Hamline Committee – Hamline Midway History http://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 10:41:48 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/hamline-midway-history-icon-150x150.jpg Hamline Committee – Hamline Midway History http://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/ 32 32 Linda ODEGARD Obituary (2021) – Minneapolis, MN https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/linda-odegard-obituary-2021-minneapolis-mn/ Sun, 19 Sep 2021 03:34:21 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/linda-odegard-obituary-2021-minneapolis-mn/ The 72-year-old, from Minneapolis, died on September 14, 2021, ten months after being diagnosed with lung cancer. May the memory of his luminous life be a consolation for all who loved him. Linda Christine Carlson was born April 8, 1949 to Harry and Marian Carlson of St. Paul, and spent her childhood in the supportive […]]]>
The 72-year-old, from Minneapolis, died on September 14, 2021, ten months after being diagnosed with lung cancer. May the memory of his luminous life be a consolation for all who loved him. Linda Christine Carlson was born April 8, 1949 to Harry and Marian Carlson of St. Paul, and spent her childhood in the supportive embrace of Highland Park. She graduated from Highland Park High School and Gustavus Adolphus College and did graduate studies at Hamline University and the University of Paris (Sorbonne). She taught French at the Breck School in the 1970s and led groups of students on summer trips to France. She married Stephen J. Odegard and moved with him to his hometown of Princeton, Minnesota, where they operated Odegard family businesses, a car dealership and a fleet of school buses, and Linda taught literacy skills to adults. They have helped liven up the Princeton scene for nearly a quarter of a century. After Steve’s untimely death in 1996, Linda returned to the Twin Cities and settled in a condominium overlooking downtown Minneapolis and the historic St. Anthony Falls on the Mississippi River. She found love a second time when she met Harlan Cavert in 1999 and married him in 2001, and they celebrated their 20th anniversary last June. After her teaching career, Linda flourished as a volunteer member of the boards and committees of various not-for-profit organizations related to education, health and the arts. She was a frequent traveler of the world, a committed walker and a fan of the New York Times crossword. Linda was predeceased by: her parents, Harry and Marian; her husband Steve; his parents, Robert and Barbara Odegard; and the parents of Harlan, Mead and June Cavert. She is survived by: her husband, Harlan Cavert; her children and their spouses, William Cavert and Kathryn Wegner of St. Paul and Elizabeth and Nicholas Scheibel of Minneapolis; adored grandchildren, Diana Cavert and Samuel Cavert; her brother, Charles Carlson of California; his niece, Christine Beauchemin of New York, and the family of Christine, Colin, Sam and Oscar; Harlan’s brother and family, Winston Cavert, Carol Witte, Elspeth Cavert and Johan Cavert of Minneapolis; his darling coterie of Princeton buddies; his loyal friends in the sobriety community; and countless others who flourished in the warmth of its sun. Special thanks to Dr. John Seng and his team at Minnesota Oncology, the dedicated staff at Abbott-Northwestern Hospital and the Allina Health Palliative Home Care Program, and the knowledgeable and compassionate caregivers of Grace A Team. A commemorative rally will be scheduled at a later date. Contact: [email protected] Memorial gifts are preferred at Literacy Minnesota, the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, and the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum.

Published by Pioneer Press on September 19, 2021.


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Obituary of Richard Fredricks (1939 – 2021) – Kimberly, WI https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/obituary-of-richard-fredricks-1939-2021-kimberly-wi/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 20:02:25 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/obituary-of-richard-fredricks-1939-2021-kimberly-wi/ Richard E. Fredricks, of Appleton, Wisconsin, died on September 14, 2021 at the age of 82.Dick was born February 10, 1939 in Janesville, Wisconsin, son of Arthur and Julia Fredricks. He married Annemarie (née Sladky) on February 5, 1966.Dick is survived by his patient and understanding widow, Annemarie, Appleton; six children, Elizabeth (Roger Palecek), Cottage […]]]>

Richard E. Fredricks, of Appleton, Wisconsin, died on September 14, 2021 at the age of 82.
Dick was born February 10, 1939 in Janesville, Wisconsin, son of Arthur and Julia Fredricks. He married Annemarie (née Sladky) on February 5, 1966.
Dick is survived by his patient and understanding widow, Annemarie, Appleton; six children, Elizabeth (Roger Palecek), Cottage Grove, Wisconsin; Susan, Downingtown, Pennsylvania; Steven (Sarah), Madison, Wisconsin; Arthur, Edwards, Colorado; Matthew (Lisa), Oconomowoc, Wisconsin; Margaret, “Peggy” (Phil Boardman), Helsinki, Finland, and five granddaughters, Sydney Fredricks, Hannah Linke. Alexandria Linke, Emily Fredricks and Madeline Fredricks, and a grandson, Maxwell Fredricks.
He was predeceased by an older brother, Irvin (sudden infant death syndrome, 1937), his father (1941) and his mother (2001).
Dick has been involved in several community and national activities, including the Czechs in Wisconsin.
Dick was very proud of his children’s pursuit of excellence. All of the children graduated from college: Elizabeth, BA University of Kentucky; Susan, BA University of Iowa, MA Seton Hall University, Ph.D. University of Kansas; Steven, BA Marquette University, JD Hamline School of Law; Arthur, BA University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; Matthew, BA University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, MA University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee; and Peggy, BA Mount Holyoke College, MSc and Dr.Rer.Nat. Techische Universität München (Germany).
During his formative years, Dick was influenced by his uncles and aunts who became his surrogate siblings. A close extended family includes many cousins ​​and their children.
Dick grew up in Milwaukee, graduated from Custer High School, where he met his future wife; attended Marquette University where he obtained his BS and MS degrees in chemistry; and did graduate studies at Purdue University and Carnegie-Mellon University. With his wife and daughter, he moved to Appleton in 1968 after accepting a professorship in the Department of Chemistry at Lawrence University. In 1969, Dick accepted a position with American Can Company, Neenah, in the analytical chemistry group and also worked in the packaging product development group. Without. move Dick worked for American Can Company, James River Corporation; Fort James and Georgia-Pacific. He has been the co-inventor of five patents, author of several articles published in the chemical literature and lecturer at seminars organized by the American Chemical Society, TAPPI and the Society of Plastics Engineers.
He was active in the Saint-Bernard Catholic Church as a representative of the vicariate, member of the church council; reader and mass servant with his children. He actively participated in several Bible study courses at Saint-Bernard Church and Saint-Pie XI Church.
Dick was very active in sports arbitration. He has officiated high school, college and semi-professional football and high school and college basketball. He was the referee of three WIAA State Tournament football and the referee of two high school All-Star football games. Dick founded the Fox Cities ‘Officials’ Association (1969) and has served on several occasions as Secretary, Treasurer, Games Coordinator, Vice President and President of FCOA; played a decisive role in the renumbering of situations in the national federation case reports (1976); worked on the revision of the NF and NCAA football penalty signals table (1980); served on the WIAA Officials Advisory Committee (1982-1984), during which time the officials classification system was reorganized; was a basketball and football columnist for Referee magazine (1981-1986); was a speaker at the congresses of national federations (1983-1988); was a member of the editorial board of the National Federation’s Officials’ Quarterly (1995-2000), including during the founding of the magazine, and has published extensively there; author or co-author of several official books; served to revise football exams written by the national federation; and has been a speaker and advisor for arbitration clinics held in the Fox Cities and Green Bay. Locally, Dick was a member of the “Red” Smith Committee. He served on the Sports Committee of the Fox Cities Convention and Visitors Bureau, where he was the spokesperson for all officials. Dick has been especially blessed to have been associated with honorable and honest ladies and gentlemen of the highest caliber in his officiating and community activities.
A funeral mass will be celebrated for Dick at 4 pm on Thursday, October 7, 2021 at St. Bernard Catholic Church, 1600 W. Pine St., Appleton. Family and friends will be received at the church from 2 p.m. until mass. The entombment will take place at 11 am on Saturday, October 9, 2021 at the Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery and Mausoleum, 7301 W. Nash St., Milwaukee.
In lieu of flowers, donations can be made in Dick’s memory to JDF International by clicking the memorial donation button above.
Dick’s family would like to warmly thank all of his caregivers at Touchmark, Senior Living and Heartland Home Hospice for the warm and compassionate care they have provided to him.
Please leave a special message or condolences for his family below.

Posted by Wichmann Funeral Home – Downtown Appleton on Sep 18, 2021.


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Obituary of Jean DONALDSON (1925 – 2021) – St. Paul, MN https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/obituary-of-jean-donaldson-1925-2021-st-paul-mn/ Fri, 17 Sep 2021 03:40:40 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/obituary-of-jean-donaldson-1925-2021-st-paul-mn/ Passed away peacefully on Saturday, September 11, 2021 at the age of 96, after a long and eventful life. Born in Boone, Iowa on February 15, 1925, she and her late husband (WD “Chris” Donaldson) had resided in St. Paul, MN since 1959. Jean was residing at Saint Anthony Park Home at the time of […]]]>
Passed away peacefully on Saturday, September 11, 2021 at the age of 96, after a long and eventful life. Born in Boone, Iowa on February 15, 1925, she and her late husband (WD “Chris” Donaldson) had resided in St. Paul, MN since 1959. Jean was residing at Saint Anthony Park Home at the time of her death. Jean was a 1946 graduate of Iowa State University, and from her beloved small town life through many moves and trips around the world, she balanced her family, career, and service to her community for many. decades. Jean has forged her professional career in healthcare, as a registered dietitian, nursing home administrator, teacher, and executive director of health facility complaints for the state of Minnesota, among other positions. Deeply involved in his community, John has served on the boards and committees of the American Red Cross, St. Paul’s Community Council, PEO, local arts councils, the Hamline United Methodist Church and many others. In retirement, Jean became an accomplished artist, and her evocative and dreamy watercolors, many of which depicted her beloved North Woods, have been featured in local art exhibitions and galleries. Jean will always be loved and remembered for his sense of whimsy, his compassionate and open heart, his dedication to family and his desire for social justice. She championed education and opportunities for the less privileged. She and her husband Chris were deeply devoted to their beloved dogs rescued and adopted over the years. Jean is survived by his son and daughter-in-law, Eric and Susan Donaldson, of St. Paul; daughter Ann Donaldson Hazen of New York; sister Maxine Redeker of Boone, Iowa; granddaughters Jennifer and Jessica Donaldson of St. Paul; and niece and nephew Ellen and Joe Redeker, among others. We, his family and loved ones, know without a doubt that John – wife, mother, sister, aunt, grandmother, neighbor, teacher, devoted friend – has arrived safely and passed through the gates of Heaven, and is greeted with a eternal joy by all those dear ones who came before her and who now welcome her to her home.

Published by Pioneer Press September 17-19, 2021.


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The State of Resilience: Critical Infrastructure and the 9/11 Commission Report https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/the-state-of-resilience-critical-infrastructure-and-the-9-11-commission-report/ Tue, 14 Sep 2021 15:35:43 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/the-state-of-resilience-critical-infrastructure-and-the-9-11-commission-report/ September 11, 2001 changed everything. I have the honor to work with homeland security professionals who have felt called to serve in the wake of this tragic day. Reflecting on the ‘State of the Union’ 20 years later with regard to physical security and cybersecurity, I see the 9/11 Commission report as the vision document […]]]>

September 11, 2001 changed everything. I have the honor to work with homeland security professionals who have felt called to serve in the wake of this tragic day. Reflecting on the ‘State of the Union’ 20 years later with regard to physical security and cybersecurity, I see the 9/11 Commission report as the vision document for global homeland security. post September 11.

In response to the attacks, Congress instructed the National Biparty Commission on the Terrorist Attacks on the United States (September 11 Commission) in 2002 “to prepare a full and comprehensive account of the circumstances surrounding the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001,” including preparedness for and immediate response to attacks. (https://www.9-11commission.gov/)

The founding principles of the United States are part of what makes America special and unique. At the same time, these principles have also created silos that play a role in homeland security efforts. As established in the Constitution, government has been intentionally structured with separation between federal, state and local governments, as well as between branches of government. The 9/11 report exposed these silos and challenged everyone within the homeland security enterprise, including elected officials, to find ways to work together to improve information sharing and collaboration. at all levels of government. The following sections are part of the text of the 9/11 report as it relates to infrastructure and cybersecurity, as well as collaboration between all levels of government and the private sector.

Extracts from the public statement of the 9/11 Commission report, July 22, 2004 (https://govinfo.library.unt.edu/911/report/911Report_Statement.pdf)

  • At home, we must establish clear priorities for the protection of our infrastructure and the safety of our transport. Resources should be allocated according to these priorities and standards of readiness should be established. The private sector and local governments should play an important role in this process.
  • If, God forbid, there is another attack, we must be prepared to respond. We need to educate the public, train and equip our first responders, and anticipate countless scenarios.
  • The most important failure was that of the imagination.

Extracts from the summary of the 9/11 Commission report (https://govinfo.library.unt.edu/911/report/911Report_Exec.pdf)

  • The missed opportunities to foil the 9/11 conspiracy were also symptoms of a broader inability to adapt the way government deals with problems to the new challenges of the 21st century.
  • Unit of effort: information sharing. The US government has access to a great deal of information. But he has a weak system for processing and using what he has. The “need to know” system should be replaced by a “need to share” system

The above-mentioned report recommendations were based on the National Infrastructure Protection Plan. Two years after the Commission’s report on September 11, the first national infrastructure protection plan was published (https://www.dhs.gov/xlibrary/assets/NIPP_Plan_noApps.pdf). Since 2006, the National Infrastructure Protection Plan has been completed and updated and is currently being updated (https://www.cisa.gov/national-infrastructure-protection-plan). This plan defines the framework and priorities for cybersecurity and infrastructure security. In addition, the plan established various groups within the Federal Government (Government Coordinating Boards) and the public and private sectors (Sector Risk Management Agencies). These various stakeholder engagement groups are intended to help work across different sectors and levels of government to share information, improve coordination, and strengthen our country’s capacity to prepare for and respond to any dangers.

The vast majority of critical infrastructure is owned and operated by local governments and the private sector. As such, these professionals are on the front line for the protection and resilience of their critical infrastructures. This responsibility for investments in protection and resilience at the local level is similar to how disaster response is executed locally, coordinated by the state and supported by the federal government. While federal and state governments are essential partners in these security efforts, local and private sector agencies must be intentional and proactive in their roles for the security and response of physical and cyber infrastructure.

“A universal action for all professionals in the public service is to build trust between other groups and individuals involved in cybersecurity and infrastructure security”

Professionals in the public service, public or private, must be mindful of the responsibility for safety and not become complacent. Whether in the design, construction, operation or maintenance of physical or IT infrastructure, everyone in these positions has a role to play in homeland security. Some of the activities within a given sector may be considered “normal”, but on closer examination these activities also have elements of resilience and should be understood as such. Professionals in the cyber and physical infrastructure profession must continue to work together and be determined to improve the security and resilience of the nation’s critical infrastructure. The federal government has invested millions of dollars in the development of critical infrastructure security resources to help SLTT and the efforts of private sector professionals to improve security and resiliency. Being busy and having multiple roles is a reality that all organizations and professionals face, but it cannot be an excuse for inaction or non-engagement with available federal resources (usually at no cost). An element of universal action for all professionals in the public service is to build trust between other groups and individuals involved in cybersecurity and infrastructure security. Building and maintaining trust, and all that goes into that, is an essential part of homeland security efforts and is a basic need. Critical infrastructure professionals owe it to their communities, and the nation as a whole, to be intentional in the use of federal resources, the implementation of mitigation measures, the strengthening of critical assets, the improvement of response capacities, responsible information sharing and capacity building to manage problems and threats.

In their closing public statement on the 9/11 Commission Report, the Honorable Thomas H. Kean and the Honorable Lee H. Hamilton said, “We believe that by acting together we can make a difference. . We can make our nation safer and more secure. I think their comments are just as true today as they were on July 22, 2004. Let us all respond to the calls to action contained in the 9/11 Commission report by building on the framework and priorities of the National Infrastructure Protection Plan and being intentional on building partnerships, information sharing and collaboration to improve the readiness and resiliency of IT and infrastructure systems in the United States of America.


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Minnesota businesses await more advice following Biden vaccine mandate https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/minnesota-businesses-await-more-advice-following-biden-vaccine-mandate/ Fri, 10 Sep 2021 15:48:56 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/minnesota-businesses-await-more-advice-following-biden-vaccine-mandate/ item President Joe Biden provides details on his COVID-19 response plan. MINNEAPOLIS (FOX 9) – President Joe Biden has announced COVID-19 vaccine mandates as part of his latest response plan, but Minnesota business owners are still waiting for more guidance as the dust settles. Part of that mandate states that all employers with more than […]]]>

President Joe Biden provides details on his COVID-19 response plan.

President Joe Biden has announced COVID-19 vaccine mandates as part of his latest response plan, but Minnesota business owners are still waiting for more guidance as the dust settles.

Part of that mandate states that all employers with more than 100 workers must require vaccinations or tests for the virus every week. According to the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development, more than 4,800 businesses and 1.4 million employees could be affected by this.

Nationwide lawsuits challenging that mandate are already underway, including one by the Republican National Committee.

Meanwhile, many companies are eager to hear the details of the plan. Minnesota Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Doug Loon said he and thousands of Minnesota businesses are awaiting details on the president’s vaccine tenure as they already consider health from their place of work.

“But it adds a new level of complexity to it and a burden on businesses at a time when they are really focused on getting back to business,” Loon said.

Loon says he’s also monitoring to see if court challenges are holding back the tenure.

However, Professor David Larson of the Mitchell Hamline School of Law says that due to federal workplace safety laws under the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the president has legal status to issue a warrant.

“Since we are in a public health emergency, given that the government has policing powers, given that we have current federal law that says we can compel employers to provide a safe workplace, I think we have the legal authority to do so, ”Larson said.

Either way, the president’s tenure is likely to be challenged in court. Local employment attorney Marshall Tanick says that since the start of the pandemic, he has seen several lawsuits filed by companies trying to end COVID-19 warrants.

“The lawsuits have been numerous and they have been very unsuccessful overall, including the ones here in Minnesota,” Tanick said.

Similar to these cases, he expects lawsuits brought by individuals or unions to have a better chance of winning in court.

“I imagine that if there is any litigation, most of that litigation will be an attempt to stop the implementation of the president’s order,” Tanick said.

A lawsuit could end this mandate before it is implemented. It is not known when all of this might take effect.


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Minnesota companies expect more advice following Biden vaccine mandate https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/minnesota-companies-expect-more-advice-following-biden-vaccine-mandate/ Fri, 10 Sep 2021 12:23:02 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/minnesota-companies-expect-more-advice-following-biden-vaccine-mandate/ MINNEAPOLIS (FOX 9) – President Joe Biden has announced COVID-19 vaccine mandates as part of his latest response plan, but Minnesota business owners still await more guidance as the dust settles. President Joe Biden provides details on his COVID-19 response plan. Minnesota businesses await more advice following Biden vaccine mandate Part of that mandate states […]]]>

MINNEAPOLIS (FOX 9) – President Joe Biden has announced COVID-19 vaccine mandates as part of his latest response plan, but Minnesota business owners still await more guidance as the dust settles. President Joe Biden provides details on his COVID-19 response plan.

Minnesota businesses await more advice following Biden vaccine mandate

Part of that mandate states that all employers with more than 100 workers must require vaccinations or tests for the virus every week. According to the Minnesota Department of Employment and Economic Development, more than 4,800 businesses and 1.4 million employees could be affected by this.

President Joe Biden has announced COVID-19 vaccine mandates as part of his latest response plan, but Minnesota business owners are still waiting for more guidance as the dust settles.

Nationwide lawsuits challenging that mandate are already underway, including one by the Republican National Committee.

Meanwhile, many companies are eager to hear the details of the plan. Minnesota Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Doug Loon said he and thousands of Minnesota businesses are awaiting details on the president’s vaccine tenure as they already consider health from their place of work.

“But it adds a new level of complexity to it and a burden on businesses at a time when they are really focused on getting back to business,” Loon said.

However, Professor David Larson of the Mitchell Hamline School of Law says that due to federal workplace safety laws under the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the president has a legal status to issue a warrant.

Loon says he’s also monitoring to see if court challenges are holding back the tenure.

“Since we are in a public health emergency, given that the government has policing powers, given that we have current federal law that says we can compel employers to provide a safe workplace, I think we have the legal authority to do so, ”Larson said.

Either way, the president’s tenure is likely to be challenged in court. Local employment attorney Marshall Tanick says that since the start of the pandemic, he has seen several lawsuits filed by companies trying to end COVID-19 warrants.

“The lawsuits have been numerous and they have been very unsuccessful overall, including the ones here in Minnesota,” Tanick said.

Similar to these cases, he expects lawsuits brought by individuals or unions to have a better chance of winning in court.

“I imagine that if there is a dispute, most of that litigation will be an attempt to stop the implementation of the president’s order,” Tanick said.

A lawsuit could end this mandate before it is implemented. It is not known when all of this might take effect.

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Process Begins to Fill Minnesota Supreme Court Vacancy | New https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/process-begins-to-fill-minnesota-supreme-court-vacancy-new/ Wed, 08 Sep 2021 19:55:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/process-begins-to-fill-minnesota-supreme-court-vacancy-new/ WASHINGTON – Today, U.S. Senators Amy Klobuchar and Tina Smith announced the formation of a judicial selection committee to help them make recommendations to President Biden to fill a vacant position in the Minnesota Federal District Court. The vacant position was created by Judge Susan Richard Nelson’s decision to assume senior management status. The committee […]]]>

WASHINGTON – Today, U.S. Senators Amy Klobuchar and Tina Smith announced the formation of a judicial selection committee to help them make recommendations to President Biden to fill a vacant position in the Minnesota Federal District Court. The vacant position was created by Judge Susan Richard Nelson’s decision to assume senior management status.

The committee will include Alan Page, former associate justice of the Minnesota Supreme Court and assistant attorney general; Leslie Beiers, Associate Chief Justice of the Sixth Judicial Circuit of Minnesota and former Deputy District Attorney for St. Louis County; Arielle Wagner, partner at Lockridge Grindal Nauen PLLP and president of the Minnesota American Indian Bar Association; Miguel Pozo, senior vice president, general counsel and compliance officer of Minnesota Community Care, and past president of the Hispanic National Bar Association; and Peter Knapp, professor and former interim president and dean of the Mitchell Hamline School of Law.

“These distinguished leaders from Minnesota will come together to find a lawyer to continue our state’s long tradition of federal judges with varied backgrounds who have proven to be fair, conscientious and even diligent in their law enforcement.” Klobuchar said. “I want to thank Justice Nelson for her service to Minnesota and to federal justice, which spanned more than two decades after serving as a trial judge.”

“Federal judges are appointed for life, which is why it is essential that they have an unwavering commitment to equal justice for all under the law” she concludes.

“I am delighted that this diverse selection committee made up of dedicated Minnesotans has agreed to help us make recommendations throughout this process,” Smith said. “I want to thank Judge Susan Richard Nelson for her service to our state, and I have no doubt that this group of leaders will recommend potential candidates who are up to the challenge of filling this position and serving Minnesota.”

Those wishing to be considered for the post of judge, United States District Court for the District of Minnesota, must submit a letter of interest and curriculum vitae by September 22, 2021 to the Judicial Selection Committee, Senator’s Office Amy Klobuchar, 1200 Washington Avenue. South, Suite 250, Minneapolis, MN, 55415. Documents can also be emailed to the Committee at MNCommittee@judiciary-dem.senate.gov. References will be requested at a later date during the interview process.


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SJU’s long-awaited cross-country opening set for Saturday morning https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/sjus-long-awaited-cross-country-opening-set-for-saturday-morning/ Fri, 03 Sep 2021 16:19:10 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/sjus-long-awaited-cross-country-opening-set-for-saturday-morning/ History links The Saint John’s Cross Country Team kicks off their 2021 season with a Triangle match against the St. Cloud State Division II Club team and Trinity Bible (ND) at 10 a.m. on Saturday, September 4 at Boulder Ridge GC in St. Cloud. LONG TO COME: Saturday’s season opener is the Johnnies’ first cross-country […]]]>

The Saint John’s Cross Country Team kicks off their 2021 season with a Triangle match against the St. Cloud State Division II Club team and Trinity Bible (ND) at 10 a.m. on Saturday, September 4 at Boulder Ridge GC in St. Cloud.

LONG TO COME: Saturday’s season opener is the Johnnies’ first cross-country competition since the 2019 NCAA Central Regional, where SJU placed ninth out of 28 teams. It is a period of 658 days.

A LOOK AT THE JOHNNIES: Each team, including Saint John’s, entered seven runners for the 2019 NCAA Regional Championship held Nov. 16 at the Wartburg campus in Waverly, Iowa. The Johnnies are dismissing five of the seven, which were all subclasses (freshmen or sophomores), as of this day. Junior Tom nemanich (Red Wing, Minn.) Finished 50th, followed by seniors Dillon Diekmann (Lake Elmo, Minn./Cretin-Derham Hall) in 56th and senior Andy Goldsmith (Tulsa, Okla./Cascia Hall) in 64th. Junior Mitch Great (Hutchinson, Minn.) And senior Justus Fast (Reno, Nev./Galena) completed the seven Johnnies in 111th and 112th, respectively. Absent from this team was junior Lloyd young (Bloomington, Minn./Kennedy), who was All-Region indoor in the 5,000-meter and placed second in that event at the Elite Division III Indoor Championships last winter / spring. He finished fifth in the 5k and sixth in the 10k at the MIAC Outdoor Championships in May.

NEW REGION: The NCAA Division III Men’s and Women’s Cross Country Track and Field Committee, as well as the Division III Championships Committee, approved a new 10-region realignment model for cross-country on July 8. . The new northern region includes SJU and MIAC, as well as such as UMAC, WIAC and Wisconsin private schools.

REGIONAL RANKS: SJU was ranked # 9 out of 10 teams in the United States Track and Field and Cross Country Coaching Association’s North Region Rankings released on August 24.

1. Wisconsin-La Crosse
2. Wisconsin-Whitewater
3. Wisconsin-Eau Claire
4. Saint-Olaf
5. Wisconsin-Oshkosh
6. Wisconsin-Stout
7. Carleton
8. Gustave Adolphe
9. SJU
10. Carthage (Wisdom)

SEASON NO. 43: The 2021 cross country season is the 43rd for Tim miles as the Johnnies Cross Country Head Coach. Miles’ cross country program has finished among the top two MIAC teams in 24 of the past 41 seasons, including nine MIAC titles (1981, 1982, 1983, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2006 and 2007). He had 22 cross-country teams qualified for the national competition, with 17 top-15 finishes. The Johnnies have 36 top-eight rankings in their last 39 NCAA Central Regional Championships (dating back to 1982), including five titles and 25 top-five rankings.

THE REST OF THE SCHEDULE: The Johnnies return to action in two weeks (September 18) at the St. Olaf Invitational and continue a sort of MIAC tour with the Hamline Invitational two weeks later (October 1). SJU will split into two games in mid-October, the Crown Invitational (October 15) and the Lewis and Clark (Ore.) Invitational (October 16), before the MIAC Championship on October 30 in St. Olaf. The Johnnies host the annual Fall Finals on Nov. 5 at the new NCAA North Regional Competition on Nov. 13 in Colfax, Wisconsin. The 2021 NCAA Division III Championship takes place on November 20 in Louisville, Ky.


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From September 1, masks are mandatory for everyone on campus – News and Events https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/from-september-1-masks-are-mandatory-for-everyone-on-campus-news-and-events/ Mon, 30 Aug 2021 18:06:04 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/from-september-1-masks-are-mandatory-for-everyone-on-campus-news-and-events/ Mitchell Hamline institutes a mask requirement for everyone on campus effective September 1, 2021.Below is a message from Dean Anthony Niedwiecki and the management team announcing the change. August 30, 2021 Dear teachers and staff – Thank you for all you have done this fall to help us get back to campus safely. On our […]]]>

Mitchell Hamline institutes a mask requirement for everyone on campus effective September 1, 2021.
Below is a message from Dean Anthony Niedwiecki and the management team announcing the change.

August 30, 2021

Dear teachers and staff –

Thank you for all you have done this fall to help us get back to campus safely. On our most important measure – the COVID-19 cases on campus – we are succeeding (knock on wood.) We had no reported cases on campus this fall.

But there are troubling signs we want to respond to before they start to affect the health of our community. Ramsey County now has high levels of community transmission, as tracked by the CDC. Community transmission has increased dramatically nationwide over the past 4-6 weeks as communities grapple with the highly contagious and dangerous delta variant. The severity of this trend is also evidenced by an increase in hospitalizations and a corresponding decrease in beds available for COVID-19 patients. While we hoped that a “strong recommendation” for mask wear that we put out in our fall campus plan would be sufficient, with the level of spread in Ramsey County, we believe it is important. to review these guidelines.

We said in this fall plan that we would reinstate a mask requirement if conditions warranted. For the above reasons, with the support of our COVID-19 committee and following the recommendation of our medical consultant and advice from the CDC, we are implementing a mask requirement effective Wednesday, September 1, as follows :

  • Everyone must wear a mask at all times in the building, except in individual offices with a door (preferably closed).
    Note: Teachers may remove their masks during class, if necessary, provided they take all reasonable steps to stay physically away from students. Professors who co-teach should both be masked.
  • All visitors to the building must wear a mask.
  • Masks can be removed when eating and drinking. When eating and drinking near others, it is best to be outdoors or in large, open spaces to allow sufficient air circulation. If this is not possible, please maintain as much distance as possible.

Additional information on the masks is provided by the Minnesota Department of Health and the CDC. Information on Mitchell Hamline’s COVID-19 compliance policy can be found in the student catalog.

Although the vaccination rate in Ramsey County for ages 12 and over is nearly 70% and the law school requires all faculty, staff and students on campus to be vaccinated, we must continue to use all available tools to limit the impact of this virus. We hope that the addition of a mask requirement will further reduce the threat of transmission within our university community during this very difficult time. If we can manage to keep our case count very low and the Ramsey County data moves in a positive direction, we expect to be able to adjust this requirement based on the size of the room and the number of people in a room. room.

It is likely that some of the trends we have cited above will soon push us from level 1 (“low”) to level 2 (“medium”) on our campus alert scale. This will result in additional restrictions which we will highlight at this time. But before that, we are implementing the mask requirement in order to continue all level 1 activities for as long as possible and reduce the possibilities of any case on campus.

Thank you for your continued commitment to keeping this community safe, and don’t hesitate to contact us if you have any questions.

Truly,

Anthony Niedwiecki
President and Dean

on behalf of the management team:

Michael birchard
Lynette Fraction
Mike Freer
Anne Gemmel
Jim hilbert
Stephen kent
Lynn LeMoine
Chris Szaj
Leslie Wright


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Hamline Church Dining Hall, Minnesota State Fair’s Oldest Food Concession, to Close Indoor Dining – WCCO https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/hamline-church-dining-hall-minnesota-state-fairs-oldest-food-concession-to-close-indoor-dining-wcco/ Tue, 24 Aug 2021 13:00:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/hamline-church-dining-hall-minnesota-state-fairs-oldest-food-concession-to-close-indoor-dining-wcco/ MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) – The Minnesota State Fair’s oldest food concession is revamping its menu in a big way this year. The Hamline Church Dining Room, which is in its 124th year at the Great Minnesota Get-Together, announced Monday that it will only serve ice cream through window service, and its dining room will be closed […]]]>


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