch library, which is set for demolition. and an $8.1 million complete rebuild.

As for a customer-focused public process, “we have been misled,” said council member Jane Prince, chair of the library’s board of trustees, while reading a statement of opposition from three minutes in the record. Prince accused library management of mounting an awareness campaign around a long, predetermined decision not to preserve the existing building on Minnehaha Avenue.

The comments drew an instant rebuke from council members Mitra Jalali and Chris Tolbert, as well as library director Catherine Penkert, who defended the lengthy process of public engagement behind the decision not to remodel the structure for years 1930, which lacks modern disabled access and meeting space. .

“I don’t think the statement that was made is fair or professional,” Jalali said, speaking to Prince.

RENOVATIONS, SECURITY ISSUES

On Wednesday, as St. Paul’s Library Board, City Council members quietly attended staff presentations on an upcoming $65,000 redesign of the George Latimer Central Library’s Nicholson Commons space. downtown, as well as a $4.4 million renovation of the Hayden Heights branch and a $5.5 million addition to the Riverview branch. The latter two projects have yet to be funded or scheduled, but LSE Architects have unveiled concept designs.

The George Latimer Library Innovation Lab reception in downtown St. Paul on Wednesday, June 1, 2022. (John Autey/Pioneer Press)

They also heard presentations from staff on ongoing efforts to address public safety issues in libraries, in addition to the growing needs for human services frontline staff are struggling to navigate on their own. same.

Library officials said that in the past four months alone, four women have arrived at the Rondo branch on Dale Street asking for protection from domestic violence, the type of request that may have surfaced multiple times in the over an entire decade.

“I hope our employees feel comfortable raising difficult issues,” Prince said, noting that the city recently hired a social worker for the Rondo site, but the city is otherwise not. not a funded social service provider.

CHARGES AROUND REBUILDING VS. PRESERVATION

Then came a presentation from LSE Architects on the proverbial elephant in the room – a proposal to rebuild rather than just remodel the Hamline-Midway branch.

Minneapolis company officials said the goal is to increase the building’s footprint by 30%, increase usable space by up to 50%, and bring restrooms, meeting rooms to flexible use and entrances on a linear ground level, improving sight lines. and accessibility.

The hope is to reuse as much of the existing structure’s red brick facade and distinctive stone arch of the existing structure as possible in a brand new building that is more equipped for modern needs like remote working and group projects. .

“Looking at the rendering, I thought I might feel some anxiety or disappointment,” Jalali told the board. “But it’s really beautiful.”

Prince, who chairs the library’s board, then tried to close the meeting with a three-minute statement saying the library system had deviated from a written promise that “we will implement what you decide”.

She noted that in a citywide survey by the city’s capital improvement budget committee, most respondents called for renovation rather than reconstruction.

“Library management completely dismissed the results of the survey, choosing instead to seek only funds for demolition and reconstruction,” Prince said. “What does this say about how we as a city claim to value public engagement?”

BUILDING FOR THE FUTURE

Fighting back tears, Penkert denied the charges and said she was “extremely disappointed to hear the library board chair close in this way.”

She then recited aloud a comment she had received from a patron: “’My niece uses a wheelchair. I’m ashamed to bring it to our neighborhood library. We go to the Highland Library instead. … We are building a library for her.

At the downtown library, Nicholson Commons, which has its own endowment from the Nicholson family, is planning approximately $65,000 upgrades to make it a more user-friendly space, including new small, medium and large rooms. meeting.

The Nicholson Commons in the George Latimer Library in downtown St. Paul on Wednesday, June 1, 2022. (John Autey/Pioneer Press)
The Nicholson Commons in the George Latimer Library in downtown St. Paul on Wednesday, June 1, 2022. (John Autey/Pioneer Press)

Prince and other council members expressed interest in the fate of the site’s St. Paul collection, which includes century-old city maps and directories, archival documents from the Pioneer Press newspaper, and other historical traditions. Marika Staloch, head of special projects for the library, said no final decision has been made on how to preserve the collection.

“It can move,” she acknowledged.

The Downtown Central Library’s third-floor Innovation Lab — a creative and creative space for artists, small business owners, and hobbyists — has also undergone upgrades. Public art is currently being installed ahead of a celebration on the evening of June 15.

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Mass violence weighs on the psyche of Americans https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/mass-violence-weighs-on-the-psyche-of-americans/ Thu, 26 May 2022 18:26:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/mass-violence-weighs-on-the-psyche-of-americans/ Placeholder while loading article actions When the American Psychological Association surveyed more than 2,000 people about their stress levels just days after back-to-back mass shootings in El Paso and Dayton, Ohio, in 2019, the results revealed the toll of seemingly relentless violence and random. A third of respondents said they would no longer go to […]]]>
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When the American Psychological Association surveyed more than 2,000 people about their stress levels just days after back-to-back mass shootings in El Paso and Dayton, Ohio, in 2019, the results revealed the toll of seemingly relentless violence and random.

A third of respondents said they would no longer go to certain public places for fear of being the victim of a mass shooting. Almost as many said they couldn’t go anywhere without fear of being shot. Twenty-four percent said they made changes in their lives because of their fear of a mass shooting.

Sixty-two percent of parents said they lived in fear that their children would be victims of a mass shooting, and 71% said the possibility of mass violence added stress to their lives. The poll used an online survey with non-random methods, so results may not be nationally representative.

Attacks on the psyche of Americans have only intensified since then, with a more than two-year pandemic that has claimed the lives of 1 million people in the United States; street battles in the fight for racial justice; a war in Ukraine that has rekindled fears of a nuclear conflict; a rollercoaster economy; an insurgent riot at the United States Capitol; a visible worsening of the effects of climate change and many more mass shootings. These culminated in the Tuesday massacre of 19 children and two adults at an elementary school in Uvalde, Texas, just 10 days after the massacre of 10 black shoppers and workers at a Buffalo supermarket.

Experts say the relentless developments are taking a toll on our mental and physical health and how we interact as a society. The targeting of churches and schools has been particularly distressing for many people who have long viewed them as spaces sheltered from the turmoil of the world.

“People are emotionally drained,” said Roxane Cohen Silver, a University of California, Irvine psychologist who has studied trauma for decades. “We cannot see any of these events in isolation. We are witnessing a cascade of collective trauma. … I don’t think many people could have conceived of such a degree of loss.

The impact is felt more deeply by communities already under pressure. “It has an impact on the country as a whole and an even greater impact on people of color, who are largely the victims of these last two incidents,” said Reverend Ray Hammond, pastor of Bethel AME Church. in Boston, who has worked on anti-violence initiatives for decades.

“Even though intellectually you know it’s a rare thing, the feeling of insecurity is cumulative, and I think for a lot of people it’s extremely unsettling,” he said.

The New American Normal: “Why are we willing to live with this carnage?”

The idea that people of color feel more vulnerable is supported by the APA survey, which was incorporated into the organization’s annual report America Stress Report. Hispanics, blacks, Asians and Native Americans all reported more stress from mass shootings than whites.

A Quinnipiac University Poll and one Pew Research Center surveyboth conducted in 2018 after the mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, showed the same results, with blacks and Hispanics more fearful of mass violence than whites, and young people more worried than older respondents.

At a vigil for the victims of the shooting at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, residents and families came together to find comfort in their community. (Video: Alice Li, Jorge Ribas/The Washington Post)

Tuesday’s rampage brought further anguish to a nation that saw the faces of children like 10-year-old Amerie Jo Garza smiling proudly with her certificate of honor just hours before she was murdered by a gunman with a assault rifle.

The investigations, the experts said, affirm their belief that the repeated exposure to shocking acts of violence that occur with horrific regularity in this country, alone among its equals, affects people’s health.

“This is clearly having a significant negative impact, and particularly on our mental and physical health,” said Vaile Wright, senior director of healthcare innovation at APA, who works on Stress in America surveys. conducted every year since 2007.

When acts of mass violence “repeat in this way, they begin to feel more and more overwhelming and a sense of hopelessness begins to set in”, she said.

Human bodies aren’t supposed to be in a state of turmoil so often, she said. The result is hyper-vigilance, anxiety, and an inability to “be in the moment.” Some people can become desensitized to violence as a defense, she said.

“People feel so overwhelmed with stress and worry that they have to compartmentalize it to some degree,” Wright said.

Joshua Morganstein, a psychiatrist and chair of the American Psychiatric Association’s Committee on the Psychiatric Dimensions of Disasters, noted that schools are considered safe places, as are places of worship – both of which have been attacked in shootings by mass in recent years.

It is particularly distressing when these places are hit by violence, he said. And the death of children in violent acts adds another layer of horror: “It also challenges our perception and belief about the natural order of life in the world, which is that parents are supposed to precede their children in death, not the other way around. ,” he said.

Morganstein suggested people watch their news intake about horrific events like the Uvalde shooting. It’s not insensitive to turn off the news, he said — it can be necessary for mental health.

“The media is such an important source of information for us, but we know that exposure to disaster-related media is consistently associated with feelings of anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress symptoms, sleep, increased alcohol and tobacco use,” he said.

Silver, the Californian psychologist, studied the health consequences of exposure to information about the September 11 attacks and the war in Iraq, and found evidence to suggest that some people developed new cardiovascular diseases as a result. She is now studying the psychological and physical health consequences of this “continuous onslaught” of bad news on our sense of security.

Previous research on mass trauma shows that some people can develop conditions such as short-term anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, and other mental health issues.

And those exposed to multiple tragedies tend to have “greater distress, functional impairment, and lower life satisfaction,” according to a 2020 Silver commentary published in Nature Human Behavior, based on numerous studies. Bad news is amplified by rapid dissemination on social media and repetition throughout the 24-hour news cycle.

“We don’t just see or hear the news of these tragedies, but we see them in graphic color,” she said.

In addition to reducing information consumption, experts advised focusing on what can be controlled rather than worrying about what might happen, and putting upsetting information in a larger context.

Mass shootings in which four or more people are killed account for less than 1% of the roughly 20,000 firearm homicides in the United States each year, according to Jillian Peterson, associate professor of criminology and criminal justice at Hamline University. of St. Paul, Minn. Firearm suicides account for approximately 60% of all firearm deaths each year.

“The most dangerous thing you’ll do today is get in a car,” said Joel Dvoskin, clinical assistant professor of psychiatry at the University of Arizona School of Medicine. “And actually, we’ve made it safer.”

But Beverly Kingston, director of the Center for the Study and Prevention of Violence at the University of Colorado, said society was only beginning to ask “how do we heal collective trauma? How do we recognize that our society is built on layers of trauma? »

“I fear that our collective trauma is getting in the way of what we could do to create a better society,” she said.

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