Hamline Committee – Hamline Midway History http://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 20:28:37 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/08/hamline-midway-history-icon-150x150.jpg Hamline Committee – Hamline Midway History http://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/ 32 32 Homophobic incident sparks institutional conversation – The Oracle https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/homophobic-incident-sparks-institutional-conversation-the-oracle/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 18:58:42 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/homophobic-incident-sparks-institutional-conversation-the-oracle/ Content Warning: Details of Violent and Homophobic Messages A student from Hamline was shocked to find homophobic hate speech scribbled on a desk in his classroom at the Klas Center earlier this month. The class taught by Laura Dougherty, an assistant professor for the theater arts department, was discussing the empowerment of the portrayal of […]]]>

Content Warning: Details of Violent and Homophobic Messages

A student from Hamline was shocked to find homophobic hate speech scribbled on a desk in his classroom at the Klas Center earlier this month.

The class taught by Laura Dougherty, an assistant professor for the theater arts department, was discussing the empowerment of the portrayal of love and intimacy between same-sex partners in the play “Angels in America” ​​when the harsh writing was found during a November 3 class period.

“As we were discussing that this is a radically political act in art, someone raised their hand and said, ‘Laura? On the table in front of me it says… ‘kill all the gays’ [and] the piece stood still,” Dougherty said.

When it was discovered, Dougherty decided to keep the class and space together, given what they were talking about.

Since the incident, Dougherty, who teaches this introductory theater course, has worked with Hamline administrative staff to formulate an email response to all undergraduate students.

Charlie VanGuilder, a Hamline junior in Dougherty’s class, says the class pulled the message off the table after discovering it.

“It was a very shocking thing to see at a university like this where we are so inclusive, open and supportive. But when something like this happens, it made me wonder who could have done this and how did this go unnoticed for so long,” VanGuilder wrote in an email to the Oracle.

Klas 208 is a room that other classes and teams also use as space, making it difficult to determine and investigate who is responsible or who has information about the incident.

VanGuilder, a member of Hamline Football, says his team meets in class every Tuesday and Thursday.

“I remember precisely on [Nov. 3] no one sat there,” he said. “So he could have been there on Wednesday or even Tuesday night.”

The class has 23 students spread across majors and areas of interest. Cam Fotsch is a second-year transfer student in the class.

“As bad as it sounds, as a trans/queer person, I’m not new to LGBTQ+ hateful rhetoric, but it’s still alarming to see something like this in a class that I love and love. I feel totally comfortable,” Fotsch told the Oracle. in an email.

Dougherty also pointed to the frustration and pain felt by the students.

“It’s the end of the semester…everyone is tired, everyone has homework they’re behind on, and as they go through their days on a gray, overcast day, the last thing they need more is for their humanity to be attacked and threatened,” she said. said.

Dougherty pledged to continue the discussion. The following week, t. Aaron Hans, director of Hamline’s Sexualities and Gender Diversity program, spoke to the class. Dougherty has also taken steps to communicate with a wider Hamline audience.

“I called a meeting with the Vice President of Inclusive Excellence [David Everett]my dean [Marcela Kostihova]athletics manager [Jason Verdugo] … and said what if the answer comes from us? said Dougherty. “At least the community [will] know that there are names, faces and people who say, we all take responsibility for this space.

On November 15, the Office of the Dean of Students notified the undergraduate student body of the incident in an email.

The email condemned the message as a “widespread homophobic threat”, expressed support for Hamline’s LGBTQIA+ community, included resources and highlighted a commitment to inclusivity. An administrative investigation did not identify a perpetrator.

“Language has weight, language is action, language has meaning. This threatening act has no place in Hamline and is not a reflection of the community we choose or want to be,” the email read.

It was signed by the HUSC Executive Committee, Dougherty, Everett, Hans, Verdugo and Dean of Students Patti Kersten.

“If we make enough noise…people who mean these things and feel these things won’t feel at home here,” Dougherty said. “If you’re spitting hate and threatening other people’s lives…even if it’s one person among us, it represents all of us, and we need to let people know that’s not who we are. are.”

Fotsch appreciates how the incident was handled, especially in the harsh reality of a world where queerphobia still exists.

“It’s hard to deal with queerphobia in a school that prides itself on being accepted (or anywhere for that matter), but I’m glad to know that this incident was not ignored but listened to by the faculty. Overall, I’m confident the staff here are supportive and welcoming — I just think some students didn’t quite get the memo,” Fotsch said.

Additional resources both on and off campus are:

Sexuality and gender diversity programs in Hamline – call or email t. aaron hans at 651-523-2380, tahans@hamline.edu

Hamline Health and Counseling Services – 651-523-2204, counselinghealth@hamline.edu

Outfront MN – www.outfront.org

Project Trevor- www.trevor.org

Trans lifeline – translifeline.org(877) 565-8860

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Democrats have another chance to expand Medicare https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/democrats-have-another-chance-to-expand-medicare/ Mon, 14 Nov 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/democrats-have-another-chance-to-expand-medicare/ With Ben Leonard and Megan R. Wilson A majority victory in the Senate could breathe new life into the Democrats’ health policy agenda. | Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images WHAT DEMS SECURING THE SENATE MEANS FOR HEALTH IN AMERICA — Over the weekend, Democrats cemented their control of the Senatetell us POLITICO’s Natalie Allison, Marianne Levine and […]]]>

With Ben Leonard and Megan R. Wilson

WHAT DEMS SECURING THE SENATE MEANS FOR HEALTH IN AMERICAOver the weekend, Democrats cemented their control of the Senatetell us POLITICO’s Natalie Allison, Marianne Levine and Jessica Piper.

Incumbent Democratic Senator Catherine Cortez Masto (D-Nev.) narrowly won over her Republican opponent. Georgian Senate seats will be determined in a runoff next month, but Cortez Masto’s victory on Saturday means the upper house will have at least 50 votes – with a potential tiebreaker from Vice President Kamala Harris – for the next two years.

Democratic leaders have expressed interest in crafting another major spending bill, which could be another chance for lawmakers to tackle expanding Medicare and improving health care measures. childcare removed from previous legislation.

The House, meanwhile, remains undecided., although he leans Republican. This result, combined with the strong presence of the GOP in the Senate, would mean that we can expect to see investigations into the federal response to the pandemic and the origins of the virus.

And the fact that the Senate remains under Democratic control gives the Biden administration a key advantage: a clear path for new agency appointments. Currently, the Biden administration has 79 named positions open without appointments — including the role of director of the National Institutes of Health and associate administrator for relief, response and resilience at the U.S. Agency for International Development — and he will be responsible for filling any new vacancies. Now that Democratic control of the Senate is secure until at least 2025, the administration can comfortably make appointments to those positions without fear of GOP stalling tactics.

Additionally, if the Democrats hold their 51st seat in Georgia’s runoff election, the path to nominating any appointee won’t require the approval of all Democratic senators — especially those like Joe Manchin (DW.Va .) and Kyrsten Sinema (D-Arizona) whose influence has already sunk Biden administration nominations.

WELCOME TO MONDAY PULSE – I’m Katherine Ellen Foley, I replace Daniel and Krista today. New data from the Harvard Business Review suggests that rudeness towards frontline workers, including those in the health sector, is on the rise — and it has tangible consequences for the mental health of employees. Send advice, constructive criticism and compliments to [email protected], [email protected]and [email protected].

TODAY ON OUR PULSE CHECK PODCAST: A pair of little-discussed Republican victories on Tuesday threatens to undermine abortion access in two states. Megan Messerly shares with me why this highlights a bright spot for the GOP amid an otherwise tough election night for anti-abortion groups.

GOP HOUSE E&C LEADERS REMAIN FRUSTRATED WITH PHEThe public health emergency will remain intact until mid-January, due to the lack of notice from the Department of Health and Human Services alerting states to the end of the declaration on Friday, adding to the frustration of some GOP lawmakers.

“Earlier this fall, President Biden made it clear that the pandemic was over, but he continues to exploit power reserved only for times of emergency to circumvent Congress and send mixed signals to the American people at a time when many have lost faith in our public health. agencies,” Republican Energy and Commerce Leader Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-Wash) and Health Subcommittee Leader Brett Guthrie (R-Ky.) said in a statement to PULSE.

“Instead of constantly moving the goalposts, his administration must provide the public with the metrics it will use to assess the state of Covid-19 risk and what its plan is to resolve the public health emergency,” they said. they added.

EXCLUSIVE: HEALTH GROUPS URGE CONGRESS TO ACT ON INSULIN PRICESMore than 50 public health advocacy groups, including the American Academy of Family Physicians, Public Citizen and T1International, sent a letter to congressional leaders asking them to solve the problem of high insulin cost In Monday. The letter, sent on World Diabetes Day, specifically calls on lawmakers to stop insulin manufacturers from setting exorbitant prices and to find a way to ensure that those who are uninsured and have insurance private can access affordable insulin.

TOBACCO INDUSTRY SEEKS TO DELAY CALIFORNIA FLAVORED TOBACCO BANRJ Reynolds, the maker of menthol cigarettes Newport, and several other tobacco companies filed suit and sought a preliminary injunction against the State of California in the District Court for the Southern District of California, arguing its ban approved by the voters of flavored tobacco products. is unconstitutional, I point out.

It’s not new to the industry: It has sued local courts in several states that have banned the sale of flavored tobacco, using a similar constitutional argument. In these cases, the lower courts ruled in favor of the localities, and the courts continued to rule against the industry after appealing those decisions. But in the case against California, the companies also argue that the ban would violate provisions of the Interstate Commerce Clause by prohibiting the sale of products made outside of California – something that has not previously been disputed.

“It’s not that Reynolds thinks they can win on the dormant commerce clause, but what they need to do is get a court to stay the law while the litigation happens” , did he declare. “It’s a delaying tactic if nothing else. They [tobacco companies] have nothing to lose,” says Desmond Jenson, an attorney at the Public Health Law Center at Mitchell Hamline School of Law.

IS IT EASY FOR AMERICANS TO FIND A TEST TO TREAT THE SITE? A new study published in Open JAMA Network found that many Americans do not live near a Covid-19 Test to Treat site, making it harder for them to access antiviral drugs.

Researchers from Harvard Medical School and other institutions report that about 15% of the US population lives more than a 60-minute drive from one of the country’s 2,227 Test to Treat sites. This number was much higher in rural areas, where about 60% of residents lived an hour or more from a site.

According to the results of the study, 17% of adults aged 65 or older lived more than 60 minutes from the nearest site, as well as 30% of American Indians or Alaskan Natives, 17% of whites , 8% of Hispanics and 8% of black individuals.

Maggie Hermann is now a health insurance specialist Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Office of Legislation. She was previously Senior Legislative Assistant for Representative Dan Kildee (D-Mich.).

Caitlin Carroll had her last day as Director of Communications for Senator Richard Burr (RN.C.) and the Senate HELP Committee on Friday. She says she plans to announce her next move soon.

Victoria Blatter, Amgen’s senior vice president of global government affairs and policy will retire at the end of this year, the company announced. Greg Porter, who has worked at Amgen for 17 years, will be promoted to this role.

Lead plaintiff in Supreme Court case that revolutionized disability rights, Lois Curtis, has died aged 55, Sam Roberts of The New York Times writes.

For the Washington Post, William Wan documents the pressure on suicidal Yale students to leave college and then be forced to reapply.

Children living with long Covid are struggling to find care at the limited number of pediatric facilities tackling the disease in the United States, Jonathan Lambert writes for Grid.

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IWLCA Names 2022 Kristina Quigley Fellowship Winner https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/iwlca-names-2022-kristina-quigley-fellowship-winner/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 19:00:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/iwlca-names-2022-kristina-quigley-fellowship-winner/ “I want to congratulate Karen Heggerness on receiving the 2022 Kristina Quigley Award,” said Mike Scerbo, former Duquesne University head coach, selection committee chair and mentor to Quigley in his first college coaching job. . “Our committee was unanimous that Karen embodies all of the wonderful qualities that have guided Kristie through her life; dedication […]]]>

“I want to congratulate Karen Heggerness on receiving the 2022 Kristina Quigley Award,” said Mike Scerbo, former Duquesne University head coach, selection committee chair and mentor to Quigley in his first college coaching job. . “Our committee was unanimous that Karen embodies all of the wonderful qualities that have guided Kristie through her life; dedication to family, love of coaching and the harmonious blend of the two.

In her scholarship application, Heggerness wrote, “This job is hard on the family. Long weekends away. Nights and mornings away. My wife has been by my side all this time. My passion for coaching can only come true if I keep my family and my team connected. I learned raising a toddler and coaching a team that it’s more similar than different. Both require patience, consistent training, and a lot of relationship building.

Heggerness went on to describe how his wife, Briana Brady, stepped into the position of caretaker and parent in the blink of an eye as Heggerness faced a medical emergency that would sideline her for six months while struggling. to get full custody of their nephew. “As well as doing all the parenting and foster care duties like visits and social work calls, my wife has also become my home nurse. When I felt like I would never recover, she supported me and listened carefully. Every day I see the scar that reminds me of how much she cared for me and Layne during such a difficult time.

The description of the Kristina Quigley Scholarship reads, in part:

To honor the passion, commitment and values ​​of Kristina Quigley, the IWLCA has created a scholarship in her name. The purpose of this scholarship will be to subsidize a trip to the venue of the IWLCA Annual Meeting for the recipient’s family. The time-consuming nature of the coaching profession is important and family time is often sacrificed. The opportunity for a family to join a coach on this journey represents the very essence of Kristina Quigley.

Heggerness was selected by the Kristina Quigley Scholarship Committee based on her response to the essay detailing her ‘passion for training and family’ and describing ‘what it would be like to have your family with you to the IWLCA Convention”. After being informed of her selection, Heggerness said: My family and I are honored to receive the Kristina Quigley IWLCA Scholarship for sponsored travel to the IWLCA convention. Kristina’s passion for merging her coaching life and family life is something I strive to achieve in my own life. Now that my wife and I will soon be adopting our biological nephew through foster care, we are thrilled to have the chance to make some amazing memories on our trip to Dallas.

The 2022 IWLCA Convention, presented by StringKing, will be held at the Hilton Anatole in Dallas, TX, November 16-18. Heggerness will be present with his wife Briana and their two-year-old adopted son, Layne.

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A LITTLE SAFER FOR EVERYONE https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/a-little-safer-for-everyone/ Wed, 09 Nov 2022 17:07:19 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/a-little-safer-for-everyone/ By TESHA M. CHRISTENSEN For decades neighbors have been asking for something to be done to make it safer to cross the street in Snelling and Englewood.In October 2022, the city finally installed a traffic light.“I had heard about it for so long and had no idea something was going to happen this year,” said […]]]>

By TESHA M. CHRISTENSEN

For decades neighbors have been asking for something to be done to make it safer to cross the street in Snelling and Englewood.
In October 2022, the city finally installed a traffic light.
“I had heard about it for so long and had no idea something was going to happen this year,” said Mike Reynolds, a member of the Hamline Midway Coalition (HMC) transportation committee and Hamline professor. “I had just heard rumors that this would ‘happen’. Then suddenly, one day this summer, public works was around the corner doing stuff. I texted [HMC Executive Director] Sarah O’Brien and [HMC board member] John Levin and said: This is it?
It was.
“I was very excited when this was put together,” Mike Reynolds said. “I spoke with a group of new students at Hamline University about the long problems and how difficult but rewarding it can be to try to solve what seems like a small problem – but putting the focus on ways in which the community can be empowered to find solutions. I have also been involved with Hamline Elementary in my role at HU, as we develop and continue to refine the partnership between schools. This summer, as Galtier was closing and as these families sought to learn more about Hamline Elementary, there was a lot of anxiety walking through Snelling…and seeing the lights come on was a huge relief for a lot of people.

A COMMUNITY PROBLEM
With a primary school on one side of Snelling and a university on the other, the intersection is very busy with students. The dual carriageway makes the crossing perilous, as one side of the traffic may stop but not the other. “This is compounded by very high speeds heading south over the bridge to Midway, but also when people are speeding from the Snelling/Minnehaha intersection. Various interventions (the flashing speed sign; planted medians; crosswalks; public art projects including murals at SuperAmerica, Mirror of Korea and Hamline Elementary, as well as a wire project the along the fence at elementary school) never really reduced speeds or concerns,” Reynolds said.
“Without the red light, adults have to stand in the middle of the road, facing traffic, to make sure everyone stops so kids can cross safely,” Jessica Kopp remarked, who sits on the St. Paul School Board.
Conversations about safety in Snelling and Englewood date back at least to the 1990s, when a former Hamline sculptor, Mike Price, made a rough design for a pedestrian bridge. Around 2004, HMC and Hamline University staff connected with MnDOT and the City of St. Paul to explore options, but nothing was implemented. The MnDOT did a major study on Snelling Avenue sometime between 2008 and 2011, but again there was a lot of talk about improving footpaths around schools and libraries, but nothing came of it. been done at Snelling and Englewood.
Kopp became involved around 2017 when her daughter was attending Hamline Elementary School. One year there was a safety walk when a designated person walked with a group of families and then neighbor and school board member Mary Vanderwert to both be visible to the community and show how much he was difficult to cross Snelling Avenue safely. Kopp investigated a planning grant application through the Safe Routes to Schools program in 2018. She was part of a Stop For Me program in 2019.
Kopp reignited the questions and conversations. Working with Ward 4 and the Ward’s District Council, Kopp and other community members reaffirmed the paramount need to improve pedestrian safety at this intersection. What street level changes might be possible at the intersection? Those questions were posed to the City of St. Paul’s traffic engineer, St. Paul’s Department of Public Works — and they got some traction, according to Reynolds and current HMC chief executive Sarah O. ‘Brian. The city has offered some options to the Minnesota Department of Transportation (MnDOT). Then, once again, neighborhood activists waited, thanks to a thorough investigation and technical study.
The city’s traffic engineer attended several meetings of the Hamline Midway Coalition’s transportation committee over a two-year period to discuss the intersection, the alternatives being considered, and the rationale for choosing a traffic light. circulation as the preferred treatment.
HMC worked with Ward 4 and local businesses on a North Snelling revitalization project in 2019. “I know pedestrian safety and difficult traffic conditions have been set as key criteria for the challenges of increased development of properties along North Snelling,” Reynolds said. “I think the last conversation may have been the straw on the camel’s back, and caused various parties to go back to previous proposals and get them out of the ‘parking lot’ and into budget/planning.”
The process of getting that new red light was “at times a bit mysterious and a bit slow, but overall I think it’s pretty amazing how many people put their time, energy and expertise into it. to get things done,” Kopp said. “Every time I felt like it was fading, someone else would pick the ball up and run with it. As a neighbor, I felt incredibly supported by then council member Samantha Henningson, and current board member Mitra Jalali and HMC for taking the perspective of Hamline Elementary families seriously and gathering information from various neighbors and then bringing the right people together to find solutions. hoped that there was, however long, a path for neighbors to play an important role in creating the community they want.

MULTI-HANDED
“It’s such a great story and so many people have made it possible – many people in the Hamline Elementary community, including parents Karen McCauley and Jen Power, the Ward 4 office, Hamline University, the city of St. Paul and of course HMC – current and former executive directors, boards and members of the transportation committee have all been part of this story,” Kopp said. “I’m probably forgetting someone because this project was carried by many hands.”
Kopp is now employed at Hamline University and has watched the light progress on her daily walk to work.
She said: “Seeing the red lights was quite surreal – I never thought a bit of infrastructure could make me so happy.”

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Leadership style may be a deciding factor in Brooklyn Center’s mayoral race https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/leadership-style-may-be-a-deciding-factor-in-brooklyn-centers-mayoral-race/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 17:51:36 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/leadership-style-may-be-a-deciding-factor-in-brooklyn-centers-mayoral-race/ Police reform, housing and economic vitality may be the burning issues in the Brooklyn Center mayoral race, but it’s the two candidates’ leadership styles that could ultimately determine who wins on Nov. 8. The city’s charismatic and sometimes controversial mayor, Mike Elliott, is locked in a tight competition with city council member April Graves as […]]]>

Police reform, housing and economic vitality may be the burning issues in the Brooklyn Center mayoral race, but it’s the two candidates’ leadership styles that could ultimately determine who wins on Nov. 8.

The city’s charismatic and sometimes controversial mayor, Mike Elliott, is locked in a tight competition with city council member April Graves as the city decides how best to provide public safety services in the wake of the murder by the police of two black men in Brooklyn Center since 2019.

Elliott’s approach focused on community engagement and involving more voices to help shape decisions. But opponents say he has often allowed outsiders to run the show, creating a divide at City Hall.

Graves is committed to being a healer and “bridge builder” for the northern suburb of Metro, one of the most diverse cities in the state. That message apparently resonated with voters in the August primary, when Graves garnered 39% of the vote and beat Elliott, who is seeking a second term, by 5 percentage points.

In the months following the death of the police Daunte Wright during a traffic stop in April 2021, Elliott, the city’s first black mayor, convened the Community Safety and Violence Prevention Implementation Committee. The committee proposed using social workers and other trained professionals to respond to calls for medical and social needs that do not require police, and recommended the city use unarmed civilians to handle minor infractions. to the highway code.

Last fall, the city adopted a new citation policy allowing officers to ticket offenders for misdemeanors and felonies and let them go rather than arrest them.

Following Wright’s shooting, the city council — which includes Elliott — fired city manager Curt Boganey and gave the mayor authority over the police department. Elliott named Reggie Edwardswho is black, to replace Boganey.

Former police chief Tim Gannon has resigned, although he now claims in a lawsuit against the city that he was kicked out for refusing to immediately fire Officer Kimberly Potter after she shot and killed Wright. City leaders this year hired Kellace McDaniel as police chief, the second black chief in the city’s history.

“We responded quickly and with clarity, and we did so in a way that many are proud of,” Elliott said in an interview. “People are hurting from the status quo and want change to happen. I present clear, intentional, and inclusive leadership to move Brooklyn Center forward.”

“He engages citizens and that’s important,” said Steve Cooper, an Elliott supporter. “He’s been slow to build coalitions. He stays in touch with the different communities.”

However, board member Dan Ryan questioned Elliott’s professional commitment. Ryan and former mayoral candidate Laurie Ann Moore obtained a city document last month showing the mayor missed 43 votes and abstained eight times between June 2019 and August 2022.

Elliott “either didn’t want to take a tough and controversial vote or he just couldn’t decide which way to vote,” Ryan said.

Elliott said he disputes those findings and said he never missed a meeting. The Star Tribune has not received a response to a request for data targeting the attendance records of other board members.

Resident Kevin Scherber said Graves is collaborative rather than divisive. “She doesn’t push her thoughts on people,” he said. “She has thoughtful and inclusive responses. She will bring grace and dignity to this office, which is sorely lacking.”

Graves, 42, moved from St. Paul to Brooklyn Center in 2011 and four years later became the first woman of color elected to the council. A public health specialist with the Minneapolis Health Department’s Office of Violence Prevention, she supported some of the proposed changes to policing, but feared going too far.

Graves said in an interview that police reform can include a combination of police, social worker and violence prevention initiatives. “It doesn’t have to be one or the other. We need both,” she said.

Elliott, 38, emigrated from Liberia to Brooklyn Center with his family when he was 11 years old. He served as class president in his sophomore, middle school, and high school years at Brooklyn Center High School and earned a bachelor’s degree from Hamline University in St. Paul. He created and managed several small businesses.

Elliott said he’s proud the city under his leadership has enacted rent protection, lowered property taxes and added new multi-family housing.

Both candidates agree that investing in youth programs and improving housing options should be top priorities. They also agree that it’s important to boost the health of businesses in the city, given the loss of retailers such as Best Buy and Target.

One in four Brooklyn Center residents was born outside the United States. The city, which has a population of 32,000, is one of the poorest suburbs in Hennepin County, with 15% of its residents living below the federal poverty level, according to U.S. Census data.

Elliott said Brooklyn Center is moving in the right direction, pointing to developments in the works that include an international market center, more housing, a movie theater and a daycare center. There are also plans to revamp the town’s community center, he said.

“We are ready for economic growth,” Elliott said. “We are on this path and there is no turning back. Our best days are ahead of us.”

Says Graves, “We have to build trust. People want to feel heard and disagree with respect. When you lead that way, the climate can start to change.”

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Pipers win the polls – The Oracle https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/pipers-win-the-polls-the-oracle/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/pipers-win-the-polls-the-oracle/ Important Information, Resources, and Voting Guide for Hamline Students About Elections In 2018, many Hamline students went to the polls for the midterm elections, winning the ALL IN Challenge “Best in Class National Award”. It is an honor that reflects the value and goal of the Hamline Voting Committee to continue to get all students […]]]>

Important Information, Resources, and Voting Guide for Hamline Students About Elections

In 2018, many Hamline students went to the polls for the midterm elections, winning the ALL IN Challenge “Best in Class National Award”.

It is an honor that reflects the value and goal of the Hamline Voting Committee to continue to get all students to vote.

“Hamline University had the highest overall vote rate and the highest undergraduate vote rate at a 4-year private higher education institution,” Hamline’s Voting Committee said in a statement to the Oracle.

Hoping for a turnout like this, or better yet: hoping to top it, this election season, the Hamline Voting Committee is running the #MidtermsMatter campaign that encourages Hamline students to get out and vote this election day, November 8.

The Hamline Voting Committee is arranging to provide transportation (Hamline Vans) to the polling place as well as walking with students to polling places from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m.,” Nur Mood of the Wesley Center told the ‘Oracle in an email. “The pickup location is Public Safety and the polling place is the Hamline Hi-Rise; 777 Hamline Ave N St. Paul, MN 55104.”

Students with questions should visit the Hamline Votes table at Anderson Center on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays between 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. Hamline Votes staff will be available to answer questions and help students register to vote. The online registration deadline is October 18, however, voters will be able to register at their local polling station on November 8.

Jane Krentz, a former Minnesota senator and director of the McVay Youth Partnership in Hamline, detailed the importance of the vote in a letter to the editor published in the Oracle on October 4.

Elected officials at all levels make decisions that impact your day-to-day life and will certainly impact your future,” Krentz said. “People have fought and died for your right to vote. Please don’t waste it. It’s the first step towards creating a future you believe in… Despite being a cliché, it’s also true — Every vote counts!

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Feeding Our Future, Taiwan, Nuclear Bombs, Saudi Arabia, Affections, World Expo https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/feeding-our-future-taiwan-nuclear-bombs-saudi-arabia-affections-world-expo/ Sun, 16 Oct 2022 23:03:35 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/feeding-our-future-taiwan-nuclear-bombs-saudi-arabia-affections-world-expo/ Review Editor’s Note: Star Tribune Opinion publishes letters readers online and in print every day. To contribute, click here. ••• The sheer madness of Minnesota’s current food fraud snafu: While rules have been relaxed to limit on-site visits, a simple drive-by of the first slip showing that 2,000 meals were being served a day would […]]]>

Review Editor’s Note: Star Tribune Opinion publishes letters readers online and in print every day. To contribute, click here.

•••

The sheer madness of Minnesota’s current food fraud snafu: While rules have been relaxed to limit on-site visits, a simple drive-by of the first slip showing that 2,000 meals were being served a day would have clearly shown that something was wrong (“Three plead guilty to federal food fraud,” October 14). Based on the volume of food being prepared, there would have been a very busy loading dock with bread orders, milk trucks, produce orders and semi-finished products from major food suppliers. There would have been overflowing dumpsters and a very good chance of seeing cooks outside on their breaks looking at their phones.

Surely at least one of the watchdogs worked in the company and hammered 600 orders (“covers” in restaurant terms) at a Mother’s Day brunch, for example. Any restaurateur would say 2,000 meals a day? Certainly not!

Doug Pittman, Minneapolis

The writer is a cook.

TAIWAN

The op-ed “Biden’s faux pas on strategic ambiguity” is dead wrong (October 11). President Joe Biden is not fooled. He declares that we will put troops in the field to defend Taiwan, then comes back, rinses and repeats. I don’t see how it can be more ambiguous than that. China no longer knows what to think!

Jim Weidner, Minneapolis

NUCLEAR BOMBS

John Rash is right when he writes, “The horrors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki should have convinced the world that nuclear weapons must never be deployed again” (“Nuclear Threats Prove Former the peace “). The Doomsday Clock by the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists is 100 seconds to midnight, and that does not take into account the current world situation. President Joe Biden is right to warn us of armageddon.

In a special way, the citizens of St. Paul are tied to Nagasaki. The two cities are the oldest Japanese-American sister cities. The Japanese garden, the tea house and the cherry trees in Como Park are reminders of our friendship. Paul Granlund’s “Constellation Earth” sculpture sits very close to the Peace Statue in the Peace Park in Nagasaki. It was a gift to the city of Nagasaki from the people of St. Paul.

In 2018, students from Hamline University visiting Nagasaki joined Nagasaki University students at the Atomic Bomb Museum and proclaimed that everyone should be educated about nuclear weapons. Hearing from Beatrice Fihn of the International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons, they endorsed the Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons and asked for support for the agreement on campus.

On January 22, 2021, an overwhelming majority of the nations of the world adopted the historic agreement to ban nuclear weapons. The United States has yet to join this effort. Our country has 5,428 nuclear weapons. Now is the time to call on the United States to sign the treaty. It’s time for us to once again join the “hibakushas” (survivors) and proclaim “Never again”.

Jim Scheibel, St. Paul

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While threatening to use nuclear weapons against Ukraine, Russian President Vladimir Putin mocks the fact that the United States has set a precedent by dropping nuclear bombs on Japan. He forgets to mention that the Soviet Union and the United States were allies at the time and that the attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki saved the lives of countless Russian soldiers by shortening the war.

Richard Virden, Plymouth

The author is a retired senior foreign service officer.

SAUDI ARABIA

US senators and president now say Saudi Arabia may not be a reliable partner as OPEC+ will cut oil production (“Saudis push back on US, defend oil cuts “, October 14). Where have these leaders gone? In June, the Washington Post reported that “the Saudi-led coalition carried out more than 150 airstrikes on civilian targets in Yemen, including homes, hospitals and communications towers…”. Analysis of government contract reports showed that the United States provided weapons, training, or maintenance support to the majority of fighter squadrons during these bombings. Proponents of “America first” seem to care, as long as American arms manufacturers can cash in. Congressional war powers resolutions aimed at curbing this support for Saudi aircraft have been in committee for months. All Minnesota House Democrats co-sponsored them. It’s time to push the resolutions forward.

James Haefemeyer, Minneapolis

SENIOR LIFE

Thanks to Karen Schott for her comment, “Don’t call me ‘honey.’ Or ‘darling’. Or ‘dear’. Or ‘cute'” (Opinion Exchange, October 14).

I have taught courses at four colleges and universities on gerontology and aging. I have worked in the field of aging since my early 20s. I wrote a novel. I am now semi-retired. So when I met my future knee surgeon and she called me “young lady” three times, and when she told me she had fallen down and how two “little old ladies” l helped them up, I was appalled. But hey, she was going to cut me off, so I didn’t say anything. Karen, you would have spoken! I will do that next time. Go ahead, elder to be admired!

Lois Rafferty, Minneapolis

•••

I read the opinion pieces and letters published on the Star Tribune opinion pages every day. Many of these pieces I find are thought-provoking; some of them leave me with a smile, some force me to re-examine my thinking; while other pieces leave me shaking my head. Karen Schott’s opinion piece published on Friday is an example of a head-shaker for me. Schott apparently gleefully relishes her name in the derogatory way “Karen” has become known: you know that person, the one who typically asks to “talk to the manager” in order to put others down, calling out behaviors and/or actions. that they consider unacceptable, based on their own unique set of values ​​(which are, unfortunately, usually closed).

Schott’s opinion piece is an example of this and what is wrong with our society today; that is, people who walk around with their heads full of conspiratorial thoughts and perceived ulterior motives that they attribute to others. The examples that Schott cites in her article strike me as examples of others trying to put her at ease and demonstrate that they have her full attention in times like these. Schott finds that this attention is diminishing. In both instances, these employees could have simply ignored Schott, said nothing to her at all, or treated her very impersonally. In that case, given the tone of Schott’s article, I think she would complain.

I think we should be grateful every day for the gifts we have. I also think that we, and our entire society, need to do better to give others slack, give them the benefit of the doubt, and always be aware that there might be bigger fish to fry.

Bob Doyle, savage

WORLD EXHIBITION

Don’t even think about it (“Twin Cities make World’s Fair bid”, October 13).

There were reasons why the 1984 New Orleans World’s Fair was the last World’s Fair in the United States. He ended $140 million in debt. Bankruptcy has been declared. Investigations launched. Paychecks bounced. Indictments have been issued. The marketing director was sent to prison for fraud and bribes. Attendance, projected at 12-15 million, was only 7 million.

One of the goals of these shows is to showcase the latest and greatest ideas, technologies and “tricks”. We receive this daily from the Internet, television and other sources. Carnival rides were available, but our country is full of theme parks. The Twin Cities are not in the same league as New York and London in terms of culture, entertainment, restaurants or other parameters.

If the planners think it will be a success, they ignore the facts, are overly optimistic, or are just plain arrogant.

Don’t.

James Eelkema, Burnsville

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Johnnie Swim & Dive opens 2022-23 season Saturday at St. Kate’s https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/johnnie-swim-dive-opens-2022-23-season-saturday-at-st-kates/ Fri, 14 Oct 2022 18:33:50 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/johnnie-swim-dive-opens-2022-23-season-saturday-at-st-kates/ History links Saint John Swimming and Diving opens its 2022-23 season with the St. Catherine Pentathlon at 11 a.m. on Saturday, October 15 in St. Paul. – Live video THE ENCOUNTER: Each swimmer will compete in a 100-yard version of each of five strokes: backstroke, breaststroke, butterfly, freestyle and individual medley. A […]]]>

Saint John Swimming and Diving opens its 2022-23 season with the St. Catherine Pentathlon at 11 a.m. on Saturday, October 15 in St. Paul. – Live video

THE ENCOUNTER: Each swimmer will compete in a 100-yard version of each of five strokes: backstroke, breaststroke, butterfly, freestyle and individual medley.

A LOOK AT THE JOHNNIES: The Saint John Swim and Dive Team and Fourth Year Head Coach Ben Gill are optimistic for the 2022-23 season. And for good reason. SJU set a program record with 731 points at the 2022 MIAC Championships, finishing second out of six teams, and the majority of those student-athletes are returning this season.

The Johnnies return 81% (455 of 561) of individual points earned at the 2022 MIAC Championships, where SJU finished second out of six teams, as well as three MIAC Individual Champions in 2022-23. The relays are also preparing well for SJU, as the Johnnies fire all four members of the three freestyle relays and must replace one from each of the four strokes. All five relays finished second in the conference meet last February.

Diving force
SJU scored 50 points in each of two diving events last season and all three Johnnies are back. MIAC Diver of the Year 2022, second year Eli Grabinski (Sauk Rapids, Minn./Sauk Rapids-Rice) won both conference titles in convincing fashion last year after joining SJU for the spring and senior semester Connor Roseau (Elk River, Minn./Spectrum) finished second in both dives. Senior Christian Pfau (Williston, ND) totaled 26 points with two sixth-place finishes from the diving board.

Grabinski and Reed qualified for the NCAA Regional in Calvin, Mich., where Grabinski finished 10th out of 27 divers with a score of 433.60 in the 3-meter dive and 18th in the 1-meter dive. Reed made his second NCAA Regional appearance (2020) and finished 19th in the 3-meter dive (396.05) and 22nd in the 1-meter dive (355.20).

Two Grabinskis in the same pool
SJU also returns 2020 MIAC Co-Diver of the Year, Senior Jack Grabinsky (Sauk Rapids, Minn./Sauk Rapids-Rice), who is a two-time CSCAA All-American and Scholar All-American, and the 2020 conference champion in the 3-meter dive. He studied abroad last spring in Chile and missed the 2022 MIAC Championships, but would have had two NCAA Division III Championship appearances under his belt had that meet not been canceled in 2020 and 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The back champion is back
In the pool, SJU returns eight swimmers who have combined for a total of 25 All-MIAC honors (the top three at MIAC Championships). MIAC’s top student-athlete on backstroke last season, senior Joe Koller (Savage, Minn./Shakopee) returns after winning the 100- (50.88) and 200-yard (1:51.44) backstroke with SJU records at the 2022 MIAC Championships. It also served as the first leg in the Johnnies medley relay teams. He hit the wall fourth in the 200-yard individual medley.

Upper class leadership
A pair of elders, Handsome Brinkman (three; Wayzata, Minn.) and Ethan Huber (four; Mitchell, SD), have combined for seven All-MIAC honors through performances on SJU relays in the last two conference meetings. Individually, Brinkman ranked sixth in the 50-yard freestyle, seventh in the 100-yard backstroke and 11th in the 200-yard backstroke last year. The 2022-23 SJU Student-Athlete Advisory Committee (SAAC) chairman, Huber finished fifth in the 400-yard individual medley, sixth in the 200-yard individual medley and seventh in the 200-yard breaststroke.

Another upper class student, junior Alex Heer (St. Paul, Minn./Cretin-Derham Hall) finished seventh in the 100 and 200 yard butterfly and 11th in the 100 yard backstroke. Senior Tim Belov (Medina, Minn./Wayzata) collected two 14th-place finishes in both breaststroke events.

Freshmen in the SJU Book of Records
Second year Carter Larson (Sartell, Minn./Sartell-St. Stephen) recorded three top-eight finishes at last year’s MIAC Championships – sixth in the 500-yard freestyle, seventh in the 1,650-yard freestyle and eighth in the 200-yard freestyle. He set four SJU records for a freshman. His times in the 1000- (10:01.46) and 1650 yards (16:35.69) are currently the third fastest in program history, while his times in the 200- (1:42.90) and 500 yards (4 :43.26 ) freestyles are fourth.

Second year Liam Noble (Plymouth, Minn./Benilde-St. Margaret’s) led SJU with a total of five All-MIAC honors last year in its first conference meeting. He joined Koller as an All-MIAC individual swimmer with a third-place finish in the 50-yard freestyle and competed in four of five relays. He just missed out on All-MIAC distinction with a fourth-place finish in the 100-yard backstroke and 100-yard freestyle. Noble’s times in the 50 (20.99) and 100 yard (46.40) freestyles are good for fifth all-time among SJU freshmen.

Second year Andre East (Minneapolis, Minn./South) placed fifth in the 100-yard butterfly in the conference meet, thanks to the third-fastest time by an SJU freshman (52.31), as well as 10th in the 200 yard butterfly and 11th in the 100 meter breaststroke.

Second year Connor Thayer (Prior Lake, Minn.) touched the wall ninth in the 500 and 1,650 yard freestyle, and 11th in the 200 yard freestyle at the 2022 MIAC Championships. His time of 4:47.85 in the 500 yard freestyle was fourth fastest of a first-year SJU student.

More freshman points
Three more 2022-23 sophomores provided points for SJU as a rookie at the 2022 MIAC Championships. Colby Kern (Delano, Minn.) narrowly missed All-MIAC recognition with a fourth-place finish in the 50-yard freestyle and finished seventh in the 100-yard butterfly and 100-yard freestyle. Zach Ruoff (Melrose, Minn./Melrose Area) finished ninth in the 50-yard freestyle, 10th in the 100-yard freestyle and 12th in the 200-yard freestyle, while Langston Philion (Maple Grove, Minn.) finished 11th in the 200-yard butterfly.

The 2022-23 calendar
After Saturday’s season opener, the Johnnies return to St. Paul at the end of the month (October 29) for a game in Macalester. SJU hosts St. Olaf (November 4) and Hamline (November 11), as well as its invite when the competition returns on January 14. The home program ends on January 28 with a double encounter against Gustavus Adolphus. The 2023 MIAC Championships are scheduled for February 15-18 at the Jean Freeman Aquatic Center at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. The 2023 NCAA Division III Championships will be held March 15-18 in Greensboro, North Carolina

LAST YEAR’S PENTATHLON: SJU began its 2021-22 season with a head-to-head win over Hamline in last year’s St. Catherine’s Pentathlon held October 16, 2021 in the Butler Center Pool.

Kern edged Huber, 135-134, to lead the team in points. Junior Alex Heer (St. Paul, Minn./Cretin-Derham Hall) was just behind in a tie for fourth place (132).

Koller won the backstroke (55.58) and Larson hit the wall first in the freestyle (48.89).

Kern led SJU with a second-place butterfly (55.38), while Jack Mehus finished second in the breaststroke (1:04.43) and individual medley (56.95).

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The average housing tax increases by 14.8% https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/the-average-housing-tax-increases-by-14-8/ Wed, 12 Oct 2022 19:19:00 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/the-average-housing-tax-increases-by-14-8/ By JANE McCLURE Homeowners in the area may want to open their mailboxes carefully in November. Statements of truth about taxation will likely result in a sticker clash with rising home values ​​and property taxes.Public school officials in St. Paul, Ramsey County and St. Paul have released information on 2022 property values ​​and estimated 2023 […]]]>

By JANE McCLURE

Homeowners in the area may want to open their mailboxes carefully in November. Statements of truth about taxation will likely result in a sticker clash with rising home values ​​and property taxes.
Public school officials in St. Paul, Ramsey County and St. Paul have released information on 2022 property values ​​and estimated 2023 taxes for median market value homes in the 17 planning districts and suburban communities of St. Paul, at a meeting of the Joint Property Tax Advisory Committee on Sept. 28.
A caveat is that taxes can vary widely from property to property and can be affected by comparable sales in an area and by physical improvements or property damage. But the look at a neighborhood’s median home value is an indicator of what may be to come.
County-wide, overall estimated market values ​​are at an all-time high, which has continued strong growth due to strong demand and low supply of homes. But it raises red flags about a growing accessibility gap.
The trends are worrying for elected officials. County Commissioner Victoria Reinhardt noted that the median cost of living in Ramsey County exceeds the median income. The county commissioners are calling for the joint committee to do more to examine how to reduce the costs of government, in particular the costs of maintaining debt.

TRANSFER OF THE TAX BURDEN ON HOUSES
Of all property types in St. Paul and Ramsey County, home values ​​have increased the most, said Corey Erickson, the county’s acting assistant assessor. But it means more of a shift in the property tax burden for landlords and apartment building owners, and less pain for commercial and industrial property owners. For example, the average building owner will see a 6.5% increase in property tax. Commercial property taxes would only increase by an average of 1.3%.
The median home market value in all of St. Paul is $266,300 for taxes owing in 2023. That’s up from last year’s value of $228,700. The increases due to tax transfers are $235, with further potential increases of up to $271 with the various maximum levies. This represents an increase of $506 or 14.8% from $3,418 to $3,924.
Local authorities are promoting property tax rebate and homestead credit programs in several neighborhoods, including homeowners in Frogtown and Hamline-Midway. St. Paul City Council members are already looking for ways to reduce the 15.34% tax increase proposed by Mayor Melvin Carter. (See related story.)
Of the neighborhoods in the area, Frogtown saw the largest increase in median market value in 2022 and property taxes payable in 2023. Median home value rose from $170,300 to $200,100, an increase of 17.5%. Property taxes would go from $2,412 this year to $2,821 next year, an increase of 17%.
The median value home in Hamline-Midway follows closely, with a 17% increase from $210,000 to $254,600. Property taxes on this median-value home would increase by 15.6%, from $3,097 to $3,579.
Como’s median home value rose from $258,200 to $294,700, an increase of 14.1%. Property taxes would increase from $3,927 to $4,397, an increase of 12%.
Median home values ​​in St. Anthony Park increased 12.7% from $328,500 to $370,200. Property taxes would increase by 10.1%, from $5,139 to $5,656.
The Union Park neighborhoods of Merriam Park, Lexington-Hamline and Snelling-Hamline are seeing a median value increase of 12%, from $342,300 to $383,500. Property taxes would increase from $5,377 to $5,878 or 9.3%.
The highest median market value increase for taxes payable in 2023 is Payne-Phalen at 20.8%, from $194,500 to $234,900. Property taxes would increase by 20.2%, from $2,859 to $3,104.
The only neighborhood with a decline in market value was Downtown, when median home values ​​fell 1.2% from $188,700 to $186,400.
A look at the value trends of 2018 and 2022 is striking. The area of ​​the city with the biggest change is Dayton’s Bluff, where the median value increased from $130,500 in 2018 to $214,700 in 2022, an increase of 64.5%.
Neighborhoods in the surveillance area experienced varying impacts over this period, with Frogtown recording the largest increase in median value at 57.1%. The median home value was $129,200 in 2018 and $203,000 in 2022.
Hamline-Midway median values ​​increased from $177,900 in 2018 to $242,100 in 2022, a 36.1% increase. Close behind are the median Como values, rising from $219,900 in 2018 to $296,850 in 2022, a 35% increase.
The median home value in St. Anthony Park has increased 30% over this period, from $348,800 in 2018 to $453,500. Merriam Park-Lexington-Hamline-Snelling-Hamline neighborhoods saw a median value increase of 26.8%, from $300,900 in 2018 to $381,400 in 2022.
Looking at the city as a whole, the smallest increase in median value was seen in Highland Park. From 2018 to 2022, the median home value increased by 21.6%, from $327,250 to $398,050. Values ​​in Highland and other neighborhoods held up during the recession more than a decade ago, and this is reflected in recent trends.

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NASCAR teams call revenue model ‘broken’, warn of layoffs https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/nascar-teams-call-revenue-model-broken-warn-of-layoffs/ Fri, 07 Oct 2022 19:07:01 +0000 https://hamlinemidwayhistory.org/nascar-teams-call-revenue-model-broken-warn-of-layoffs/ NASCAR’s most powerful teams warned Friday that the venerable stock car racing series has a “broken” business model that is unfair and has little to no chance of long-term stability, a stunning announcement that adds to a growing list of woes. The Cup Series heads into the playoff race at Charlotte Motor Speedway on Sunday […]]]>

NASCAR’s most powerful teams warned Friday that the venerable stock car racing series has a “broken” business model that is unfair and has little to no chance of long-term stability, a stunning announcement that adds to a growing list of woes.

The Cup Series heads into the playoff race at Charlotte Motor Speedway on Sunday with three full-time drivers sidelined due to injuries sustained in NASCAR’s new car and no clear answer on how to fix security issues.

The situation escalated when the teams went public with their year-long fight with NASCAR for a fair revenue split.

“The business model is really broken for teams,” said Curtis Polk, who as longtime business manager for Michael Jordan now owns a stake in the Charlotte Hornets and two-car team 23XI Racing Jordan and Denny Hamlin in NASCAR.

“We’ve gotten to the point where the team realizes that sustainability in the sport isn’t very long term,” Polk said. “It’s not a fair system.”

The Race Team Alliance was formed in 2014 to give teams a unified voice in negotiations with the sanctioning body. A four-member subcommittee raised their concerns at a Charlotte hotel, with Polk joined by Jeff Gordon, four-time NASCAR champion and vice president of Hendrick Motorsports, RFK Racing president Steve Newmark, and Dave Alpern , the president of Joe Gibbs Racing.

Hendrick and Gibbs have won six of the last seven Cup Series championships since 2015, but Gordon said Hendrick’s four-car line, the strongest in the industry, hasn’t had a profitable season in years. He will lose money again this season despite NASCAR’s Next Gen car cost cut.

“I have a lot of fears that sustainability is going to be a real challenge,” Gordon said.

Led by Polk, whose role with the Hornets brings familiarity with the NBA’s franchise model, the RTA presented NASCAR in June with a seven-point plan on a new revenue-sharing model. The proposal “has been sitting there for months and we have told NASCAR that we would like a counter offer,” Polk said.

He did not divulge the seven points, except that the team’s durability and longevity were priorities. The committee said on Friday it was open to all ideas, including a Formula 1-like spending cap.

“We’re open to anything that takes us to a new conceptual structure,” Newmark said.

NASCAR responded to the RTA last week with a counteroffer “of minimal revenue increase and a focus on cost reduction,” Polk said.

The team alliance was unanimous in that the only place left to cut costs is layoffs.

“We have already suffered substantial reductions. We are doing more with less than ever in 30 years,” Alpern said.

NASCAR did not immediately respond to a request for comment from The Associated Press.

The cost battle has gone public with five races remaining to crown the 2022 NASCAR champion.

The issue has been simmering for years, and in 2016 NASCAR adopted a 36-car charter system that comes as close as possible to a franchise model in a sport independently founded and owned by the France family. Charters have at least given teams something of value to own — or sell — and protect their investment in the sport.

The team’s business model is still heavily dependent on sponsorship, which teams must secure individually. Newmark said the sponsorship covers between 60% and 80% of the budgets of the 16 chartered organizations.

Because sponsorship is so vital, the teams are desperate for financial help elsewhere and have asked NASCAR for “a league distribution to cover our base costs,” Newmark said.

The current charter agreement expires at the end of the 2024 season, at the same time as NASCAR’s current television agreements expire.

Although television money is split between NASCAR, the teams and the tracks, Polk said that in terms of actual revenue generated by the sport, 93% goes to NASCAR and the teams only receive 7%. He noted that in Formula 1, all revenue is split 50-50 between teams and series ownership.

Mars Inc., which first entered NASCAR in 1990, decided late last year that this season would be its last and JGR has spent the past nine months trying to find a new sponsor to keep Kyle. Busch, the only winner of multiple championships at Cup level. Busch has since signed with Richard Childress Racing and will leave JGR after 15 seasons as Toyota’s winningest NASCAR driver.

“We became full-time fundraisers,” Alpern said. “Instead of working on our business, we raise money just to exist.”

Polk said teams will honor charter deals through 2024. But in negotiating a new charter deal, teams are demanding more.

“NASCAR is a money-printing machine,” Polk said. “But it’s the teams and the drivers who make the show.”

NASCAR is now under fire from almost every angle as drivers remain angry over some recent penalties and the rigidity of the new Next Gen car accused of having caused unprecedented injuries. What should have been routine crashes against the wall sidelined the two Alex Bowman and Kurt Busch suffered concussions, and Cody Shane Ware pulled out of Sunday’s race with a broken foot.

NASCAR has been testing potential tweaks for the car and will present the results to drivers Saturday morning before testing in Charlotte.

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