Hamline Committee – Hamline Midway History http://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 01:38:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/hamline-midway-history-icon-150x150.jpg Hamline Committee – Hamline Midway History http://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/ 32 32 Court battle over ventilator takes patient from Minnesota to Texas https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/court-battle-over-ventilator-takes-patient-from-minnesota-to-texas/ Sat, 22 Jan 2022 01:38:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/court-battle-over-ventilator-takes-patient-from-minnesota-to-texas/ Scott Quiner, operations manager at a Minnesota transportation company, fell ill with Covid-19 in October. Mr Quiner, 55, who was not vaccinated, was hospitalized the following month and his case became so severe that he had to be placed on a ventilator, court records show. For weeks, he remained on a ventilator at Mercy Hospital […]]]>

Scott Quiner, operations manager at a Minnesota transportation company, fell ill with Covid-19 in October.

Mr Quiner, 55, who was not vaccinated, was hospitalized the following month and his case became so severe that he had to be placed on a ventilator, court records show. For weeks, he remained on a ventilator at Mercy Hospital in Coon Rapids, Minnesota, a town of 62,000 about 16 miles north of Minneapolis.

Then, on January 11, hospital officials told Mr. Quiner’s wife, Anne, that they would remove him from the ventilator in two days, despite his objections.

What followed was a court case that raised questions about who has the right to make harrowing life-and-death decisions when patients cannot speak for themselves. He also pointed to tensions between people who refuse the coronavirus vaccine and hospitals that have been filled with patients with the virus, the majority unvaccinated.

In court documents, Mercy Hospital did not provide specific reasons why it decided to remove Mr. Quiner from the ventilator. Allina Health, which oversees the hospital, declined to comment on Mr Quiner’s case, citing patient confidentiality. Ms. Quiner did not respond to messages seeking comment.

On January 12, Ms Quiner pleaded for the help of a lawyer on the ‘Stew Peters Show’, a podcast whose host falsely called coronavirus vaccines ‘toxic beatings’ and gave a platform pandemic conspiracy theories.

She said that other than her husband’s lungs, his organs were working and “there was nothing wrong with his brain”. Just days earlier, she said, her husband had opened his eyes “and was more alert.”

“I think, ‘Why are you killing him? ‘” Said Ms Quiner, whose husband made her his health worker in 2017. Under Minnesota lawthis means she has the power to make medical decisions on his behalf if he is unable on his own.

Credit…Marjorie J. Holsten

On the day of her podcast appearance, she found a lawyer, Marjorie Holsten, who immediately filed for a restraining order to stop the hospital from removing Mr. Quiner from the ventilator.

Judge Jennifer Stanfield of the Anoka County Tenth Judicial District Court granted the order. On Jan. 15, Mr. Quiner was airlifted to a Texas hospital, where, Ms. Holsten said, his condition had improved significantly. She declined to identify the hospital.

Ms Holsten said: ‘He was conscious until they gave him a ton of sedatives. That’s when he was put on a ventilator. In Texas, she said Wednesday, “the doctor said he waved his hand” and “nodded and blinked in response.”

Mr Quiner, who remains on a ventilator, had lost 30 pounds and was described as the “most malnourished patient” a Texas hospital doctor had ever seen, Ms Holsten said.

Allina Health said in a statement that it “has great confidence in the exceptional care provided to our patients, which is administered using evidence-based practices by our talented and compassionate medical teams.”

“Allina Health continues to wish the patient and his family well,” the statement read.

In court papers, lawyers at Mercy Hospital said Mr Quiner’s treatment was based “on the best science and medical authority available”. In a motion, the lawyers asked Judge Stanfield to issue an order stating that the hospital had the authority to remove the ventilator.

Specialists were consulted and the treatment was “consistent with Mercy’s policies and procedures regarding medically non-beneficial interventions,” the attorneys wrote.

Mr Quiner did not specify whether he wanted to be kept alive on machines in his advance directive, a legal document stating what treatments he does and does not want.

On the form, he specified his wishes only in a section that asked about spiritual and religious beliefs.

“Ask family and friends for prayer at the bedside,” he wrote.

Minnesota hospitals have been overwhelmed with a combination of Covid-19 patients and those with other conditions, particularly in the Minneapolis and St. Paul area, according to the Covid-19 hospitalization monitoring project to University of Minnesota.

Thusday, only 1% of adult beds in the intensive care unit were available, according to the Minnesota Department of Health.

Resource scarcity can be a factor in a hospital’s decision to withdraw care, but it’s rarely a major factor, said Thaddee Popeprofessor who teaches health law and bioethics at the Mitchell Hamline School of Law in St. Paul.

Under Minnesota law, healthcare providers who believe a health worker is not acting in a patient’s best interest must appear before a judge, he said.

“It’s a rare situation where you’re going to override what the officer is saying,” Prof Pope said. “The hospital does not make health care decisions. The patient does it, and if the patient doesn’t have the capacity, the health worker does it.

Before going to court, doctors should try to communicate effectively with a health worker, he said. If that fails, doctors should present their case to an ethics committee, which would ideally include members of the community in addition to health workers, to determine whether the authority of the health worker should be overridden, said Professor Pope.

The decision to remove life support machines is easier when doctors have determined that a patient meets the criteria for brain death, said Dr. Mary Groll, professor of health sciences at North Central College in Naperville, Illinois.

But if a patient’s brain function is intact and a meaningful life remains possible, decisions about medical care rest more squarely with the patient or their proxy, Dr. Groll said. Physicians should then have candid conversations about what kind of future a patient may face, she said.

Medical training has become more focused on prioritizing a patient’s medical wishes, Dr. Groll said.

“Ultimately, it all starts and ends with your patient,” Dr. Groll said. “Your care starts with that person and ends with that person, and they should be at the center of decision-making.”

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Ramsey County Commissioner Toni Carter will not seek re-election – Twin Cities https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/ramsey-county-commissioner-toni-carter-will-not-seek-re-election-twin-cities/ Thu, 20 Jan 2022 01:58:26 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/ramsey-county-commissioner-toni-carter-will-not-seek-re-election-twin-cities/ Longtime Ramsey County Commissioner Toni Carter said Wednesday she will not be running again in the fall. Carter, whose District 4 encompasses several St. Paul neighborhoods, was first elected to the Board of Commissioners in 2005 and served as its chairman for the past two years. The first African-American to win a seat on the […]]]>

Longtime Ramsey County Commissioner Toni Carter said Wednesday she will not be running again in the fall.

Carter, whose District 4 encompasses several St. Paul neighborhoods, was first elected to the Board of Commissioners in 2005 and served as its chairman for the past two years. The first African-American to win a seat on the Minnesota County Board of Directors, she is also the mother of St. Paul Mayor Melvin Carter III and husband of the former St. Paul Police Sergeant. Melvin Carter Jr.

“After much deliberation, I have decided to make this my last year as county commissioner,” Carter said. in a Facebook post.

“I am especially grateful to have served as chair of the board during a tumultuous time that made county systems and services more relevant and necessary than ever,” she wrote. “While punctuated by the ongoing pandemic, global racial awareness and intense social unrest, the past two years have also proven to accelerate our work in building a community-engaged framework for inclusive economic growth. and fair.”

During his time on the board, Carter helped shape the Green Line light rail project, which runs through his neighborhood along University Avenue, seeing it as an opportunity to further revitalize the corridor.

As a member of the Metropolitan Council’s Central Corridor Management Committee, she was one of a handful of officials who successfully advocated for the addition of light rail stops at Western Avenue, Victoria Street and Hamline Avenue, which were excluded from the original plan.

Carter also serves on the Minnesota Human Services Performance Council, which is charged with monitoring and improving state service delivery to counties, and on the Ramsey County Alternatives to Juvenile Detention Initiative Stakeholder Committee. .

In his Facebook post, Carter reflected on his tenure on the board: “The amount of work we’ve done together is humbling: we’ve reduced admissions to youth detention centers and trips out of the correctional home by 85% and 74% respectively, creating unprecedented housing. supports for our lowest income residents, building Rondo Plaza, rebuilding the Dale Street Bridge and ensuring that our Green Line LRT stops for all of us stand out as indicators of our focus on the county-wide equity and inclusion, and our work to apply a data-driven, community-engaged equity lens across county systems. »

Carter, who grew up in Cleveland, moved to Minnesota in 1971 to attend Carleton College in Northfield. She left a career as a systems engineer after 15 years at IBM in Minneapolis for a second act in public service in the early 1990s.

Before winning her seat on the county council, she worked as a teacher at Crosswinds Middle School and was elected in 2001 to the St. Paul School Board, where she also served as president.

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Questions persist a year after GOP group voted proxy for Electoral College for Trump | local government https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/questions-persist-a-year-after-gop-group-voted-proxy-for-electoral-college-for-trump-local-government/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 12:05:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/questions-persist-a-year-after-gop-group-voted-proxy-for-electoral-college-for-trump-local-government/ If Republicans who signed official-looking documents in late 2020 seeking to hand over Wisconsin Electoral College votes to President Donald Trump wanted to challenge the results, there was a different process for doing so. Instead, as Wisconsin’s Democratic voters list gathered at the state Capitol on Dec. 14, 2020, to deliver the state’s 10 electoral […]]]>

If Republicans who signed official-looking documents in late 2020 seeking to hand over Wisconsin Electoral College votes to President Donald Trump wanted to challenge the results, there was a different process for doing so.

Instead, as Wisconsin’s Democratic voters list gathered at the state Capitol on Dec. 14, 2020, to deliver the state’s 10 electoral votes to President-elect Joe Biden, Republicans chose a method unorthodox, also meeting in the building to sign documents. claiming that Trump had won the state.

The meeting came an hour after the Wisconsin Supreme Court ruled Biden had won the election and a month after Wisconsin county clerks reviewed the presidential election results.

More than a year later, multiple agencies have yet to rule on complaints alleging Republicans committed fraud.

The United States Constitution assigns the voter selection process to state law. Under Wisconsin law, the voters list chosen by the candidate who wins the popular vote is sat and ultimately delivers those votes to Congress.

In the event of a genuine dispute over voters or who actually won the popular vote, the Voter Count Act allows a member of the U.S. Senate and a member of the U.S. House to request an additional debate, David said. Schultz, professor of political science. science at Hamline University. The United States Code also allows Congress to intervene in serious voter disputes.

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Burnsville city manager resigns | Burnsville https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/burnsville-city-manager-resigns-burnsville/ Fri, 14 Jan 2022 22:07:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/burnsville-city-manager-resigns-burnsville/ Burnsville City Manager Melanie Mesko Lee resigned on Friday, January 14. City Council will formally accept the resignation at its meeting on Tuesday, January 18. The council has appointed deputy city manager Gregg Lindberg to an interim city manager position. Lindberg has served as Deputy Director of Burnsville since July 2019 and has over 20 […]]]>

Burnsville City Manager Melanie Mesko Lee resigned on Friday, January 14.

City Council will formally accept the resignation at its meeting on Tuesday, January 18.

The council has appointed deputy city manager Gregg Lindberg to an interim city manager position. Lindberg has served as Deputy Director of Burnsville since July 2019 and has over 20 years of local government and leadership development experience.

“Gregg is the right person to lead our organization alongside our leadership team,” Mayor Elizabeth Kautz said in a city news release. “He has extensive knowledge of local administration and staff development. His passion for the Burnsville community is inspiring and I am confident he will help us grow from a great service organization to a great one.

Lee started as Burnsville city manager in January 2019 after serving as Hastings city administrator since 2013 and deputy administrator for 14 years prior.

Under Lee’s leadership, the city successfully met the challenges posed by COVID-19 and successfully lobbied for special tax increase funding legislation for the Burnsville center redevelopment, according to the release. hurry.

During his tenure, the organization remained true to its commitment to becoming an employer of choice, began working on inclusion and belonging, reinvested in employee professional growth initiatives, and adopted policies flexible working hours, the statement said.

During her tenure in Burnsville, Lee also served as president of Metro Cities and a member of the boards of the Metropolitan Area Management Association and the Burnsville YMCA. She was a member of the Burnsville Breakfast Rotary. She has represented Burnsville on committees or task forces at the county, metro and state levels.

Lindberg was a member of the St. Louis Park City Council from 2014 to 2018. He has taught public administration and organizational development courses at St. Paul College and Metro State University, and currently teaches at Hamline University and at Bethel University. Prior to working in Burnsville, Lindberg was Director of Human Resources at Three Rivers Park District for 13 years.

In Burnsville, Lindberg supports the duties of the City Manager and leads the Corporate Services Division – including Communications and Community Engagement, City Clerk’s Office, Finance, Human Resources and Information Technology. He is instrumental in the city’s new community engagement initiatives and organizational development programs for city staff.

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Continuing the work of the 2021 National Resource Stewardship Summit Action Plan https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/continuing-the-work-of-the-2021-national-resource-stewardship-summit-action-plan/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 17:58:18 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/continuing-the-work-of-the-2021-national-resource-stewardship-summit-action-plan/ On November 2, 2021, the National Alliance for Public Safety Foundation (NAPSG) released the “Key Findings and Action Plan for the 2021 National Resource Stewardship Summit” (https://www.napsgfoundation.org/new-publication-key-findings-and-action-plan-for-2021-national-resource-management-summit/). The project was funded through a partnership with the US Department of Homeland Security’s Science and Technology Directorate. I had the honor and privilege of participating in the […]]]>

On November 2, 2021, the National Alliance for Public Safety Foundation (NAPSG) released the “Key Findings and Action Plan for the 2021 National Resource Stewardship Summit” (https://www.napsgfoundation.org/new-publication-key-findings-and-action-plan-for-2021-national-resource-management-summit/). The project was funded through a partnership with the US Department of Homeland Security’s Science and Technology Directorate. I had the honor and privilege of participating in the Summit along with a wide range of other public safety stakeholders from across the United States. The goal of the summit was to “collaborate with the community to define essential requirements for resource management readiness technology and tools that will maximize value and increase utilization among state, local, tribal, and territorial agencies, and other partners”. (https://www.napsgfoundation.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/2021-NRMS-Findings-and-Action-Plan.pdf)

From the seemingly mundane task of inventorying resources for annual insurance coverage, to tracking the due date of equipment for routine scheduled maintenance, to deploying resources through the Emergency Management Assistance for Mutual Assistance between States (https://www.emacweb.org/), the value of good resource management processes cannot be underestimated. Developing systems and processes that consider as many aspects of resource management as possible is important to maximize stakeholder buy-in. This holistic approach is also important to support the adage “fight while you train”. Building muscle memory with how resource management systems work during normal, routine operations (such as insurance tracking, planned maintenance, replacement timing, etc.) increases the likelihood that these systems will be used for management resources during a large-scale disaster response. Finding, developing and maintaining technology systems that support effective resource management is a vital need. The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and DHS S&T, along with the NAPSG Foundation, leveraged the National Resource Management Summit to identify essential resource management technology requirements for the stated purpose of to increase the added value of these systems to state, local, tribal and territorial agencies as well as other partners.

Based on the findings identified by the Summit, an action plan has been developed that sets out specific requirements for the National Resources Hub suite (https://preptoolkit.fema.gov/web/national-resource-hub/about). Although setting a timeline was outside the scope of the NAPSG’s work, I strongly encourage FEMA and DHS to continue the work begun at this Summit with respect to resource management. The action plan provided defines specific, measurable, achievable and relevant objectives (SMART objectives). The only thing missing is the time base for implementation. A few of the action items relate to already existing tools (such as the FEMA Resource Typing Library Tool, RTLT) or existing training resources (various programs from the National Emergency Training Center of FEMA), potentially leverage existing FEMA public assistance cost codes, are complementary to efforts to update job titles and job qualifications, and are all consistent with the fundamentals of the National Incident Management System.

Resource management will always be a basic need of state, local, tribal, and territorial agencies and other partners for routine operations through to major disaster response. The leadership and investment of FEMA and DHS S&T in this effort is critical to improving the United States’ all-hazards preparedness. The 2021 National Resource Stewardship Summit was a great initiative and the action plan should be used to move this important work forward.

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Public Comment Prompts Changes to Proposed Religious Use Ordinance https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/public-comment-prompts-changes-to-proposed-religious-use-ordinance/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 22:54:38 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/public-comment-prompts-changes-to-proposed-religious-use-ordinance/ By Jane McClure The new regulations for religious uses in St. Paul are very different from what they were a few months ago, when they caused a citywide outcry.The passage of the new regulations will clarify and streamline how faith-based institutions can use their buildings and grounds. The current version of the ordinance won a […]]]>

By Jane McClure

The new regulations for religious uses in St. Paul are very different from what they were a few months ago, when they caused a citywide outcry.
The passage of the new regulations will clarify and streamline how faith-based institutions can use their buildings and grounds. The current version of the ordinance won a recommendation for approval in December from the St. Paul Planning Commission. The settlement must be passed by February 1, the deadline ordered by the federal court.
On December 17, the St. Paul Planning Commission unanimously approved the proposed settlement, which was extensively rewritten after a public hearing in October. Sixteen speakers and approximately 150 individuals and institutions sent written comments, all raising objections to the original proposal. Planning staff and a commission committee worked with the Interfaith Action Coalition and others to revise the ordinance.
Faith leaders and congregational members said the regulations as originally presented would negatively impact their work serving communities through a host of programs and services. Potential conflicts with the free exercise of faith under the federal government prompted the Planning Commission to drop a proposed incidental use regulation. This could have limited new construction to ancillary purposes.
This section of the proposed ordinance was also considered a violation of the federal Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act (RLUIPA). RLUIPA prohibits local governments from regulating land use that imposes a substantial burden on religious exercise.

The churches of the region weigh
Several churches in the Midway area have requested changes. One is the Bethlehem Lutheran Church Halfway, 436 N. Roy St. Pastor Kirsten Fryer highlighted the many roles of the church in the community, including providing refuge to neighbors affected by smoke, tear gas and pepper spray during the 2020 civil unrest after the murder. of George Floyd. “Without a doubt, we said yes because we believe that our religious community obliges us to provide shelter to those in need,” she said. This led to it becoming a food hub serving 17,000 people while local grocery stores were closed.
The church has been home to Open Hands Midway since 2009, which provides meals and food. A new food shelf was created in 2020. A previous version of the bylaw would have required the church to go through the conditional use permit review and approval process.
St. Anthony Park United Church of Christ, 2129 Commonwealth Ave., sent a history lesson to the Planning Commission.
“.. our church hosts a scout troop. Troop 17 celebrated its centennial in 2015. It is the second oldest continuously chartered troop in Minnesota and the oldest continuously chartered troop in Minnesota by (the church) an organization. This troop still meets in the same building as when it started! While we expect this relationship to be grandfathered, we believe the rules should also support new, similar relationships… If a place of worship has more space than it can use for the good of the community, why couldn’t they use it?” The letter was signed by Reverend Victoria Wilgocki and Moderator Beth Magistad.
Reverend John Marboe of Zion Lutheran Church, 1697 LaFond Avenue, called the original ordinance “very problematic.” He challenged the definition of “accessory” uses of the city. “Religious education is essential. Feeding the hungry is essential. Serving the poor is paramount. Fostering healthy communities is paramount. A community that ‘worships’ without engaging in these things is not worshipping,” he said.
Marboe called several aspects of the original ordinance too restrictive, adding that the ordinance as it was first drafted “restricts the ability of religious institutions to do things that actually improve neighborhoods and communities.” communities and make the city more livable”.
Dozens of other people from across the city weighed in, all opposing the regulations. One person offered to pray for the Planning Commission.

So what has changed?
The city council will act on an ordinance that does not regulate so-called accessory uses and the notion of building more space to accommodate them.
Restricting new buildings and additions is seen as a burden on growing congregations, Dermody said. Many religious institutions maintain multi-purpose spaces that are used for a variety of events, including events open to the whole community.
Many uses of the city considered accessory uses are in fact essential to the mission of a congregation. “The institutes provide valuable community services that complement government services,” the city staff report says.
The proposed settlement no longer includes a conditional use permit requirement for social services and community uses over 1,000 square feet. Conditional use permits would now be required for uses over 7,000 square feet and for homeless-serving facilities such as drop-in centers. This mirrors homeless services zoning bylaws passed by City Council in the fall of 2021.
Overnight shelters for up to 25 adults and homeless services are still considered incidental uses.
A night shelter is a place where people using the shelter pack their bags and pick up their belongings every morning. Emergency accommodation allows people to stay longer. The number of emergency dwellings would be limited by occupancy regulations related to building and fire codes, not zoning regulations.
Day care centers and kindergartens, which are only allowed in the former regional institutions, would now be allowed in the current institutions. Many places of worship lease space to day care centers and preschools, but have been grandfathered because they predate the current zoning code. Changes could have affected the Midway churches which house day care centers and preschools. These include Hamline Church United Methodist, 1514 Englewood Ave., and Knox International Center, 1536 W. Minnesota Ave.
A proposal raised at the October hearing is not addressed by the latest round of zoning changes. St. Peter Claver Catholic Church, 375 N. Oxford St., would like to add senior housing to its property. That would be allowed up to current single-family zoning, Dermody said. But the church, school and clergy quarters are within a block near traditional mixed-use and multi-family neighborhoods, so a separate rezoning application would accommodate those plans.
Another pending change concerns the definition of community centres. This is a change that would go beyond denominational institutions.
St. Paul has had what are defined as “non-commercial recreation centers” for many years. These regulations have covered municipal recreation centers, which since the 1970s must have conditional use permits. Dermody noted that several recreation centers in the city do not meet all current requirements. For example, Linwood, Groveland, and Martin Luther King Recreation Centers are not located on thoroughfares. now. The proposed amendments would eliminate the arterial requirement and conditional use license requirement for municipal, religious and non-profit community centres.
Some small uses, such as travel agency accounting departments or small offices housed in religious institutions, would only require review and approval by city staff for approval. These are regulated in the same way as home occupations.
The proposed changes are sparked by the long fight over Listening House, which moved from downtown to a church in Dayton’s Bluff several years ago. The homeless drop-in center opened with the approval of city staff, but without a neighborhood process. Neighbors protested and the matter was taken to the planning commission and the city council.
A debate over the city’s operating conditions for Listening House, considered onerous, has landed in court. The House of Listening remains open.
The city is to set regulations for uses in faith-based institutions, as part of a 2019 U.S. District Court-ordered settlement with the host First Lutheran Church. The city had imposed more than a dozen operating conditions on Listening House, prompting the lawsuit filed by the church.

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Jamie Raskin warns of Trump’s control over GOP, ‘authoritarian approach’ https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/jamie-raskin-warns-of-trumps-control-over-gop-authoritarian-approach/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 00:39:27 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/jamie-raskin-warns-of-trumps-control-over-gop-authoritarian-approach/ Congressman Jamie Raskin on Sunday warned of the emergence of authoritarian tendencies within the Republican Party, which remains largely controlled by former President Donald Trump. “Donald Trump’s GOP now positions itself outside the constitutional order,” the Democrat of Maryland told ABC News’ This week. “They are attacking our constitutional processes and they are attacking the […]]]>

Congressman Jamie Raskin on Sunday warned of the emergence of authoritarian tendencies within the Republican Party, which remains largely controlled by former President Donald Trump.

“Donald Trump’s GOP now positions itself outside the constitutional order,” the Democrat of Maryland told ABC News’ This week. “They are attacking our constitutional processes and they are attacking the result of our elections.”

Raskin, who sits on the special House committee to investigate the Jan. 6 riot on the United States Capitol, added, “The GOP will rule, or they will ruin the prospects for political democracy to move forward. ‘another way, and that’s a fundamentally authoritarian approach. “

Raskin said some Republicans use “totalitarian tactics” when they “come up with lies” alleging voter fraud despite the lack of evidence to back up those claims.

Raskin was primarily responsible for impeaching the House during Trump’s second impeachment and dismissed the ex-president’s allegations of widespread voter fraud in the 2020 election. He said earlier this month that he refused to let American democracy “collapse”.

Opinions vary on why Trump remains so dominant in the Republican Party. FiveThirtyEight CEO Nate Silver noted on ABC News ” This week Sunday that “usually when presidential candidates lose elections, their parties seek a new face in the new round. But the evidence shows quite clearly that Trump is different.”

“Trump has been very successful in capturing people with fear, with prejudice, with emotions,” David Schultz, professor of politics at Hamline University in St. Paul, Minnesota, said in an interview with Al Jazeera on Friday. . “The Republican Party is Trump now. Without Trump, I don’t think there is a Republican Party.”

Trump is “the best-known Republican politician,” whether he is liked or not, agreed Matthew Dickinson, professor of politics at Middlebury College in Vermont, also speaking to Al Jazeera. “Most of the Republican establishment [doesn’t] like him, your electoral fortune is tied to Donald Trump’s ability to mobilize voters on your behalf. “

Republican Representative Adam Kinzinger, a frequent critic of Trump, said on Thursday that the former president was still the Republicans’ favorite, mainly because of GOP House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy.

“Kevin McCarthy alone is rightfully the reason Donald Trump is still a force in the party,” Kinzinger told The Associated Press. “This wholehearted embrace, which I saw firsthand among the members, not only scared them to confront Trump, but in some cases also wholeheartedly embraced him.”

News week contacted Trump’s office for comment.

Representative Jamie Raskin said on Sunday that former President Donald Trump’s control over the GOP would place Republicans “outside the constitutional order.” Above, Raskin listens during a select committee meeting investigating the January 6 attack on the Capitol Hill on October 19, 2021 in Washington, DC
Photo by Alex Wong / Getty Images

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Trump’s grip on US Republicans persists after January 6 | Donald Trump News https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/trumps-grip-on-us-republicans-persists-after-january-6-donald-trump-news/ Fri, 07 Jan 2022 13:21:25 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/trumps-grip-on-us-republicans-persists-after-january-6-donald-trump-news/ Washington DC – Former US President Donald Trump’s grip on the Republican Party has only tightened since he stepped down, despite the storm of controversy and the many criticisms he has faced in the wake of the riot last year at the Capitol. Part of the reason for his continued dominance, explained David Schultz, professor […]]]>

Washington DC – Former US President Donald Trump’s grip on the Republican Party has only tightened since he stepped down, despite the storm of controversy and the many criticisms he has faced in the wake of the riot last year at the Capitol.

Part of the reason for his continued dominance, explained David Schultz, professor of politics at Hamline University in Saint Paul, Minnesota, is that Trump remains a “charismatic” figure who appeals to the passions of Republican voters.

“Trump has been very successful in capturing people with fear, with prejudice, with emotions,” Schultz told Al Jazeera. “The Republican Party is Trump now. Without Trump, I don’t think there is a Republican Party.

Whether Trump’s outsized influence will last is an open question. Short-term political trends are in its favor, but continued investigations into its role in the January 6 insurgency and ongoing legal issues with its New York real estate business pose risks.

“Incitement to insurgency”

Trump continued to deny any role in the riot, despite his indictment by the US House of Representatives of “inciting insurgency,” and to make false claims that the election result 2020 he lost to President Joe Biden has been rigged.

A crowd of his supporters stormed the building after the Republican leader gave an inflammatory speech near the White House in which he urged the crowd to “fight like hell” and “stop the theft” .

Trump also tried to block a U.S. House of Representatives committee investigating the events of January 6 from accessing White House documents related to the riot, accusing lawmakers involved in the investigation of cover-up.

While this can hurt Trump with the vast majority of Americans believing Jan 6 was an attempt to overturn the 2020 election, it does help motivate Republican voters to buy what the ex-president is selling.

“Trump has tremendous support among the population,” Matthew Dickinson, professor of politics at Middlebury College in Vermont, told Al Jazeera.

“Donald Trump is the best-known Republican politician and therefore, whether you love him or hate him – and I frankly think most of the Republican establishment [doesn’t] like him, your electoral fortune is linked to Donald Trump’s ability to mobilize voters on your behalf.

Political influence

Trump is keeping the prospect of a 2024 return offer for the White House open and he is actively supporting Republican candidates in the upcoming midterm election. Trump has so far backed around 85 Republican candidates for public office, including some challengers of incumbent Republicans who Trump has broken up with.

In Georgia, a key state Trump lost in 2020, the former president has recruited and supported a team of political candidates to run for the next election that includes former American football star Herschel Walker and former Senator David Purdue .

Indeed, Trump’s endorsements can make or break a candidate. His support for Purdue against Republican Gov. Brian Kemp gave Purdue a boost and hurt Kemp, according to Charles Bullock, professor of political science at the University of Georgia.

“He has convinced Republican officials that his blessing is important to their political future and his damnation is fatal,” Bullock told Al Jazeera.

Former President Donald Trump kisses Georgia Senate candidate Herschel Walker during his “Save America” ​​rally in Perry, Georgia, September 2021 [File: Ben Gray/AP Photo)

In Arizona, Trump is planning to hold a political rally on January 15 to support former local news anchor Kari Lake for governor. Lake has said she believes Trump, not Biden, won the 2020 election in Arizona, even though three state audits showed Biden won.

“I’m honored to have President Trump’s endorsement. And I’m thrilled that he’s coming to Florence, Arizona, January 15 for his first rally of 2022. Let’s make this his biggest rally yet. I will see you there!” Lake tweeted on January 2.

In Alaska, a state Trump won twice, he has endorsed Kelly Tshibaka, a Republican state official who is challenging incumbent Senator Lisa Murkowski, one of seven Republican senators who voted to impeach Trump for the January 6 insurrection.

Trump endorsed Alaska Governor Mike Dunleavy on condition Dunleavy would not endorse Murkowski. “If Mike endorses her, which is his prerogative, my endorsement of him is null and void, and of no further force or effect!” Trump said in a statement.

Sen. Lisa Murkowski, R-Alaska, walks to the chamber at the Capitol.Republican Senator Lisa Murkowski of Alaska, who voted to convict Donald Trump in his second impeachment trial, faces a Trump-backed challenger in her 2022 fight for re-election [File: J Scott Applewhite/AP Photo]

Midterm elections

Certainly, Trump’s current influence within the Republican Party and his future political prospects will be tested in the upcoming November election. His track record of winning and losing in endorsements has been thwarted, although Republicans are poised to do well this year.

Some Republicans fear that party battles in the Republican primaries to challenge Trump’s grievances risk losing Democrats in the general election.

In Georgia, Trump sparked infighting among Republicans by prompting Purdue – who lost his Senate reelection bid last year – to run against incumbent Republican Kemp. Kemp had angered Trump when he certified Biden’s 2020 election victory in Georgia.

Nationally, the Alaska contest pits Trump against Republican Senate Leader Mitch McConnell, who backs Murkowski.

    Trump supporters, Reps Marjorie Taylor Green, Matt Gaetz and Louie Gohmert, are the new faces of the House Republican Party.Trump supporters Reps Marjorie Taylor Green, Matt Gaetz and Louie Gohmert are the new faces of the Republican Party in the House [J Scott Applewhite/AP Photo]

But another part of what keeps Trump relevant is the bitter partisanship that currently dominates U.S. politics, which analysts say is a function of the gerrymandering of congressional districts that sidelined the moderate voices of both parties.

While a few Republicans have dismissed Trump’s narrative, including Representative Adam Kinzinger, who voted for Trump’s impeachment but will not seek re-election mid-term, most have aligned themselves with Trump.

Meanwhile, a group of outspoken House members, including Reps Jim Jordan, Marjorie Taylor Greene, Matt Gaetz and Paul Gosar, have become the main cheerleaders in his message to Congress.

“Trump has always appealed to the right-wing base of the Republican Party and he managed to capture it,” Thomas Volgy, professor at the School of Government and Public Policy at the University of Arizona, told Al Jazeera.

“When you take gerrymandering, identity politics, punishing people who speak a different tone in your own political party… it’s very difficult for people to walk away. “


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A step-by-step guide to protecting your business from disasters https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/a-step-by-step-guide-to-protecting-your-business-from-disasters/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 19:44:04 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/a-step-by-step-guide-to-protecting-your-business-from-disasters/ Ed. Remark: This is the last part of a series of articles on maternity in the legal professions, in partnership with our friends from Mothers Esquire. Welcome Brandy Mai back to our pages. Click on here if you would like to donate to MothersEsquire. We are parents, caregivers and legal professionals. By definition, we spend […]]]>

Ed. Remark: This is the last part of a series of articles on maternity in the legal professions, in partnership with our friends from Mothers Esquire. Welcome Brandy Mai back to our pages. Click on here if you would like to donate to MothersEsquire.

We are parents, caregivers and legal professionals. By definition, we spend our personal and professional lives putting out proverbial fires. But are you prepared for a real fire or any other natural or man-made disaster that could disrupt your life, business or finances?

While many of us have survived natural disasters, shutdowns caused by COVID globally and the requirement to move quickly to work / distance learning have shown many people how under- prepared for such a transition.

Continuity and succession planning are things we’re often good at for our clients, but we’re not that good at creating these plans for ourselves. As an emergency manager and quasi-lawyer (passing the February bar exam), I’m here to make sure you’re ready for the next disaster.

Before I begin, I would like to say that I am not here to replace advice given to you by insurance companies, state bars or local / state emergency management agencies. All of these entities likely have contingency plans or training that you can customize for yourself or your business. However, it can often seem like a tedious task or something that you will have to do “on another day” because you just don’t have the time.

I always recommend that a person or business take the steps to create a comprehensive emergency plan, perform drills to train on the plan, and create recurring events on your calendar to update the plan. That being said, in the absence of that (or hiring someone to do it), here are some practical tips on how to start your own business continuity plan that can be accessed quickly when needed, and will help you. to prepare yourself when you are ready to make a more comprehensive plan.

  1. Create a folder in your online drive system (Google Drive, OneDrive, DropBox). The key here is for you and your staff to be able to access and add items from computers, phones, or tablets. Name it Disaster Plan, Continuity Plan, or whatever you will remember.
  2. While in this cloud drive, copy or scan all important documents, such as leases, insurance documents, building fire exit plans, local evacuation documents, personnel lists, equipment lists, passwords, etc. If you were to leave your office or home in five minutes or less, what information would you need.
    • If you don’t want your staff to have access to certain items, create a locked subfolder for those items.
  3. Create an Excel workbook in this folder that anyone can access. It should have tabs for all of your contacts – staff, clients, courthouses, opposing lawyers, vendors, etc. – anyone you would need to contact quickly if business operations were interrupted.
    • If you are using a case management system, you can export this information and place it in this folder. It is recommended to export in csv format to facilitate copy / paste of this information if you need to send mass email. Export this information at least once or twice a year.
    • Create tabs for equipment / devices, passwords.
  4. Have your staff go into this binder and enter their contact details, as well as emergency contacts and anyone they work with who would need to be contacted in the event of a disaster.
  5. Give them a deadline to complete this.

Now that you’ve completed the first section, you’ve got almost everything you really need to quickly pivot in a disaster. This next part is for when you have time to think about certain things or have a staff lunch or set aside time to look at things in more depth. These next few exercises will be the start of your threat index.

  1. Create a shared document in this shared cloud drive where you can braindump. You can even create a document for each person or staff member. The important thing is to have a place to write or type the next steps, much like a notepad.
  2. On this document (whether shared or on separate documents), make a list for each of the following (it doesn’t have to be perfect):
  • Which weather disasters most often affect your region (thunderstorms, earthquakes, hurricanes, etc.)?
  • What are the biggest threats in your area for man-made disasters (local nuclear power plant, large arena next door that could be a target for terrorism, etc.)?
  • If any businesses, schools, or businesses lost all of their data, information, or credentials, which would have the greatest impact on your ability to make money (banks, your children’s schools, your password manager? , whatever you rely more on)?
  • Which devices are most important to you and which ones contain all your important information like passwords, documents etc. ?
  • Who are the people in your office who have the most responsibility? Who is capable of doing each of these jobs? If there is no one who can perform a vital task, write it down as “high cost” in the next session.
  1. Combine the responses in each section and prioritize them according to “most likely to occur” and “highest cost / loss”. It is important that you have items from each category on your final list so that you are the best prepared.
  2. Take the first five to 10 elements and place each of them as a header on a document or create separate documents for each one. This is where you and your staff should write down your plans and ideas for what you would do (or how you would manage) if these things happened.

Now you have a list of all the people to contact in the event of a disaster, all your important documents in one place, a list of all your equipment and devices, and know what incidents you need to plan (those that cause the greatest threat to your life or livelihood).

Another good idea is to keep a running list of resources or references in this folder. It could even be another tab of the Excel workbook. Ideally, these would be resources that you know could be of use to you, your family, and your colleagues. I’ve placed lawyer-specific resources at the bottom of this article to help you get started.

The takeaways from this article are simple:

  • We’re good at helping our clients with their crises, but awful at planning when it happens to us.
  • Even if you are in a risk averse profession, you must have a plan that can be executed quickly.
  • Start placing documents, ideas, and contact information in a designated cloud drive.
  • Allow time to dive deep with your team once you have completed all of the numbered steps above.
  • Hire a disaster consultant to create plans for you or to review the plans you create. It’s important not to try to be the expert on everything – and often times, if you’re too close to the plan, you can’t see any gaps.

Let the past seek you out in the future. Have all your documents in one place, know how to contact people, and know the biggest threats to your business. Once these elements are completed and securely in a cloud drive accessible from anywhere, you have the foundation you need to dive into larger and more comprehensive continuity planning. Until then, however, having these items in one place and knowing that it is a team effort will give you greater peace of mind – and we can all use some of it these days.

Appendix A: Resources and References

Mental health resources for management and leadership of the practice of law:


Head (1)Brandy Mai is a graduate of Mitchell Hamline School of Law. The legal profession will be Brandy’s second career, as she has spent two decades working extensively in the areas of public information, crisis communications and emergency management. His experience includes working in the military / veteran / government, corporate, non-profit, emergency management, homeland security and public safety sectors, including a position as a public information officer for an emergency management agency in the state. Brandy’s certifications as an Emergency Manager and POST Instructor enable him to manage crises and teach public safety professionals how to coordinate information in an efficient and accessible manner during preparedness, response, recovery efforts. and mitigation. Brandy’s education includes training in military public affairs at the Defense Information School, a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Northwestern State University, and postgraduate courses in strategic communications from Purdue University. His JD will complement his work in crisis, disaster and communication situations. Brandy’s professional successes include a statewide Top 40 Under 40 award in Georgia for his public relations work with veteran nonprofits, contributions to an Emmy-winning project, and placement of a former Employer on the Inc. 5000 “Fastest Growing Company” list. Brandy is a mother of four and advocates for mental health, disabilities, veterans and children.


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Longtime Maslon lawyer prolific author David Herr dies – Minnesota lawyer https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/longtime-maslon-lawyer-prolific-author-david-herr-dies-minnesota-lawyer/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 06:39:49 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/longtime-maslon-lawyer-prolific-author-david-herr-dies-minnesota-lawyer/ Maslon’s longtime associate David F. Herr, considered a Minnesota law giant for his decades of highly respected work as an appellate and litigator in complex cases, legal educator and prolific author on the right, died. He was 71 years old. Herr’s passion for the law motivated him to seek to improve the profession and the […]]]>

Maslon’s longtime associate David F. Herr, considered a Minnesota law giant for his decades of highly respected work as an appellate and litigator in complex cases, legal educator and prolific author on the right, died. He was 71 years old.

Herr’s passion for the law motivated him to seek to improve the profession and the practice, said Roger Haydock, professor of law at Mitchell Hamline School of Law. Haydock had been a friend of Herr’s since Herr’s days as a student at the former William Mitchell College of Law in the mid-1970s. Herr then served the school as an assistant professor for over 30 years.

“He has an exceptional history of being such an accomplished lawyer,” said Haydock. “I imagine every courtroom in this state and every law firm in this state has books that David wrote that lawyers rely on. There are perhaps over 1.2 million attorneys in the United States and most of them are litigators. The majority of them have used one or more of his books over the decades, so he has that remarkable legacy in that way. “

Diagnosed with ALS

Herr, who had been diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig’s disease, died on December 22. A memorial is planned for the spring at the House of Hope Presbyterian Church in St. Paul. Herr this month was named the 2021 attorney of the year for outstanding service to the profession by the Minnesota attorney. In recognition of Herr’s contributions from the capital, St. Paul Mayor Melvin Carter proclaimed December 3 David F. Herr Day. A celebration for all of his achievements was held in his honor on this day.

In over 43 years of practice, Herr has written over 15 important books on state and federal law while mentoring hundreds of lawyers and helping to draft and amend the rules governing civil practice as a long-time journalist. date for several Minnesota Supreme Court advisory committees.

Minnesota Supreme Court Justice G. Barry Anderson called Herr “one of Minnesota’s legal giants” for his “tremendous contributions to the practice of law and to the state of Minnesota.” Herr’s efforts in the advisory committee included serving as rapporteur for the general rules of practice of the district court committee from July 1982 to the present day.

“The common thread through everything he did was a sense of professionalism,” Anderson said in a transcript of his comments at the event celebrating Herr’s accomplishments. “The preamble to the (American Bar Association) Model Rules of Professional Conduct states that in all professional functions a lawyer should be competent, prompt and diligent; I think that’s a pretty good testament to who David Herr is.

“Unprecedented” service to Supreme Court committees

Eric Magnuson, former chief justice of the Minnesota Supreme Court and now a partner at Robins Kaplan, said Herr’s work on the rules of court committees “is, to my knowledge, completely unprecedented.”

“Few lawyers have contributed as much in their careers as David did through his selfless service to the bench and to the bar,” said Magnuson. “He has been the deferral of most of the major advances in civil rules, both in the courts of first instance and in the courts of appeal, over the past three decades. … David really loved the law and he loved helping the law work the way it was meant to work.

Herr’s writing mantra: “Make this useful”

While Magnuson was “really getting into the weeds of things,” when they wrote together, Herr “brought me closer to the surface and said,” It’s really interesting that you know every detail of this rule. But we have to make it practical, we have to make it useful for the practitioner. It was his mantra, we have to make it useful.

Herr served on Maslon’s governance committee for six years and as general counsel for more than 25 years during his four decades of practice with the firm.

“David has made Maslon a better place through the quality of his lawyer, his role in running the firm and his unwavering support for the firm’s young lawyers,” said Mike McCarthy, chair of the firm’s governance committee, in a statement. communicated. “The accolades he has received for his legal work speak for themselves, but the best measure of his contributions may be the lasting mark he has left on those who have been fortunate enough to work with him. “

Herr graduated from William Mitchell College of Law in 1978. A Hennepin County judge impressed with Herr’s work as a student lawyer advised a firm he had applied to “hire David Herr.” Herr joined Maslon three years later, regularly arguing cases before the Minnesota Courts of Appeal and the 8th United States Court of Appeals. He has served as President of the American Academy of Appellate Lawyers and President of the Academy of Court Appointed Masters, among other leadership roles he has assumed in advancing the legal profession.

Herr has written several editions of the Mannotated Manual for Complex Litigation Fourth and the Multidistrict Litigation Manual: Practice before the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation, published by Thomson West; co-author of Appellate Rules Annotated, Minnesota Practice Series, Minnesota’s premier treatise on appellate law and practice; co-author of the Minnesota Appellate Procedure Summary Guide and the Minnesota Evidence Rules Summary Guide for Minnesota CLE; was the original author and publisher of 1994 and subsequently continued to edit several editions of the Eighth Circuit Appeal Practice Manual for the Minnesota CLE; and co-author of the Minnesota CLE Eighth Circuit Appeal Summary.

Herr co-founded and served on the board of directors of the Minnesota Supreme Court Historical Society; chaired the board of directors of the United Hospital Foundation; and served on the board of the Minnesota Innocence Project.

Focus on mentoring

As a mentor, Herr often invited lawyers to collaborate on articles, books, and court cases. Maslon partner Erica Holzer, whom Herr mentored, said Herr often sidesteps to provide opportunities for newer or younger lawyers.

“He really cared about teaching lawyers how to be good lawyers,” Holzer said. “He was just incredibly generous in that regard. I would say probably because that’s what he saw as part of his responsibility as a lawyer, which I hope to pursue. “

Mitchell Hamline President and Dean Emeritus Eric Janus said Herr’s legacy combines writing and advocacy from a lawyer “who enjoys the legal profession and is committed to sharing his knowledge and expertise. expertise in the broad sense. “

Herr’s motivation to do so, Janus said, stemmed “from a dedication to the profession and raising the level of professionalism among layers and also from dedication to the community, understanding that lawyers greatly contribute to the quality of the profession. civic life in our community and the higher the level of professionalism and competence, the better.

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